daily-wild

Four-month-old orangutan Rizki is seen inside his cage at the Surabaya zoo in Indonesia on October 10, 2013. While this little fella appears to be doing fine, the same cannot be said for at least two of the other zoo’s other orangutans. On October 10, an orangutan named Betty died from what officials called an “inflammation of the lung,” the latest in a rash of suspicious animal deaths that have prompted calls to close the notorious facility, which the Indonesian media has dubbed the “death zoo.” Two weeks ago, another orangutan named Nanik died from an intestinal tumor at the facility. Typically, orangutans live between 50 and 60 years. 

[via]

A white lion licks a pumpkin filled with chicken at a zoo in Rhenen, Netherlands on September 19, 2013. In order to stimulate natural behavior of the animals, the zoo feeds them food which they have to work for. First documented in the late 1930s, white lions, are actually not albinos—their unusual colour is caused by a rare genetic mutation. According to the Global White Lion Protection Trust, only 10 of the rare beasts exist in the wild. Close to 300 live in the world’s zoos, however.

[via]

((I’m going to be out today, so drafts and memes in the inbox will have to wait until I get back!))

((In the mean time, you should all watch Gregory Horror Show because that is Xan’s aesthetic. I personally prefer volume two but that’s all subjective!))

Two Clydesdales, Duke and Barron, are walked underneath “The Kelpies,” a 30-meter-high sculpture outside Falkirk, Scotland, on Nov. 27. One of the United Kingdom’s tallest pieces of public art, the statue cost just under $7 million to build. Famous for being the mascot for Anheuser-Busch beer, Clydesdales on average stand 17 hands high and weigh 2,000 pounds. Derived from farm horses in Scotland, the breed is thought to be more than 300 years old.

[via]

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Spiritual Leader of the Great Sioux Nation, feeds a carrot to a carriage horse in New York City’s Central Park on November 17. Arvol hopes to reconcile the opposing views of ending Central Park’s horse and buggy ride. Newly elected mayor Bill Di Blasio is in support of bringing the iconic New York experience to an end. “The biggest, densest urban area in North America…is not a place for horses," said Di Blasio last month. "They are not meant to be in traffic jams.” Animal rights groups want to replace the hoof-powered carriages with eight-seat, electric-powered replicas of antique cars. The city’s horse carriage drivers say the motives of the activists are misplaced. “It’s all a bunch of hysteria,” said driver Christina Hansen. “They project their own emotions onto horses.”

[via]

A two-month-old tiger cub touches a rabbit during a test of the cubs’ wild natural instincts at a wildlife park in Qingdao, China on September 10, 2013. The meet and greet was part of the park’s body examination procedure done on recent-born tigers, lions and leopards. To answer your most pressing question, yes, the bunny escaped his play date alive and well. Actually, the tigers’ predatory insticts failed them, reports the Daily Mail: “The white rabbit simply jumped around their enclosure, eluding their grasping paws as it outpaced them.” And, at one point, the tigers actually shied way from the rabbit, even though he was only a fraction of their size.

[via]

There are approximately 2,000 Grevy’s zebras alive today and they live in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. They prefer semi-arid grasslands with a permanent water source and have been amassing in the south of their territory due to habitat loss. This species has rounded ears, a large head and neck, grows larger than any other wild equid, and foals like this one are born with rust-colored stripes that turn black.

A mahout rides his elephant during a protest in Thailand’s Ayutthaya Elephant Camp on October 24, 2013. Elephant owners and mahouts gathered in solidarity against the government’s plan to transfer the ownership of domesticated elephants to the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation. The group said the plan would damage their ownership and business.

[via]