What she says: I’m fine

What she means: Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer! Cancer!
Leafy is an asshole
Leafy is a retard
Leafy is an asshole
who bullies little kids
LeafyIsHere, Pyrocynical,
RiceGum and Keem Star
They are all retards
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer! Cancer!
RiceGum is an asshole
RiceGum is a retard
RiceGum is an asshole
who bullies little kids
LeafyIsHere, Pyrocynical,
RiceGum and Keem Star
They are all retards
I am the voice of the children!
My name is Misha
and I declare war to all cyberbully channels!
Stop bullying little kids!
These things need to end!
You are cancer!
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cyberbully channels are cancer! Cancer!
cancer cancer cancer
Cancer! Cancer!
cancer cancer cancer
Cancer! Cancer
cancer cancer cancer
Cancer!

Hey.

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Stop scrolling for a minute.

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Your existence matters. 

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You being here makes the world a better place. 

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You deserve good things.

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You’ll be okay.

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I love you very much.

.

.

.

—~ Please reblog this if it brightened your day. Someone who follows your blog may need a little light, too. :) ~—

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“We need to click with compassion… Just imagine walking a mile in someone else’s headline.”

Monica Lewinsky’s courageous TED 2015 talk on being patient zero of public humiliation online, why shaming isn’t only an act of violence between individuals but a massively exploitive business model for the media industry, and what we can do, together, to stop it. 

As Chris Anderson remarked when he introduced Lewinsky onstage, “Please don’t underestimate for one minute the courage it takes to give this talk.” 

Complement with some thoughts from yours truly on hope in the age of cynicism

PETITION TO FIND THE IP ADRESSES AND THEN PRESS CHARGES AGAINST THE HATERS

https://www.change.org/p/tumblr-find-and-press-charges-against-the-ip-addresses-responsible-for-the-hate-campaign-against-supernatural-fandom-members/share?after_sign_exp=client_upsells

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SHARE THE HELL OUT OF THIS AND SIGN THE PETITION!!!! 

Fat Shaming: Who Does It Benefit?

By Kristina Combs

Makeup: a way to self-express yourself and feel comfortable enhancing the skin that you are in—not for cosmetics company, Benefit.  

The company’s UK branch tweeted fat-shaming tweets on July 6th, claiming that they were just having some fun.  Sorry, but when did discrimination of someone’s body type become “fun"? I’m pretty sure that’s also known as bullying.

It took the company approximately two hours to release an apology tweet after many angry customers expressed how wrong it was of the company to do so.

Many customers threatened to boycott the brand (rightfully so!) and asked if Benefit would make some other jokes on current events, such as what is happening in Greece or if racism was trending would they jump on that and create offensive hashtags, the company had no comment.

Many customers, as well as UK beauty bloggers, have come up with the hashtag: #boycottbenefit.

The company’s “big mistake” has now cost them some of their sponsored bloggers,  resulting in a decrease in new product promotion, as well as global customer.

Body shaming is disgusting, as everyone is beautiful regardless of what a scale says. It’s sad that a cosmetic company felt the need to publically humiliate their fan base in order to fit in with “the trends”. Try embracing your customers, at every shape and size. That never goes out of style.

About this blogger: Kristina Combs is a native New Yorker who has a passion for helping others.  She received my B.A from Hunter College in May 2015 and will be attending Adelphi University School of Social Work in the fall. She started volunteering with NEDA’s Helpline in hopes to help support and empower individuals and their families who are affected by eating disorders and to let them know that they don’t have to go through this alone.  When she’s not volunteering or focusing on my studies, she enjoys spending time with my friends and family and blogging.

For more on fat shaming, check out:
Tinder Body Shamers, Just Don’t
Crop Tops Are For Every Body
Strength In Numbers: A Personal Story in Overcoming Cyberbullying

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Another STEM girl is 8th grader Trisha Prabhu from Naperville, Illinois.  She is a finalist in this year’s Google Science Fair for her new mobile app, entitled “Rethink.”  The Rethink app allows users to give a second thought to potentially harmful social media posts.  It works as an add-on that automatically sends a notice to the author to rethink his or her post, giving the user the chance to change or delete postings that could be considered cyberbullying.  Trisha’s inspiration stemmed from her own research, which indicated that teens “may not understand the potential consequences of their actions because the prefrontal cortex isn’t developed until age 25.”  In trials of her app, Trisha found that 93 percent of users with the app retracted their posts, proving that a second chance to rethink their words was enough to stop cyberbullying actions altogether.

What incredible things will you be doing in 2015?

anonymous asked:

what do you mean the stuff you read, like stuff being mean to alycia??

Yes, exactly. I’m still shocked and disgusted. Insults, death wishes… someone actually tweeted at her that they hope she gets cancer, and if that’s not bad enough, they apparently also sent her rape threats.

Now… these persons’ accounts seem to have been suspended, but it doesn’t matter. They sent those messages. Alycia saw them. The damage was done. And this is just so incredibly wrong and upsetting. This is cyberbullying, harassment. It’s a very serious matter that can have devastating effects, but is unfortunately almost always dismissed because 

“It’s just rude kids behind a screen, right?” 

“It’s not a big deal… At the end of the day, these are fans that are simply a bit too passionate, right?”

“It’s nothing serious. They are simply saying those things, words cannot do any actual harm, right?”

WRONG!!!

Words hurt. They can do damage. Sometimes they can affect someone more than if they were physically hurt. So yes, it is serious, and I’m incredibly angry that this is happening. To Alycia, out of all people. It doesn’t even matter, she could be a horrible person, and sending her things like those would still be completely wrong. But Alycia also happens to be the sweetest, nicest, most down-to-Earth girl ever. Anyone who knows her has nothing but wonderful things to say about her, and they always make remarks on her kindness and how lovely she is. Someone posted private pictures of her in the past, and instead of demanding that they would be taken down–and she had every right to do that–she made contact with the person who did this, politely asked that it wouldn’t happen again and apologized for not being very active on social media and promised to improve. This girl doesn’t have a single hate bone in her body. So why do people think it’s okay to send her hate and threats?

Is it because they don’t like the character she plays? Is it because she is famous, so they think that she’s asking for ANY KIND of attention?

Ok, first of all… she is an actress. Actress. Not writer. She is given lines to say and things to do and she does that. She may interpret certain things the way she wants, but in general she doesn’t have a lot of saying in what happens with her character. A fictional character. She just plays it. You don’t like Lexa? Fine. Instead of spending time hating on the character you don’t like, the actress who plays it, or the screenwriters who created it, use your energies to talk about what and who you love. Otherwise just shut up.

Second of all… Alycia is a young girl who was just introduced to this world of fame and attention, and she repeatedly stated she found herself to be overwhelmed by it. The fact that she is an actress doesn’t mean anything. As probably 99% of the actors out there, she does this job because she loves acting. Fame and attention simply come with it. It doesn’t mean she wants any of that, and it absolutely doesn’t mean she owes you anything. Just because she is in the public eye now, that doesn’t mean she lost the right to keep her privacy. So even continually pestering about why she is not often on social media is not okay. Not at all. 

She is uncomfortable with attention in general, imagine how she might feel receiving that kind of disgusting, horrifying ‘attention’. I don’t care if people don’t like her character, I don’t care if they don’t like her, I don’t care if they think they are entitled to say whatever they want to her just because she is a celebrity. THEY ARE NOT. She is a human being, not a plaything. She is an actual person, like all of us, and she has feelings, like all of us. And this… this hating, this harassing, needs. to. fucking. stop.

Think before doing something. It is that simple. Think that an actual person is going to read the things you wrote, and if you realize you wouldn’t like receiving the message you’re about to send DON’T. SEND. IT.

rethinkwords.org
ReThink - Effectively stop Cyberbullying

In the fall of 2013, Trisha Prabhu a 14 year old girl from Naperville, IL, read a story about the suicide of an 11 year old girl from Florida who had been repeatedly cyber-bullied by her classmates. She was shocked, heartbroken, and outraged. How could a girl younger than herself be pushed to take her own life? She knew, something had to change.

The result was ReThink! ReThink is a result of Trisha’s groundbreaking research aimed at training adolescents’ brains to make better decisions on social media.

Current solutions that social media have implemented are ineffective, following a STOP, BLOCK, TELL mechanism. Victims are asked to stop what they are doing, block the cyberbully, and tell a parent or guardian. Unfortunately, this approach doesn’t stop the damage before it’s done, places the burden on the victim to stop the cyberbullying, and research has found that 9 out of 10 victims don’t tell anyone that they are being targeted. They suffer in silence.

Trisha Prabhu wrote a program that stops bullies from bullying, rather than placing the burden on their victims, and apparently she can drop adolescent cyberbullying from 71% to 4% when it’s properly applied, without censorship or account suspension. Read more at the link above.

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ive seen so much hate in the fandom lately , so i wanted to give my contribution \ opinion.. Remember guys that if something \someone bothers you on the internet, you can always click the big X in the top right corner and turn off the computer and it will be all over, dont let stupid words on the internet get to you, 

inspiration from my fav childhood movie, Mean girls