d appleton

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Torquato Tasso (11 March 1544 – 25 April 1595)

Italian poet of the 16th century, best known for his poem Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem Delivered, 1581), in which he depicts a highly imaginative version of the combats between Christians and Muslims at the end of the First Crusade, during the Siege of Jerusalem. He suffered from mental illness and died a few days before he was due to be crowned as the king of poets by the Pope. Until the beginning of the 20th century, Tasso remained one of the most widely read poets in Europe. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: 1. Frontispiece “Tasso From a Portrait Engraved by Raphael Morgen” from The Jerusalem Delivered of Torquato Tasso. Translated into English Spenserian Verse, with A Life of the Author: By J. H. Wiffen. Third American from the last English Edition. Illustrated with Six Fine Steel Engravings. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1851.  2. Title page from Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered, An Heroic Poem. With Notes and occasional Illustrations. translated by The Reverend J. H. Hunt, A.M. In Two Volumes. Vol. I London: Printed for J. Mawman; By T. Miller, 1818.  3. Frontispiece “Torquato Tasso. Photogravure from the original painting by Wilhelm von Kaulbach.” 4. “Tasso at the Court of Ferrara. (Tasso reading “Jerusalem Delivered” to the Sisters of the Duke of Ferrara.) Photogravure from the original painting by Edouard Ender.” from Jerusalem Delivered By Torquato Tasso. Translated by Edward Fairfax. Edited by Henry Morley, LL.D. Revised Edition. New York: The Colonial Press, 1901.

John Wilson (18 May 1785 – 3 April 1854) 

Scottish advocate, literary critic and author, the writer most frequently identified with the pseudonym Christopher North of Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine.

He was professor of Moral Philosophy at Edinburgh University (1820–1851). (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Frontispiece “John Wilson. Engd. by W. G. Jackman” from The Recreations of Christopher North. Complete in One Volume. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1867.

The House of Strange Victims. Bertram Atkey. New York: D. Appleton and Co. 1930. First edition. Original dust jacket art.

“Sir Morgan Greare, well-known surgeon, is discovered to be exacting huge fees from his wealthy patients, who live in willing subservience to his every command.” An uncommon mystery with horror elements of a deranged doctor who turns his patients into his personal “slaves” by exposing them to a narcotic gas of his own invention.

“Katharine.  Taming of the Shrew, Act 2, Sc. 1.  Designed by F. P. Stephanoff. Engraved by C. Cook” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

The Green Mouse. Robert W Chambers. New York and London: D. Appleton and Company, 1910. Illustrations by Edmund Frederick as well as numerous black-and-white vignettes in the text. First edition. Original dust jacket.

“Light society romance about a down-on-his-luck electrical engineer who happens on an invention that ‘broadcasts’ the erotic essence of an individual, thus attracting its ideal complementary opposite." 

The Dark Star. Robert W. Chambers. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1917. First edition. Original dust jacket; art by W. D. Stevens.

World War One themed novel of intrigue and espionage. “Thrilling story of adventure based upon the work of the German and Turkish secret service and their attempts to recover the lost plans of the fortifications of Gallipoli.”

“Cassandra.  Troilus and Cressida, Act 2, Sc. 2.  Designed by K. Meadows. Engraved by W. H. Mote” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

On this day in history, December 8, 1660 – A woman (either Margaret Hughes or Anne Marshall) appears on an English public stage for the first time, in the role of Desdemona in a production of Shakespeare’s play Othello.

From our stacks: ‘Desdemona. Othello, Act 1, Sc. 3. Designed by J. Hayter, Engraved by H. Robinson’ from The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakspeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer. Illustrated with fine engravings on steel, from designs by eminent hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

#whimsical wednesday

From our stacks: “The deer, too, left Her delicate footprint.” Artist: Fenn. Engraver: Filmer. The Story Of The Fountain.  By William Cullen Bryant. Illustrated with Forty-two Engravings on Wood.  D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1871.

The Seven Seas. Rudyard Kipling. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1896. Cover design by Evangeline Mary Daniell. First American edition.

“We have fed our sea for a thousand years
And she calls us, still unfed. 
Though there ’s never a wave of all her waves
But marks our English dead :  
We have strawed our best to the weed’s unrest
To the shark and the sheering gull. 
If blood be the price of admiralty.
Lord God, we ha’ paid in full !”

“Joan of Arc.  King Henry VI, Part I, Act 1, Sc. 5.  Designed by E. Corbould. Engraved by G. Inglis” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

“Miranda.  The Tempest, Act. 1, Sc. 2.  Designed by K. Meadows  Engraved by W. H. Mote” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

flickr

Settling With the Cabby, about 1895 by Jim Griffin

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>


Entrance to the 34th Street Long Island Ferry

The New Metropolis, Edited by E. Idell Zeisloft,
New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1899.

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Here are some lovely copies of a few works by Robert W. Chambers. Robert W. Chambers was an American writer and artist, best know for his short story collection The King in Yellow.  The King in Yellow is considered a classic work of supernatural fiction, and was published in 1895. All of these copies were published in the early 20th century or late 19th century.

Chambers, Robert W. The Green Mouse. D. Appleton and Co. New York and London:1910.  Illustrations by Edmund Frederick. 

   Chambers, Robert W. Quick Action. D. Appleton and Co. New York and London: 1914.  Illustrations by Edmund Frederick.

Chambers, Robert W. The Green Mouse. Grosset and Dunlap. New York:  1906.  Illustrations by Edmund Frederick.

Chambers, Robert W. The Tree of Heaven. D. Appleton and Co. New York and London: 1907.  Illustrator unknown. 

Chambers, Robert W. The Mystery of Choice. D. Appleton and Co. New York:  1897.   Illustrator unknown.

Chambers, Robert W. The King in Yellow. Harper & Bros. New York and London: 1902.   Illustrator unknown.

-Laura