dance-moms

  • moms:melissa why did you say that just now
  • melissa:WHAT I DIDNT SAY ANYTHING THE LIES OMG
  • moms:melissa we just heard you say it two seconds ago
  • melissa:YOU DONT KNOW ME OKAY WHY ARE YOU SO JEALOUS OF A TWELVE YEAR OLD
  • moms:were not were literally talking about you as a human being
  • melissa:YOU KNOW NOTHING OKAY NOTHING I NEVER SAID THAT IM OVER IT IM SO OVER IT
  • moms:jesus why wont you own your words like are you really going to negate you just said that in front of all of us
  • melissa:ABBY THESE MOTHERS THEYRE GANGING UP ON ME AGAIN AND I CANT TAKE IT
On dance, competitive dance, and passion
  • It is perfectly normal and acceptable to be a dancer, even a competitive dancer, and take it seriously but not want it to be a “career.”
  • Losing your “passion” for dance isn’t always (or usually) some sort of great personal tragedy. Some people just outgrow hobbies.
  • The fact is, some people don’t want to be professional dancers because they’ll spend the entirety of their 20s working multiple jobs and struggling to get by before they hit 30 and realize they have to go back to school and start a new career because they’re too old and injured to get any of the jobs they used to, whoops.
  • No “little dancer” owes it to YOU to keep dancing just so you stay entertained by their YouTube videos.
  • In my opinion, if a dance teacher treats any of his or her students like they absolutely must stay in dance year to year or they should all aim for a professional dance career, they are being emotionally abusive and controlling. If they say that they only want to work with kids who want to be pro dancers when they’re older, they’re trying to decide a child’s future for them. Even their own parents shouldn’t be doing that.
  • It is perfectly acceptable to not win.
  • It is perfectly acceptable to not care if you don’t win.
  • It’s totally okay for kids to train at elite levels of training, but that doesn’t mean that every competition kid has to or wants to. It’s a HUGE investment, not just in money but in time, as well as a child’s physical and mental health. If a kid wants to go to some Dolly Dinkles competition twice a year and do a novice-level jazz solo and not spend 30+ hours a week training with three hip injuries before high school and absolutely zero time to spend with friends outside of their “dance family,” that is 100% okay.
  • Someone like Brooke Hyland (or Paige) leaving dance is not a tragedy. What is a tragedy is a child staying in dance because they were pressured by others. Kelly Hyland is a good mom for nurturing and encouraging her children’s potential but overall letting them make the choice for them to continue as dancers.