darkstar

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I thought i should compile it for you guys since i figured someone might do that already.

The concept was to figure out a team of women maybe collected by a good Cassandra nova to be a very formidable force/ or to fight her, you choose.  I wanted characters who were powerful but had preexisting relationships but also shared an opposite personality. Like two different elemental, Two very different psychics, Two crazy sisters and allot of great personalities. Plus like oprah said…..Everyone gets a headpiece!  :)

Other mutants i wanted to use were Firestar and Shadow Cat Sprite coustume (pink) . I opted for Sunpyre cause i love japan and wanted some women from different countries

Also Huntress from DC would’ve work too.

Be on the look out for these guys at SDCC 2014 table HH20.

-Peter

Hi my name is Gerold Dark’star Dementia Raven Dayne and I have long silver hair with ebony black streaks (that’s how I got my name!) and red tips that reaches my mid-back and icy purple eyes like limpid tears and a lot of people tell me I look like Daemon Targaryen (AN: if u don’t know who he is get da hell out of here!). I’m related to Arthur Dayne but I wish I wasn’t because he’s a major fucking poser. I’m a Dornishman, but I I have pale white skin. I’m also a knight, and I live in a magical land in Westeros called Dorne. I’m of the night (in case you couldn’t tell) and I wear mostly black. For example today I was wearing a black leather doublet with matching armor around it and a black leather tunic, purple silk gloves and black combat boots.  I was walking outside the Water Gardens. It was snowing and raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of Oakhearts stared at me. I put up my middle finger at them.

anonymous asked:

Hey, what's your opinion of the Darkstar?

…I don’t think he’s that terrible a character?

Hear me out!

Gerold Dayne exists largely to highlight and draw out the worst in Arianne (and come Winds, maybe Obara as well), a function he performs ably. Yes, “I am of the night” is a groaner for the ages, although I’d say “I was weaned on venom” is worse. But those lines, along with his explicit threats against Arys and Myrcella, work for me as warning signs that Arianne ignores until it’s far too late.

A Feast for Crows is full to bursting with showy, arrogant pretty-boy villains; besides Darkstar, there’s Euron, Dareon, Lyn Corbray, Aurane Waters, and Lazy Leo Tyrell. This motif may be partially why Feast stands as the least loved installment of the series, as these baddies just seem so much less complex than, say, Tywin. Indeed they are, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t dangerous if mishandled, which I think is GRRM’s point. Every one of them is unleashed and/or empowered by someone else: Dareon by Jon, Aurane by Cersei, Corbray by Littlefinger, Lazy Leo by Marwyn, Euron by Aeron (via the kingsmoot, which legitimized and cemented Euron’s rule), and Darkstar by Arianne. In each case, the true focus is on what it says about the latter that they think they can control and/or rely upon the former.

Dareon openly hates the Wall and the Watch; he cares for nothing but his own gratification. He is a terrible choice both as a recruiter and as a companion for Sam, Aemon, and Gilly. That Jon sends him anyway is the first hint of the blind spots that will bring down the 998th Lord Commander: he does a shockingly poor job of reading his brothers, he simply assumes they will adopt his long-term perspective and doesn’t seem to care when they don’t, and he fails to internalize the lessons of the mutiny at Craster’s Keep (although to be fair, he wasn’t there).

Cersei is incapable of seeing anyone besides herself and Jaime as full, autonomous human beings; everyone else is either an obstacle to be removed or a lickspittle to be commanded, and she judges the latter purely on their surface. That Aurane Waters vaguely resembles Rhaegar is as far as her thought process goes. The idea that he is nothing like Rhaegar, but rather a conniving opportunist with no loyalty to her whatsoever, simply never occurs to her. Thus, along with many other defeats, she loses her fleet to Aurane, who like Dareon seizes the chance to get the hell out of Dodge.

Aeron, by contrast, knows exactly who what Euron is; he may be the only one with a tongue who does. But in a heartbreaking irony, the priest who speaks with his god’s booming voice cannot bring himself to say out loud what his brother did to him. Instead, he clings desperately to the kingsmoot as an avatar of eternal truth. The Old Way isn’t timeless, however; it’s a revanchist myth and a blatantly unsustainable organizing principle. Euron offers a way out: instead of subsisting on the mainland’s table scraps, let’s take the whole fucking table! The captains and kings choose the Crow’s Eye, and Damphair has no one but himself to blame.

Littlefinger uses Lyn Corbray to break his standoff with the Lords Declarant…and then promptly betrays him, wedding his brother Lord Lyonel to the daughter of a wealthy Gulltown merchant, presumably gaining both the groom and the bride’s father as benefactors at the cost of Lyn’s place in the succession at Heart’s Home. Yet Littlefinger doesn’t appear worried about potential backlash. This a major blind spot (one of many, a point to which I’ll return), assuming that institutional power is all that matters, when his own story really ought to have taught him what one amoral lesser noble with a chip on his shoulder can accomplish.

Admittedly, we’ve yet to learn the consequences of Marwyn bringing Lazy Leo under his wing, but given the Mage’s track record as a mentor (namely, Qyburn and Mirri Maz Duur), nothing good can come of it, especially with a racist bully like Leo.

And Darkstar? There are swift and bloody repercussions to Arianne’s assumption that his of-the-night attitude is a performance, a seduction, a harmless affectation that goes smashingly with his cheekbones, rather than being (as it truly is) representative of a deep-set cruelty. This is not a permanent fault of hers; I chalk it up to the fact that Arianne has been surrounded by friends, cousins, and lovers her whole life, and so unlike her father and uncle, she’s never really had to reckon with the concept of an enemy, especially one fronting as a friend. Her released Winds chapters reveal a much more self-aware Arianne, though she could still stand to adopt a bit of her father’s signature caution. But none of these aspects of her character would be as clear or compelling without the stark illumination Darkstar’s role provides.

Still, the question remains: why do these villains have to be so superficial? To answer that, I circle back to Littlefinger, the preening self-promoter against which all such must be judged. I’ve argued before that Petyr Baelish, while unquestionably intelligent and accomplished, isn’t quite the puppetmaster super-genius that his reputation suggests. Instead, in a truly masterful fashion, GRRM manages to push his character in two opposing directions at once, building him up as the behind-the-scenes instigator of the War of Five Kings while also unearthing his glaring weaknesses and leverage points. In lesser hands, Littlefinger might’ve dissolved into incoherence. GRRM, however, understands how best to undercut a villain, exposing them as not only immoral, but silly and shallow. The arrogant assholes of A Feast for Crows pose very real threats (especially Euron), but GRRM refuses to dignify them. He revealed Tywin to be a gigantic hypocrite at the end of A Storm of Swords, and the purposefully deflating approach to villainy in the following book flows tonally and thematically from the fearsome lion lord’s last moments, spent shitting.

So when Darkstar intones “I am of the night,” I don’t roll my eyes at the author; I giggle at this loser who thinks he’s a badass, desperately trying to escape his cousin Arthur’s white shadow by going all Nolan Batman on a deeply unimpressed ten-year-old. Evil is pathetic, and laughing at it can be a powerful weapon—and a necessary catharsis in what can be a very bleak series.