damian mcbride

It Is Time To Kick Prepping Into Overdrive, Because This Stock Market Crash Is Just The Beginning

It Is Time To Kick Prepping Into Overdrive, Because This Stock Market Crash Is Just The Beginning

End of the American Dream If you have not been preparing for what is coming, you need to get off your sofa and you need to start prepping right now.  Just remember what happened back in 2008.  That crisis took most people totally by surprise.  Millions of Americans lost their jobs, and because most of them were living paycheck to paycheck, all of a sudden most of them couldn’t pay the rent or the…

View On WordPress

His book could easily be subtitled “my struggle with truth”, because he poses – but doesn’t quite answer – the question that hangs over modern political life: When is it acceptable to lie? Late in the book, he explains his counterintuitive decision to start telling journalists the truth on election nights, about the results and the likely outcome. The more he told the truth, the more he came to be regarded as a reliable source of accurate information. And the more reliable he became, the easier it was for him to tell a lie, because no one suspected him. Telling the truth in order to become a better liar is a crude but accurate distillation of his working method.
nowtheendbegins.com
Former Gordon Brown Advisor Damian McBride Says 'Stock Up On Water, Market Crash Is Coming' ⋆ Now The End Begins
Damian McBride appeared to suggest that the stock market dip could lead to civil disorder or other situations where it would be unreasonable for someone to leave the house. “Advice on the looming crash, No.1: get hard cash in a safe place now; don't assume banks & cashpoints will be open, or bank cards will work,” he tweeted.
Stock up on canned food for stock market crash, warns former Gordon Brown adviser

Stock up on canned food for stock market crash, warns former Gordon Brown adviser

The Independent A former adviser to Gordon Brown has urged people to stock up on canned goods and bottled water as stock markets around the world slide. Damian McBride appeared to suggest that the stock market dip could lead to civil disorder or other situations where it would be unreasonable for someone to leave the house. “Advice on the looming crash, No.1: get hard cash in a safe place now;…

View On WordPress

Mr Wemyss on the decline of Britain in two paras:

THEN: Ornament of HM Civil Service with a vast capacity for invention and a gift for plausible fiction, whose memoirs (being stodgy) did his reputation no favours: Anthony Trollope.

NOW: Ornament of HM Civil Service with a vast capacity for invention and a gift for plausible fiction, whose memoirs (being penitent) went some way to restoring his reputation: Damian McBride.

I had a good root around in the rubbish [at No 10] to recover any serviceable books, stationery, and so on. My prize find was Tony Blair’s GQ Politician of the Year Award from September 2003, a lovely piece of slate and glass, which now sits on my mantelpiece at home.
—  Damian McBride
I’d been reading Ben Goldacre’s Bad Science in South America, and I’d come up with an idea that we would allow pharmaceutical companies to advertise prescription medicines in the UK, in return for which they would be obliged to sign a new code on publication of their research data: good news for the advertising industry, the media, Big Pharma and patients. That idea went in the bin.
—  Damian McBride
External image
Power Trip: A Decade of Policy, Plots and Spin
(Via Psythor)
Christopher Hitchens on Gordon Brown's chief political aide, Damian McBride

Christopher Hitchens wrote in August 2009 about Damian McBride, Gordon Brown’s answer to Andy Coulson:

“[Gordon Brown’s] Nixonian diagnosis has recurred to many minds… because of the discovery of a “dirty tricks” operation run at the very heart of Brown’s own government. “Filthy tricks” might be more like it: the prime minister’s chief political aide, a bloated and mediocre nonentity named Damian McBride, was found using official e-mail channels to spread the rumors that David Cameron, the leader of the Conservative Party, suffered from an embarrassing ailment; that his economics spokesman, George Osborne, had been caught with hookers and a dildo and photographed in drag; and so forth. (There was also a planted slur about Mr. Osborne’s wife that not even Rupert Murdoch’s tabloid The Sun was prepared to print.) This you might think was foul enough: using the taxpayers’ money to smear the opposition party with baseless insinuations. But what shocked me much more was how unshocked the Labour Party was. “Put it like this,” said a stalwart old comrade of mine. “The Tories and the press are only now finding out how Brown has been bullying and threatening his own colleagues.” Fat Boy McBride, of course, was given the heave-ho as soon as his picknose activity was unmasked, and it was claimed, as is customary, that he had acted alone and without permission from his boss.”

Vanity Fair Magazine, August 2009, here: http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2009/08/hitchens200908

Power Trip by Damian McBride: A review

I’m a sucker for a political tome about the New Labour years but unlike the many others I have read such as Alastair Campbell’s diaries or Lawnsley’s ‘End of the Party’, ‘Power Trip’ was definitely Team Brown.

Damian McBride was a key member of Brown’s inner circle, a civil servant who followed his boss fro the Treasury to Number 10. Nick-named Mad Dog, he was Brown’s key hatchet man and was a feared figure in the Westminster village. McBride lived by the sword and was certainly eviscerated by it, having been caught smearing political opponents in a notorious email (email-gate) he was ignominiously forced to resign and was cast out of Brown’s inner circle and out of Westminster.

Keep reading

Now, as then, the Treasury’s recruitment process for Fast Streamers specifies the minimum requirement of a 2:1 degree. Their current recruitment literature says: ‘We want to do everything we can to ensure that we reflect the society we serve’, but while the recruitment forms, tests and interviews will be daunting to many candidates, they would be routine to many others who made entrance applications to grammar school, private school or Oxbridge.
—  Damian McBride
External image
Power Trip: A Decade of Policy, Plots and Spin
(Via Andy Morwood)
Mr Wemyss believes Iain Dale to be wrong.

Not wrong to have attempted to move Stuart Holmes out of shot as Damian McBride was being interviewed on camera; rather, wrong to have apologised, and, particularly, to have said that Holmes ‘was perfectly entitled to do as he did on Tuesday in trying to get attention for his causes’.

Balls.

If one recalls the 2012 Boat Race and that swampy little LSE sod Trenton Oldfield…. Obviously, when he was first spotted, he was regarded as an unfortunate daftie in want of rescue. When he and it emerged that he was a deliberate disruptor engaged in a ‘protest’ as puerile as his politics, the Race ought to have been restarted with him in the water. As a target to be run down. He ran no risks in his protest: the ‘elitists’ he hates (a group of which he is himself a member) could be counted on to Do The Right Thing and save his worthless carcase; the only person injured by his appalling behaviour was the Oxford bow.

Setting out to cause potential harm to others invalidates any right of protest, and frankly deserves that harm be visited upon the one trying this sort of thing on. Morally, his actions were indistinguishable from an attempt, at least, at assault, if not indeed assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

Of course, amongst the defences in law to an allegation of assault is, commonly, the prevention of a crime.

Which brings us to Mr Holmes – no Sherlock he.

So far as the facts are clear, Mr Dale attempted to move Holmes on. The matter became a scuffle through Holmes’ resistance. Had Mr Dale a right to move Holmes on?

I should say that he did. And that he was in fact, whatever he now thinks – and I believe he sincerely thinks he was in the wrong – justified.

I don’t, actually, give a damn what Holmes’ cause is. He could as well have been waving a Better Off Out placard. Here’s the thing: Why do authors and their publishers set up interviews such as this? And why are interviewers interested?

The second question, in the case of news broadcasts, is obvious: the reporters and editors involved consider the story one of public importance. That some bugger with a dog who clearly doesn’t like him any more than the rest of us do, chooses to hijack that, is hardly an endorsement of his cause, whatever it may be and even if it be more than mere self-aggrandisement (pull the other one, it has a full ring of six on it). Blocking or diverting a news broadcast strike me, at least, as having the character of a public order offence, and I have no qualms about anyone’s intervening to stop such an offence.

But let us look at the first question. What is the purpose of a publisher’s putting an author before a news camera? Well, that’s obvious, isn’t it. To sell books.

Even if you were sufficiently nescient of economics not to know what opportunity cost is, you’d see at once where this leads, by inexorable logic. Holmes was engaged, not to put too fine a point upon it, in a form of theft. His actions were precisely equivalent, morally, to such economic crimes as hacking and DDOS attacks. It was his object to deprive Mr McBride and his publisher of economic benefit, in his own favour and to his own advantage, by hijacking a broadcast and depriving Mr McBride, and Biteback Publishing, of sales.

I don’t know that Mr Pyle – who did train as a lawyer (American): nothing on earth should have compelled me to have read Law at university – shall agree with me on this; but I am not at all uneasy in putting this view. We at Bapton Books, as publishers – and authors ourselves – are passionate supporters of free speech, as we have proven time and again. But there are lines that must not be crossed with impunity: and the spectacle of a publisher being given a police caution in these circumstances and giving an apology to a person whose actions are morally indistinguishable from simple theft, is squalid and contemptible. In my view, at least, speaking entirely in a personal capacity, it is Holmes who ought to have been down the nick.