david johansson

How to make wings without a harness

Most of the time wings that are a bit heavy needs the support of straps that goes around the shoulders and under the chest to stay up against your back. 

Harnesses works very good but if the dress etc have bare shoulders however the straps are going to show. 

This is how I normally do wings in a way to avoid having a harness for those character designs.

First of all this method will not work if the top/dress is loose fitted. The wings will require some support to hold them in place on your back. I find that corsets are the best for this especially if the wings are a bit heavy but I have also used it in tops without boning.

Start of making your wings seperated on two bars. Make sure the bars are made out of a stiff material since they are going to support the weight of the wings. If they end up being too weak and bend the wings will slope and gap away from your back. 

For my angel wings in felt I used 3 mm thick aluminum bars to hold up my, a bit more heavy, wings. I then covered them in worbla and connecting them using some more worbla, This creates a good wing base and makes them stay with a good distance from each other. 

In a similar way I attached an other pair of wings made out of worbla to a base, but since these wings are quite light a few layers of worbla was enough to keep them stiff and not bend.

Make sure not to make the base too short since you will stick it into your back lining and don’t want it to fall out.  

One of the most important steps when doing these kinds of wings is to bend the base a bit. Most backs are not 100% flat so put the wing base against you back and mark where on the base where a gap between the base and your back starts to show.
If the base is made of a thermoplastic you can just heat it up and bend it at the marking into the right angle. Otherwise, like for the base with aluminum, you can saw it of and reattach them again to create the right angle.
You can of course make the angling of the base before attaching the wings but I find it easier to do it after. 

When the base is done you can just stick it in to the top. I find that sticking it into the bra strap also helps the wings stay in place a bit better.

I personally love this method since you super easily can take the wings of and back on if you want to sit down or walk in a crowded hallway without worrying about people bumping into you wings.

~Bubblefish
(Photo at the top was taken by David Johansson)

10

The Prestige (2006)

Director - Christopher Nolan, Cinematography - Wally Pfister

“Every magic trick consists of three parts, or acts. The first part is called the pledge, the magician shows you something ordinary. The second act is called the turn, the magician takes the ordinary something and makes it into something extraordinary. But you wouldn’t clap yet, because making something disappear isn’t enough. You have to bring it BACK. Now you’re looking for the secret. But you won’t find it because of course, you’re not really looking. You don’t really want to work it out. You want to be fooled.”

4

Favorite Book to Film Adaptation: The Prestige by Christopher Priest


“The magician takes the ordinary something and makes it do something extraordinary. Now you’re looking for the secret… but you won’t find it, because of course you’re not really looking. You don’t really want to know. You want to be fooled.”

2

a marriage.

“Is Jonze reworking his own personal history? In his ex-wife Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation (where Coppola’s alter-ego is played by Johansson—a bizarre coincidence?), the husband (a music video director) is oblivious to his wife’s alienation. Her is an admission of that obliviousness and a lament for it.”

4

“There’s no way you’re telling me that thing back there is from earth!”

-Eight Legged Freaks (2002)

2

The Prestige (2006)

Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first
part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something
ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man. He shows you this
object. Perhaps he asks you to inspect it to see if it is indeed
real, unaltered, normal. But of course... it probably isn't. The
second act is called "The Turn". The magician takes the ordinary
something and makes it do something extraordinary. Now you're
looking for the secret... but you won't find it, because of course
you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You want
to be fooled. But you wouldn't clap yet. Because making
something disappear isn't enough; you have to bring it back.
That's why every magic trick has a third act, the hardest part, the
part we call "The Prestige".

Let’s be honest, if anyone on Tumblr met a hot celebrity, we’d think we would look like this:

But we would actually look like this: