cutting-patterns

Traditional Peasant Bread

30 g fresh yeast /11g dry yeast

500 ml warm water

2 tbsp honey

1 tbsp salt

600 g bread flour

Mix the yeast with warm water and honey (or according to package instructions) in a big bowl.

Add salt and then add most of the flour, making sure the dough does not turn dry, kneading at the same time. The dough should come off from the edges of the bowl and when stretched between four fingers, stretch easily to be paper thin (if it remains too wet, add some flour.).

Cover the bowl with moist towel and leave to raise in warm place for about an hour (if your house is very drafty this might take bit longer. You can encourage the raise by heating water in plate or tray in microwave or oven (on low heat) and then putting the dough in there to raise. Remember to turn off the oven!

After the dough has risen, bake on flour dusted surface into two loaves. Cut a pattern of your choise on the top of the loaves to bless or decorate them and flour the tops well. Let rest on top of baking tray for 30 -40 minutes, lightly covered with towel.

Meanwhile preheat the oven to 225 Celsius (437 F). When the breads are ready,  place tray of water into the bottom of the oven (this will make the crust of the bread nice and crunchy) and bake the breads in the middle of the oven for roughly 25 minutes.

Baked bread is beautiful and golden brown, and sounds “hollow” when you gently tap the bottom.

—-

This bread is nice and traditional bread that is easy to modify according to occasion with addition of herbs, nuts, seeds, dried fruits or grated beetroot or carrot… possibilities are endless.

You can use sugar instead of honey if you wish, but honey brings out nice and slightly malty flavor in bread, and makes the crust especially nice and golden colour. It is also symbol of prosperity, community, blessing and healing and can be used to sweeten people’s feelings towards you and others (great, for example, for those difficult family dinners!).

Traditionally the first cut of the fresh loaf is left out for home-spirit, one’s gods or just as a way to “give back to earth”.

I personally sing magic song for the bread while I leave it to raise to enchant the raising, but I am sure the bread raises perfectly fine if you choose not to do this step as well.

How to make arm wraps without actually using arm wraps!

So recently as some of you may know I had to figure out how to make these green arm wraps in the picture below

I wanted them to be one piece so that they wouldn’t have to be adjusted throughout the day if parts decided to slip, especially since the original plan was to tuck the shirt into them, *edit: l guess it should be added that we wanted something that not only wouldn’t have to be adjusted but something that wouldn’t have to be wrapped and was made of a more durable cloth like material.* I searched the internet for a while but couldn’t find anything too helpful so I decided to make it up as I went along and took pictures so I could share in the event it worked. (It did)
This process should work for just about any wrap you want to create for instance things like this as well…

There isn’t much to it but I took a lot of pictures, so here we go.
First things first, you’ll want to wrap what ever part of your body you are making the wrap for in plastic wrap (we use this method frequently). Mine was just the forearm so it looked like this

Then wrap it again in tape, masking tape works nicely.

After that you want to draw where the seam is going to be and cut along it like so

Once you have the piece disconnected from your body you want to flatten it, I placed my piece under a pile of binders for about a day

While you are waiting you can get started on the strips of fabric you’ll be using later. Figure out how thick you want the bands to look and measure them out of the fabric you are using

Don"t forget to add a seam allowance, like I did. The length of the strips doesn’t really matter right now, as long as it’s long enough to wrap around your arm once you should be fine. I cut out 12 to be on the safe side. You should have something like this.

Once I had the strips cut out I folded the seam allowance over on all of them, this made it easier later when I attached them to the main piece.

You can then put the strips to the side and go back to the main pattern piece. For the forearm it should look something like this once flattened

You’ll want to clean up the edges with the plastic hanging off and then transfer the pattern piece onto a piece of paper, again making sure to add seam allowance around the edges.

Once you’ve traced around the whole thing you can cut it out and that will be the pattern for the main piece of your arm wrap. Use the pattern to cut out a piece in the fabric you are using and together with your straps your pieces should look like this.

You want to sew on the strips one at a time, starting from one end then making your way to the other. I started from the bottom. Pin the strip onto the main piece along the hem you already created like this

You then want to sew the strip down along the top and bottom edge. There will be fabric hanging off from the strip, you want your seam to stay in between the edges of the main piece. After that is sewn on cut off any extra material from the strip.

It should look something like this

Continue with the other strips. I attached mine diagonally for the most part. When I was done attaching my strips (I only used 6) this is what I had.

Sew your side seams together.

And then hem the top and bottom.

Viola! You should have an arm (body) wrap that you won’t have to wrap!

(I didn’t hem the top because I attached it directly to the shirt)
Also it should be noted stretch material should probably be used. 
Hope it helps someone! :)

Lauren isn’t expecting much from her twenty second birthday. All the important milestones had already passed, all of them leaving her empty handed. No Hogwarts letter had arrived on her eleventh birthday, no mermaid tail had appeared on her thirteenth. The enormously prophetic sixteenth year – the year famously known for having destinies foretold, for being kidnapped by gods, for falling into a ridiculous love triangle – had come and gone with nothing of note. The most magical part of her twenty first birthday had been that’d she’d manage to consume that amount of alcohol without dying

No grand epics begin on the day of someone’s twenty second birthday.

This is because of those unlucky enough to be chosen at this tender age – most don’t ever make it back.

Dead men tell no tales, after all.

~

(Dead women do. The bones and bubbling corpses of hundreds of daring, unfortunate women are screaming warnings and fury at the next girl to join their ranks of the lost and forgotten.

But no one listens to a woman’s screaming.

No one will listen to your screaming either.

Sorry, dear. )

~

She wakes up and goes to the bathroom to get ready for the day.

This is a hasty decision, of course, although she does not know it at the time.

This may be her last morning. If she’d known, maybe she would have savored it. Snuggled into her warm sheets, pressed her face into the softness of her pillow, pulled the comforter about her bare shoulders, the most instinctual and simple of comforts.

But then again. Maybe not.

There is also an instinctual, twisted pleasure in ripping off the bandaid.

Keep reading

And here it is…the full, finished piece. My pièce de résistance.

What I started at the beginning of February has finally come to a close. Definitely the longest I’ve spent on any costume. Every bead hand sewn. Every piece of gold bullion hand cut and sewn. Everything patterned by me.
It might not be perfect in a couple small spots, but I am so in love with it. I can’t wait to get my wig and makeup on.

So few people cosplay Faramir, and even fewer do the coronation look. Most just sew on a pre-made trim, and for damn good reason!! I say “most” like I’ve seen more than like two cosplayers with this costume, but I’m so happy to be a part of that small group and to portray Faramir and to try to do this costume justice. He deserves so much more love!

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I Made a Bison*-with-Headphones Out of Paper

I made some other Sherlock-y type paper projects, too:

A friend in case I need someone to talk to,

a replica of the black origami lotus from TBB in case I need to let someone know they are marked for assassination,

an origami deer-stalker cap (shown here lined with tin-foil and modeled by Archimedes), 

and a “Persian slipper” (khussa) color, cut, and paste project (I keep nicotine lozenges in mine.)

I’m told there will be an arts-and-crafts room @221bcon this year, and I plan to bring supplies and materials for the origami lotus, tin-foil lined deer-stalker, and Persian slipper to share**.

The bison* skull is my original work and I reconfigured the human skull so I can print, score, and cut the pieces for both with a scrapbooking machine***. If anyone is interested in attempting to assemble their own human or bison* skull, I would love nothing more than to give that brave person or persons**** the instructions and printed, scored, and cut cardstock to make a skull. 

Unfortunately, I am emotionally fragile and terrified of preparing supplies for twenty or so skulls that no one wants. So, I am posting this in an attempt to gauge interest. If you are going to 221bcon and you want to attempt one of the skulls, reply to this post to let me know. (If you are not going to 221bcon and you are really interested in making the bison* skull, let me know anyway and I can email you the pdf or possibly snail mail you the printed, scored, and cut pages.)

Finally, if you read this far and you are not embarrassed on my behalf I would appreciate any signal boost you are willing to give by reblogging this post. Thank you.


   * I spent a lot of time looking at bovine skulls and I’m fairly certain it’s actually a yak skull, not a bison.
  ** I figured these are relatively easy projects suitable for all ages. I intend to find some safety scissors and washable markers instead of only bringing the pointy scissors and sharpies I have lying around.
 *** I don’t want to say the brand name. There’s nothing wrong with scrapbooking, but I just never saw myself as the kind of person who buys a cr!cut. I did, though. I bought one for the sole purpose of cutting out peppakura/papercraft patterns. I’d feel bad, but it’s too awesome.
**** Up to 12 people who are interested in the bison skull and 20 people who are interested in the human skull. 

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Patterns, refs, and more+

So this con season I made myself Pidge and a Shiro paladin costumes to wear, with pretty good results. The worst part of it though was the amount of time I spent drafting patterns, so I figured this might be a good resource for anyone else looking to make armor in the future.

This is all based on my measurements (a 5′1″ average-ish build with… bigger thighs), so you’ll likely need to make adjustments to have this fit yourself, but hopefully this makes building your own cosplay a little easier. Materials, patterns and everything under the cut. Hope it helps!

Keep reading

Enneagram Type’s Childhood

Enneatype 1

Children with the One pattern try hard to be good. They have an unconscious feeling of needing to justify their existence. They became their own disciplinarians and often the discipliner of other siblings.

One or all authority figures are either inadequate, not present, or too demanding and punitive. When the parent is not present, they decide to make their own rules and moral code. When the parent is too punitive, they internalize these rules.

They feel deep guilt, intrinsic inner flaw, and try to cover it up with an identity of being good and responsible. They can perceive others as having less integrity, being lazy and messy.

Enneatype 2

Children with the Two pattern learn to put other’s needs first - to give in order to receive - and that love must be earned. They try to read the needs in the family and see how they could fulfill them.

They often learn to please the opposite sex parent and this becomes a special relationship, which causes a difficult relationship with the same sex parent. It also leads to a triangulation, which is often carried out in adulthood.

Enneatype 3

Children with the Three pattern do not feel valued for themselves. They get praise for what they do and become productive to get this praise.

They often unconsciously adapt themselves to become what the nurturer wants them to be. They often pursue a career that may make their nurturer proud of them.

They have a deep feeling of shallowness and deceit, their insides do not match the image they have created.

Enneatype 4

Children with the Four pattern feel different than their parents. They believe they are not seen by their parents.

There is the feeling that they were kicked out of the nest because there is something tragically wrong with them. Often there is some event that changes the family structure and stands out as the event that changed everything.

Some remember a time when everything was wonderful and a moment when they were rejected for no apparent reason. They spend their childhood trying to regain love by being special.

Enneatype 5

Children with the Five pattern feel unsafe in their families. They experience their families as intrusive and overwhelming. There is no privacy, no where to hide except in their minds.

They experience the emotional needs and expression of their parents as invasive. Some create an inner fantasy world.

Enneatype 6

Children with the Six pattern experience their parents as inadequate and unable to protect or care for them well. Early in childhood they feel safe, as they get older something happens that makes them perceive their parents as inadequate.

Usually this occurs during the phase of separating when they need a strong parental figure to show them what is and isn’t safe about the world. At this time they experience parent(s) as inadequate - absent, unavailable, weak, etc.

Enneatype 7

Children with the Seven pattern feel cut off from the nurturer, causing frustration and anxiety. They feel there was not enough love for them in the family.

Sometimes there is someone needier who requires more attention. Sometimes the nurturer is distracted by emotional pain to give to all the children.

Their role is to be positive, not need much, and help everyone be happier, particularly the nurturer. As adults they often have a close bond with their mothers.

Enneatype 8

Children with the Eight pattern grow up quickly for a variety of reasons. There is violence in the family or around the family. The protector is missing and they must protect and provide for the family at a young age.

They survive in bad neighborhoods - survival issues are important. It is not safe to be gentle or giving, that seems weak and soft. They feel rejected/betrayed and learn to be tough.

Enneatype 9

Children with the Nine pattern feel overwhelmed by their families. They try to disappear and/or make peace. They dissociate from drama by becoming invisible or mediating.

They are very low maintenance. They learn that having needs, getting angry, or having difficulties is not acceptable. They lose energy and become listless.

7

Sparrow Hood! I finally gave up on ever seeing Mattel make a Sparrow hood doll. So I decided to make one of my own. Though he’s not perfect, and I do believe that Sparrow really could have used his own face mold, I will take what I can get with Mattel slowly winding down EAH. Sparrow was made using a Dexter doll. He was re-rooted using several different shades of orange/reds/browns. His jeans and jean vest are both make from a very thin stretch jean material (the jean material was way easier to work with the leather type material). The pants were made from a pattern purchased from RequiemArt, and the vest was make using a pattern I constructed. All this buttons and studs were hand glued on…and I have to say it took forever. I included an extra piece to the sleeve of the vest, so the extra piece would fray, creating a look similar to the animation. I hand printed his t-shirt using paint and stamps to get some kind of pattern that was as close as I could get to the webisode look. All his accessories are constructed of Fimo clay, with some having studs glued on. I have to thank @kara-relm and @wscttfrbs-eah for the help with Sparrow’s pins. I’ve never painted so small in my life so hope I did them justice ;) His boots are not show accurate, but I only had a pair of Hunter boots to work with so I made them as close as to the animation as possible. His belt is made using a faux leather, and is attached together with Velcro in the back, making it adjustable. I don’t even want to talk about the making the hat…lets just say it was a pain in my….. Now onto his guitar. I used a MyFroggy video for the basic construct idea (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIpXisS0OPc&t=154s), made a pattern, cut out a lot of card board pieces, glued them all together, painted on the details, and ended up with a pretty light and show accurate guitar I hope you all like him. He was actually really fun to make and I’m so happy to have added him to my collection.

anonymous asked:

Heya, so I was wondering how exactly do you finish off the edge of a mouth on a toony suit? I haven't seen a single tutorial or guide explaining it anywhere. Do you sew the fur over the top of a glued lining? Or the other way around? Or get an extra piece of mouth fabric and make a lip? Or sew the two pieces together, slip it on the head and somehow glue it down?

I have only recently mastered this after … gosh, however many years I have been making costumes. It has taken a lot of research and development to get myself to this point. So I appreciate credit, but also sincerely hope y’all have a chance to chip in to my Patreon if you get the chance, it will continue to encourage my innovation and show me you appreciate these sort of replies – in a financially supportive way!


I pattern my fursuit heads to have a liner that is non-balaclava based. That means I build my foam head shapes first, hollow them as much as I can, and then tailor a liner to fit the interior. This liner I sew from quilted broadcloth, and then I use either lycra ironed to interfacing or anti-pill fleece for the mouth lining/eye lining(sometimes I add in lining for ear vent holes and the neck as well). For someone making their own head, you can make a tape pattern of half of the interior, mirror it, and then tailor a liner based off that.

Tip: Save that primary liner pattern, it generally can be revised for each new head for a custom fit. As you make more heads you get a better sense of what needs revised about it. I save almost all my patterns and revise them for use on future masks and it saves me a lot of time so I don’t have to repeat tasks from scratch, and I can learn more from it each time.

Here is the start of my liner – before I add ear vents and before I add the neck and mouth on – This is the general shape I have saved and tailor or revise for use in future heads.

When I get to the mouth – the part that was asked about! I carefully tape-pattern the desired mouth shape, it gets cut out with a very small margin since I hand-sew the fur to mouth (I will describe this a little later). Be sure to sew anything that needs sewn directly to the liner, including any other accessories – like teeth & tongue (they can also be marked out on the tape pattern)!

You can (sort of) see even the mouth corners are patterned in, too. Those are the triangular-looking extra pieces coming off the left and the right. This liner & teeth & velcro for the tongue is all machine-sewn up to this point.

The time I install the liner comes before I fur the mask. Its crucial! First I pin it in place as a “dry fit,” sometimes I do another revision step once I see it all together. Once finalized, then I start gluing down all the easy-to-glue loose edges (I use hot glue).

When I need to glue down an interior segment I cannot reach easily: I cut a small slice in the foamwork, fit the glue tip in to reach the liner, glue the liner through the slice and then squirt a bit more glue to close that slice in the foam right back up. When gluing down the mouth leave a margin of unglued area around the edges – those will be sewn.

This is the glued down interior. I have also cut openings for my eyes and very large ear vents (those are BIG but well-hidden in the “C” curve of my ear’s base, btw.)

Tape pattern the rest of your critter for your fur. Measure your pattern, order your fur, and when it arrives cut your pattern and sew it up however you wish. Leave the jaw separate from the face, it will be easier to attach to the liner.

Use a blanket stitch or similar to sew your jaw fur on! Matching thread color to fabric is important, as it may show.

The end result is very clean once turned right side out.You can see on my upper mouth where I left the edge unglued to instead be sewn. The top jaw and mouth corners, too, were sewn in this way.

You can also use this technique to sew the inside liners of ears or other areas that need a smooth edge but may call for separate treatment from the rest of the head. 

Happy crafting! For more costume tutorials, visit my website Matrices.net

A lot of people don’t believe me when I say that I’ve only been sewing for a little over 3 years. Previous to that I had only really ever sewn plushies, pajama pants or pillows during Guide Guide workshops aka I could put fabric through a machine and sew in (sort of) straight lines but not much else. I had never used a clothing pattern before, I had never used anything other than a basic straight stitch, and I had never bought fabric. October 2012 was the first time I ever sewed any garments completely from scratch and those were my Fushimi from [K] vest and coat and now this October (2015) I will be competing at the Master’s level for cosplay craftsmanship. So I figured I’d give a short rundown of how I taught myself how to sew and how I improved.

1) I watched a lot of Project Runway (the earlier seasons… Annnndreeee, where is Annnndreee?). While this didn’t help much in actual sewing, it got me familiar with a whole lot of terminology and types of fabric and outfits. Plus it also showed me where people tended to take shortcuts and when those shortcuts tended to fail. 

2) I got a very basic sewing machine and I READ THE ENTIRE USER MANUAL. I started off on a Singer Simple which was a gift from my parents (who actually bought it 2 years earlier but never gave it to me thinking I’d never use it… HA!) and I went through every single English page of that user manual. I became familiar with all the parts of my machine, how to thread it, how to change bobbins, how to clean it, how to fix jams, all the different stitch types, and I practiced sewing a bunch of random stitches on scrap pieces of fabric just to see what they looked like and how they changed when I changed different tension settings.

3) I got a basic sewing book (from like 1965… it’d probably better to get an updated/current book) that acted as a glossary of sewing terms. I had no idea what 50% of the stitches I needed to use were called so this became very useful later when I bought my first pattern.

4) I bought my first patterns and chose something fairly simple to start off with which was a lined vest (followed by an immensely more difficult jacket). I went with Simiplicity patterns after doing a lot of googling for the most new-user-friendly patterns.

5) Then I FOLLOWED THE PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS. It seems like an obvious step but even now I sometimes skip a step and then later regret it. Everything the pattern said I needed, I bought. I bought the specific types of fabric, interfacing, thread, buttons, I did not deviate from their suggestions for the first trial run. Then I read through the pattern instructions, cut out all the corresponding pieces for my size and got to work. The key was to work slowly and re-read things as I went. I also used my sewing book and google to help better explain some of the instructions that were not 100% clear to me just starting out. I also looked up youtube video tutorials on how to iron seams, sew darts, properly clip curved edges, sew button holes, and finish inside seams. Research, research, research!

6) To re-iterate: TAKE YOUR TIME. Slow and steady wins the race. It took me probably a solid 4 days to sew a very simple vest that would probably take me maybe a couple hours now but damn it was one of the cleanest looking vests I had ever sewn. I made sure not to rush anything and gave myself lots of time.

7) I kept practicing. The more I sewed, the more familiar I became with how garments were put together and where I could change things to better fit my size or how to alter things to better fit the garment I was trying to create. I experimented whenever I could on scrap fabric to see what would and would not work for stitching and ironing.

3 years later and I can now draft my own patterns and sew dozens of different types of garments with dozens of fabric types. I would attribute 90% of my learning experience to taking it slow at first and researching as I went. I didn’t allow any guesswork on the first couple of projects I worked on because how would I ever learn if I didn’t look into how something was properly done? Google, youtube, tutorial blogs (wink wink), reference books, and pattern instructions are you friends, do not take them for granted. 

Pictured at the top on the left is the first Kirishiki vest I (rush) sewed in July 2012 without following instructions and trying to do it myself. The vest on the right is from December 2012 after I decided to take my time and follow instructions and actually learn while I was sewing. You can improve 100% just by taking your time, doing some research and following the instructions.

Bonus: What I bought for my sewing starter kit

  1. A green rotary/cutting mat. They can be really expensive but I have been using my large mat for 3 years straight and it works wonders at not only protecting the surface you are working on, but giving you a nice sturdy pinning and cutting surface that is self-healing and doesn’t get destroyed by pins and exacto knives.
  2. 1 large and 1 small pair of orange handled sewing scissors.
  3. A 6" x 24" clear sewing ruler.
  4. A pack of white/blue fabric pencils.
  5. A box of standard pins, plus a pin cushion.
  6. A pack of extra bobbins.
  7. A pack of standard sewing needles for hand-sewing.
  8. A pack of standard sewing needles for my machine.
  9. An iron and mini ironing board. 

Happy sewing!

-Heather

Faux Cuffs and Collar Tutorial

Hello everyone!

This is a tutorial to make a detached collar and (faux) French cuffs. I intended this to be for Playboy Bunny-style costumes, and that’s a good use for them, but I can see people wanting to make these for fashion purposes or other costumes, as well. 

The collar is functional and buttons at the neck, and the cuffs are functional but use a snap on the inside and decorative buttons sewn to the outside to imitate the look of cufflinks. This makes them easier to deal with during a con day and makes it easier to either make custom “cufflinks” or to use what you have in your sewing stash rather than buying or attempting to make actual cufflinks.

Keep reading

10

I’ve been into Yona of the Dawn for the past three years, but its only this year that I’ve decided to cosplay from one of my most favorite series!! I started out with Lili and Yona’s fancy cover art illustrations, and then I decided to crunch three more Yona costumes in a week for an upcoming con. I swear I’m usually better about pacing myself but I got pretty swamped with my friend’s wedding earlier in the month and I was left with a week to finish three Yona cosplays for Colossalcon this year.

Literally the only reason these got finished was thanks to the endless support of @automb @nana-cai and @tomyo!! They helped with ironing and pinning and the simple sewing so I could focus on draping my patterns, crafting, and keeping my wits together.

I know my cosplay compilation posts tend to get really chatty and long so I’ll put the rest under a read more!!

Keep reading

red vs. blue in The Lying Detective

(AKA: A Study in Scarlet)

While watching TLD, I found that I kept noticing little flashes of red, almost continuously. It wasn’t as in-your-face as the blue of TST, but it was still pretty prominent, kind of like how pink/purple is used a lot in ASIP. So I decided to go through and count how many times red pops up. (The answer: a lot.)

Keep reading

Plumbob Headbands

For this past Indy Pop Con, my friends and I chose to do a simple cosplay day and two big days.We wracked out brains on what to do as a group when the idea of Sims popped up. Sure it’s been done so many times, but that’s because it’s a fun cosplay to do. Who doesn’t want to run around, speak gibberish, and sometimes pass out from sleep deprivation? I know I wanted to. There are probably plenty of tutorials on how to make the glowing green plumbob above our beloved Sims’ heads but I figured I’d add to the pile and show you all how I made mine. Now enough jabbering, let’s do this.


Materials:

     Cardstock paper (any color)

     Hot glue

     Headband

     Acrylic paint in plumbob green

     Wood filler and sandpaper (optional)


Step One: Pattern Making

     As all of my tutorials begin, start with your pattern. Usually we make patterns to avoid unnecessary mistakes on foam, but this time we’re doing it to make sure the plumbob halves are the same. Plumbobs have six faces on the top and bottom and I added little tabs to help with gluing later.

Step Two: Cutting

     Make two halves from your pattern and cut them out.

Step Three: Folding

     This step is pretty self explanatory.

Step Four: Gluing

     Glue all the little tabs and assemble

Step Five: Wood Filling (optional):

     This part doesn’t need done but I think it improves the final product. You’ll notice that just gluing leaves some nasty gaps in your precious plumbob. With a bit of wood filler and sanding once the filler dries, you can smooth out your plumbob to your liking.

Step Six: Paint

     Now’s the time to coat the plumbob in a layer or two of your green paint. I chose a kind of electric green that I thought matched the plumbob pretty well.

Step Seven: More Gluing

      Now the time you’re been waiting for, gluing your plumbob to your headband. Just a warning, although the plumbob is just cardstock, it’s still pretty heavy for gluing with such little surface area. Since the plumbob comes to a point, there’s little for the glue to hold the thing up with so it becomes top heavy. I found that three or four layers of hot glue helps to fix this up nicely.

And you’re done! I know this tutorial was super short but I hope you still enjoyed :)

Here’s some pictures of my friends and I accepting our lives as Sims at the con. We changed the paint a bit and filled the cracks in better right before the con began.

The last two were taken from Instagram, credit to those who posted them (I don’t think they’d want me to put their Instagram names on here so I won’t, but thank you to both of them for snapping and posting these)

Spandex Applique Process

This is my personal technique for appliqueing on stretch fabrics. It’s a little different than what I might recommend for everyone–I have to work ‘upside down’ or from the back of my pattern because my machine just loves to drag the spandex around if I stitch on the right side of the work. But, I find this way does give nice clean results, so try it out, maybe! The biggest con would be that it does waste a little fabric when your cutting things away, but spandex patterns generally use pretty small yardages anyway.

So first thing is to transfer your design to the interfacing. I’m using Pellon Stick-and-Washaway 542 interfacing and it’s pretty much the best thing I’ve discovered recently. It’s water soluble, so you’re not tearing away interfacing and causing ripples in your spandex. Don’t forget to mirror your design!

Roughly cut out the interfacing, then peel of the backing and attach to your base fabric. Now that it’s nice and firm with the interfacing, you can cut out the pattern piece more precisely, with none of the shifting that often happens with spandex. I’ve then gone ahead and used temporary spray adhesive to attach a layer of red to the right side of my work (you can see it sticking out in the armhole of the bottom piece. Because there is a lot of red, I just covered the whole piece. The excess will be cut away later.

This is on a different piece, but here me zig-zagging on the wrong side of the work, following the lines drawn on the interfacing. I got pretty good at circles and curves on this one, and the biggest advice I can give is ‘Pivot. A Lot.’ You’re going to have to put the needle down and pivot every couple of stitches on a circle or other tight curve. Don’t try and just swing the stiching around as you go, it doesn’t work well. 

Okay, so I forgot to take a picture of me cutting away the extra fabric on the red layer, but as you can see here, I’ve added and stitched a green layer and am starting to cut it away. Just use sharp little embroidery scissors and gently tug the fabric, getting as close to the zig-zagged edge as you can. It takes a little practice, but I’ve gotten pretty good at getting nice clean edges this way. As you can see with the green fabric, if that color’s design is not all over the piece, you can attach smaller pieces of fabric, just making sure it covers  the whole area where it is needed. 

Here’s the back after all the green and red stitching is done. Now time for pink! As you can see, I attached the red centers to the pink flowers already. It’s easier to put them on first with the rest of the red, then cut out the pink center of the flower (like reverse applique) then to go back and do another layer of red. Changing the bobbin and thread between each layer is a pain.

Here you can see the pink attached, it’s used in small areas so I can get away with using small pieces to reduce waste.

No pictures of this step, but once you’re all trimmed up, go ahead and rinse the work in cold water, and the interfacing will magically dissolve, leaving you with nice smooth applique.

This is all the pieces laid out after being washed out. Before I sewed them all together though, there was one more step.

To reduce bulk (especially where it will be serged together) I cut away the cream base fabric where there was large open areas of the red. In smaller areas I would say it’s not worth it. I did cut the center of the flower away too, just because I ended up with three layers of fabric there. 

Ta-Da! All sewn up (and lined and what not) More pictures HERE!