d appleton

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Edward Livingston Youmans. The Chemistry of Familiar Objects. 1855.

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Elizabeth Gaskell, (29 September 1810 – 12 November 1865)

Often referred to as Mrs Gaskell, she was an English novelist, biographer, and short story writer. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of the lives of many strata of Victorian society, including the very poor, and are of interest to social historians as well as lovers of literature. 

Her first novel, Mary Barton, was published in 1848. Gaskell’s The Life of Charlotte Brontë, published in 1857, was the first biography of Brontë. Some of Gaskell’s best known novels are Cranford (1851–53), North and South (1854–55), and Wives and Daughters (1865). (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: 1. Frontispiece from Wives and Daughters By Elizabeth C. Gaskell. With an Introduction by Clement Shorter. London, New York, Toronto and Melbourne: Henry Frowde, Oxford University Press, 1914?  2.-5. Cover and illustrations from Cranford by Mrs. Gaskell. Preface by Rev. Brooke Herford, D.D. Illustrated. Boston: Joseph Knight Company, 1891. 6. Title page from The Life of Charlotte Brontë, By E. C. Gaskell. In Two Volumes. Vol. I. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1857.

The Girl at Central. Geraldine Bonner. New York: The Macaulay Company, 1915. First Macaulay edition, first published by D. Appleton. Original dust jacket by Frederick Tomlan.

Molly Morganthau is the local switchboard girl, and has a bad habit of listening in to people’s phone calls – especially those involving Jack Reddy, upon whom Molly has a distinct crush. But Jack has eyes only for the flighty, flirtatious heiress Sylvia Hesketh.

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) 

American poet, novelist, and short story writer. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Cover detail from The Third Violet By Stephen Crane. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1897.

The Girl at the Window. Josephine Daskam Bacon. New York: D. Appleton and Co. 1934. First edition. Original dust jacket and illustrations by Clara Elsene Peck.

A rather pious story of a girl who – through her own selfishness – was hurt in an accident and spent many months as an invalid. From self-absorption to an interest in other people’s problems – and even a share in solving a kidnapping case, – so the story goes. Interesting enough, and the mystery will give a sales angle. – Kirkus

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Torquato Tasso (11 March 1544 – 25 April 1595)

Italian poet of the 16th century, best known for his poem Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem Delivered, 1581), in which he depicts a highly imaginative version of the combats between Christians and Muslims at the end of the First Crusade, during the Siege of Jerusalem. He suffered from mental illness and died a few days before he was due to be crowned as the king of poets by the Pope. Until the beginning of the 20th century, Tasso remained one of the most widely read poets in Europe. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: 1. Frontispiece “Tasso From a Portrait Engraved by Raphael Morgen” from The Jerusalem Delivered of Torquato Tasso. Translated into English Spenserian Verse, with A Life of the Author: By J. H. Wiffen. Third American from the last English Edition. Illustrated with Six Fine Steel Engravings. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1851.  2. Title page from Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered, An Heroic Poem. With Notes and occasional Illustrations. translated by The Reverend J. H. Hunt, A.M. In Two Volumes. Vol. I London: Printed for J. Mawman; By T. Miller, 1818.  3. Frontispiece “Torquato Tasso. Photogravure from the original painting by Wilhelm von Kaulbach.” 4. “Tasso at the Court of Ferrara. (Tasso reading “Jerusalem Delivered” to the Sisters of the Duke of Ferrara.) Photogravure from the original painting by Edouard Ender.” from Jerusalem Delivered By Torquato Tasso. Translated by Edward Fairfax. Edited by Henry Morley, LL.D. Revised Edition. New York: The Colonial Press, 1901.

The Green Mouse. Robert W Chambers. New York and London: D. Appleton and Company, 1910. Illustrations by Edmund Frederick as well as numerous black-and-white vignettes in the text. First edition. Original dust jacket.

“Light society romance about a down-on-his-luck electrical engineer who happens on an invention that ‘broadcasts’ the erotic essence of an individual, thus attracting its ideal complementary opposite." 

The Dark Star. Robert W. Chambers. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1917. First edition. Original dust jacket; art by W. D. Stevens.

World War One themed novel of intrigue and espionage. “Thrilling story of adventure based upon the work of the German and Turkish secret service and their attempts to recover the lost plans of the fortifications of Gallipoli.”

“Joan of Arc.  King Henry VI, Part I, Act 1, Sc. 5.  Designed by E. Corbould. Engraved by G. Inglis” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

‘Salammbo’, by Sinibaldi.

The Art of the World: Illustrated in the paintings, statuary, and architecture of the World’s Columbian Exposition

Ripley Hitchcock, ed.
New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1893.

“Katharine.  Taming of the Shrew, Act 2, Sc. 1.  Designed by F. P. Stephanoff. Engraved by C. Cook” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.

#whimsical wednesday

From our stacks: “The deer, too, left Her delicate footprint.” Artist: Fenn. Engraver: Filmer. The Story Of The Fountain.  By William Cullen Bryant. Illustrated with Forty-two Engravings on Wood.  D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1871.

“Cassandra.  Troilus and Cressida, Act 2, Sc. 2.  Designed by K. Meadows. Engraved by W. H. Mote” from  The Stratford Gallery; or the Shakespeare Sisterhood: Comprising Forty-Five Ideal Portraits, Described by Henrietta Lee Palmer.  Illustrated with Fine Engravings on Steel, from Designs by Eminent Hands.  New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1859.