cultural-movement

10

Remember, just because you once went to a quinceañera or traveled to Cabo for spring break doesn’t mean you understand the Mexican culture and it gives you absolutely no right to use the culture as a costume.

And look, I totally get it — Cinco de Mayo is a perfect excuse to unwind during the week and drink with friends, but just take a little time to learn more about the culture and holiday you’re celebrating. Read more (Opinion)

follow @the-movemnt

9

Do Ho Suh: Passage/s

I see life as a passageway, with no fixed beginning or destination. We tend to focus on the destination all the time and forget about the in-between spaces.” ~ Do Ho Suh

Inspired by his peripatetic life, Do Ho Suh has long ruminated on the idea of home as both a physical structure and a lived experience, the boundaries of identity and the connection between the individual and the group across global cultures. Meticulously replicating the architecture of the places in which he has lived and worked, such as his childhood home and Western apartments and studios, Suh’s one-to-one scale translucent fabric structures give form to ideas about migration, transience and shifting identities. 

These ideas are further conveyed in his Hub works, where transitory, connecting spaces between rooms, such as vestibules and corridors, speak metaphorically about movement between cultures and the blurring of public and private, as well as reflecting on the passage of the artist’s own life, and the experience of a person who has developed roots in multiple countries. “I see life as a passageway, with no fixed beginning or destination,” says Suh. “We tend to focus on the destination all the time and forget about the in-between spaces. But without these mundane spaces that nobody really pays attention to, these grey areas, one cannot get from point a to point b.”

Follow the Source Link for image sources and more information.

When to Cast a Spell - By Time of Day

my personal correspondences by time of day, complied form my grimoire.

dawn - breaking curses, beauty and glamour spells. weather and sea spells. magic involving delicate feelings, friendship and forgiveness, budding romance.

morning - fertility, good luck, green/herbal witchcraft. best time to brew potions. intuition and justice. 

noon - wealth and career spells. success and motivation. confidence and courage spells. kitchen magic.

afternoon - the time to gather herbs. communication spells. travel protections. 

evening - psychic protections, peace/balance spells. kitchen spells and pop culture spells

twilight - catalysts, movement and growth. astral travel and divination. love/lust spells. technology witchcraft.

evening -  curses, hexes, banishment, bindings. space and cosmic magic. dream magic. hedgecraft

midnight - creativity, switching between realms. spirit work, liminal spaces, reaching through the veil.

Whoever is saying “Pop occulture means society won’t take us seriously” is missing the whole point of Paganism being a counter-cultural movement.

Seriously, society already thinks we’re nuts for worshiping many deities, practicing magic, thinking rocks help with everything, thinking cards can tell the future, dressing up in fancy robes and mispronouncing Latin.

“Society will think less of us”, we’re already there.

7

#28DaysofBlackCosplay Spotlight 

In honor of #28DaysofBlackCosplay, check out a handful of the many fantastic black cosplayers from our Tomb Raider community!

Created in 2015 by cosplayer Chaka Cumberbatch-Tinsley as a “celebration of unity and pride”, #28DaysofBlackCosplay has become an international geek-culture movement. Learn more via her recent Buzzfeed interview. 

We can’t wait to see how the annual event continues to grow!


Photo Credits, In order of appearance:

Biology

  • Biology
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  • Flora and Fauna
  • Genetics
  • Inventing Species
  • List of Legendary Creatures
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  • People

Constructed Language (Conlang)

  • Basics/Phonology (2) (3)
  • Conlang
  • Conlang Guide
  • Conlang vs. English
  • Creating a Language (Revised)
  • Culture + Language
  • Curse Words
  • How to Create Your Own Language
  • How to Create a Language
  • IPA Pronunciation
  • Making Up Words

Culture Guides

  • 7 Deadly Sins
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  • Alternative Medieval
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  • Avoiding Utopia
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Keep reading

So I wanted to outline some of the new topics outlined in the new California history-social sciences curriculum to include and celebrate LGBTQ+ history. Because it’s something I’ve been doing a lot of research into and I just think it’s absolutely fantastic. The following is copied from the “Making the Framework Fair” document - a report from the Committee on LGBT History. It’s a comprehensive list of the topics proposed.

> Grade 2: 

• LGBT families in the context of understanding family diversity as a contemporary and historical reality 

>Grade 4: 

• Central roles played by gender and sexuality in California’s history as a site of rich, contested, and changing diversity 

- How settlers and missionaries sought to impose European American concepts of gender and sexuality on Native American societies 

- Possibilities and motivations for same-sex intimacies and gender diversity in frontier conditions and the Gold Rush era 

- The role of gender and sexuality in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century migrant belonging and policing 

- The crucial place of California and Californians in the development of the modern LGBT rights movement 

>Grade 5: 

• Variation over time, region, and culture in colonial American practices and laws with regard to gender and sexuality 

- Native American gender and sexual diversity and European responses in the context of North American colonialism 

- Regional diversity in family and community arrangements, gender roles and possibilities, and approaches to sexuality in law and practice, with attention to Puritans, Quakers, Southern settlers, and enslaved Africans 

>Grade 8: 

• Fundamental transformations in gender and sexuality in conjunction with nineteenth-century urbanization and industrialization 

- Same-sex romantic friendship as an accepted cultural practice resulting from the separate spheres ideology and shifting gender expectations for women and men 

- Roles of gender and sexuality in the practice and struggles over slavery and emancipation 

- Interlocking ways that gender, sexuality, and race shaped Western expansionism and the diverse possibilities it presented 

- Evolving social and cultural expressions of intimacy between men and women (including same-sex relations) through urbanization and immigration

>Grade 11: 

• The evolution of modern LGBT communities and identities 

- Relationships formed in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century female worlds of settlement houses, women’s colleges, and social movements

- Sexual and gender diversity in early twentieth-century cities and cultural movements, including the Harlem Renaissance 

- The impact on approaches to same-sex sexuality, gender diversity, and cultural expression of 1920s changes in sexual and gender norms, including Prohibition, the rise of dating, and the emphasis on companionate marriage

- New possibilities in World War II for same-sex intimacy, community, and identity on the homefront and abroad 

- The postwar creation of vibrant if persecuted LGBT subcultures 

- The formation of open and expressive LGBT cultures and communities since the 1970s 

- Contemporary diversity of LGBT people, families, and relationships 

• Twentieth-century persecution of sexual and gender minorities and the related growth of the LGBT civil rights movement 

- The medicalization of homosexuality and gender diversity as pathological and the subsequent struggle against this perspective

 - Systematic World War II attempts to eliminate gay men and lesbians from the military and the establishment of a regime of dishonorable discharge that denied many veterans their rights to benefits 

- The Lavender Scare targeting gay men and lesbians, which developed in conjunction with the postwar Red Scare and exceeded its impact in both time and scope 

- Homophile, gay liberation, and contemporary LGBT movements as part of the story of civil rights activism in the United States 

- Anti-gay activism as part of the rise of the New Right 

- AIDS as a medical, political, and social issue in U.S. history 

- Court cases about same-sex sexuality and gender diversity demonstrating changes in policies and public opinion over time


This is super exciting news for parents and teachers in California. Hopefully the rest of the U.S. follows suit quickly. It’s also important to note that teachers aren’t really being forced to teach these subjects, nor are they yet included in textbooks, worksheets, or other teaching tools very widely. Teachers are receiving trainings, but it will take years to disseminate this throughout the state. 

4

Keith Haring and William S. Burroughs photographed by Kate Simon, 1987.

In September of 1987 a group of visionary poets, artists, and performers representative of the cultural and literary movement known as the Beat Generation gathered in Lawrence, Kansas for a week-long literary festival of readings and diverse activities.

4

I was going through my photo’s from nyc and found these from the Museum of Art and Design. They had a section on the counter-culture movement in the 70′s that involved a lot of handmade, sustainable and reused fashion. 

Some of it was really gorgeous! But some looks like the fashion equivalent of an LSD trip. 

(sorry for the dark photos - idk what it is about nyc but all the museums were really dark) 

lmao this is why I hated most of the Asian/Asian-Americans who were into hip hop in undergrad – they were always snobs who usually didn’t like having Actual Black People™ around or rap by Actual Black People™ (I stg, they always liked Immortal Technique, I shit you not), there was always this feeling of them just lifting what they wanted from hip hop and taking it among themselves. the few Black kids who hung with them rarely had other Black friends. it was often hip hop out of context.

and I was pissed because the Black community was usually very careful to not disrespect other cultures and did our best to improve when called out from the outside, but once again, /we/ were free for consumption. THAT’S what always pisses me off. Black bodies, Black music, Black ideas, Black speech, Black style, Black movement, Black culture is always seen as consumable. we’re a product, a commodity. and when we complain, they see it as the cow being upset that you took its milk to make ice cream. I’m tired of us being a fucking crop, a source of cultural intellect production that’s used at the will of anyone else because our validity isn’t seen as innate.

Jung’s Ne, Abridged

These articles are an attempt to condense Chapter X of Psychological Types into a more readable format. I’ve tried to stay as true to the original texts as possible. Enjoy!

Foreword

Extroverted Intuition

Extroverted Intuition is directed towards things in the outer world. Intuitions are the result of subconscious processes, which appear in conscious awareness as a sense of expectancy, a vision, or an idea about the outer world that isn’t obvious from the visible facts. When Ne is dominant, it (like Se) doesn’t only perceive the world, but participates in it and creatively shapes it. Since Ne does this in part unconsciously, it also affects its peers through their unconscious.

Ne shows its user perceptions about things, and relationships between things, in a way that the other functions might only do in a roundabout way at best. They represent insights and future possibilities, and these hunches – while uncertain in their origin – have a decisive influence on the user’s behaviour. As an auxiliary function, Ne is what looks for a way out of a hopeless situation when every other function is stumped. When it is the dominant function, everything in life is like a locked room that must be opened. Objects and facts have an exaggerated value if they seem to offer a solution, a way out, but as soon as they fulfil their promise of novelty, they are dropped and forgotten.

The Ne type chases possibilities for their own sake, since (unlike Se) possibilities (and not sensations) represent the fullness of life. Some sensuous experiences might still be extremely compelling, but only if they hold the potential for new avenues of possibility. In general, the Ne type represses the other functions, especially Sensation, since it represents the “surface” of things that Ne is trying to peer behind.

The Extroverted Intuitive Type

This type is drawn to anything new and in-the-making he can sniff out in the external world. He differs from the Se type in his maladaptedness to material reality. What he perceives actually has little or no objective existence, since his focus is on potential instead of matter. He enters new situations with great energy and enthusiasm, as if they represented his entire future, only to coldly abandon them as soon as he becomes aware of their limits. The judging functions, with which he might convince himself to stay in one place, are relatively unconscious. His consideration for the well-being, convictions, and morals of others is forgotten to an equal extent – he might even accidentally harm others in his ravenous naivety.

If well-intentioned, this type is extremely useful to a society, since he can make use of his natural enthusiasm for budding possibilities by promoting business ventures or cultural movements. If he has a differentiated Feeling function, his ability to inspire and kindle enthusiasm in people is unrivalled, since his Intuition speaks to them through their unconscious. The stronger his Intuition, the more he embodies it, presenting his visions of the future convincingly and with a dramatic flair.

The Ne type risks forgetting his subjective needs, as he chases every possibility and spreads his vision without ever stopping to collect the fruits of his labour. He leaves his projects unfinished, or for others to work on and benefit from. If this happens, his inner life goes to his inferior functions in the unconscious. Instead of the magical and absurd qualities of the Se type’s neurosis, this type suffers from destructive quasi-realities. His repressed Sensation releases all kinds of compulsive anxieties concerning finances, health, sexual matters, etc.. He’s plagued by hypochondrial ideas, phobias, and absurd bodily sensations.

4

HIP-HOP the four elements

Dj / Mc’s / Graffiti / Break Dance

“A lot of times, when people say Hip-Hop, they don’t know what they’re talking about. They just think of the rappers. When you talk about hip-hop, you’re talking about the whole culture and movement. You have to take the whole culture for what it is.” Afrika Bambaataa

tbh I’ve always hated the “hoe culture/sex "positivity”“ movement online because it perpetuates such harmful ideologies. screaming at girls, especially young girls that just having sex all the time is great without talking about the emotional trauma that can cause or other harmful effects/risks of it isn’t a positivity movement. it’s reckless.

2

I have no shame 

Digger and the Gents are a N*Sync Style boy band with a little bit of classic rock flare here and there. Popular amongst teenagers of all genders, everyone has their Favorite - Digger, the head of the band (middle) is a Total Sweetheart; Eddie, however, is a heartbreaker (far left); Kent (far right) is a shy and quiet soul; Andy (second from the right) is a Trans Man icon; and finally Xander (second from the left) is a Wild Card, a Mystery waiting to be Cracked.  Their latest album, Here Comes the Stomp, is a Feel-Good mix of dance tunes and love ballads that would make anyone swoon. 

Captive Harpy is a Solo Indie Rock artist whose scratchy, soulful voice and Deep Themes have made her popular among various counter-cultural movements. Her previous album, Finding Myself, in which she came out as Bisexual, also made her an idol for the Sapphic community, her song “Let’s care for An Abandoned Chick Together” causing excitement far and wide for lesbian, bisexual, and other sapphic women. Her latest album, My Inner Dinosaur, is said to go deeper into her path of self-discovery and even may touch on some darker themes such as the end-Cretaceous Extinction. Early reviewers have said that if you do not cry while listening to this latest album, you literally do not have feelings. 

African American culture exists.

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve seen people being very demeaning or hostile toward African Americans, in regards to what culture we have or who we are as a people, and I’m sick of it. I’m sick of people acting like we as African Americans are nothing but “slaves”, I’m sick of people acting like we’re “inferior to real Africans”, I’m sick of white people telling us we have no culture while trying to take effort for what we’ve made for ourselves. I’m sick of negativity toward African Americans by both the black community, and white society.

So I just want to make a point that we as African Americans have our own culture that no one else on this world has.

It’s a culture of hardships, struggle yet at the same time triumph. It’s the culture of forging traditions and customs from ourselves from what we have lost, and making that into something bigger than ourselves.

Our culture is music, hip hop, R&B, rap, blues, soul, rock (yes rock), gospel, etc…etc… Our culture is dance, praise dance, hip hop dance, street dance, etc…etc.. Our culture is the religion/faith we’ve made that got us this far, it’s the food we eat that is only unique to us!  It’s even the lingo/slang we use. It’s the way we dress, wear our hair because that in itself is a political statement and a testament to our culture. The natural hair movement started in the African American community, that is ours.

All that I’ve listed above and MORE is ours, and if someone tries to tell you that you don’t have a culture, then don’t fret because you do. they’re just to ignorant to see it or understand it.

If someone tries to tell you that you don’t belong in their culture, then don’t be upset, because you have your own culture that shows just not how strong you are as a race, but as a person.

Don’t be ashamed of being African American. Don’t be ashamed of not finding your roots, because you have your roots, you know your roots and culture. It is the culture we as a people have made for ourselves that shows our true testament of survival and no one can take that away from us, no one can claim that, no one can claim that we don’t have it because we do.

That is our culture, as African American people…don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

And this isn’t an attack on anyone, but it’s a way to uplift African American people, especially African American women because we are always trying to connect back to our roots. I just want all of us to know that we, as a race do have a culture and we should be proud by how we’ve constructed it! It isn’t slavery either, it’s what we’ve crafted from then to now.

anonymous asked:

I've seen a few terms on this site (ableist, terf, and swerf) almost everywhere, and I was hoping if you could explain what it means. Thanks!

Hi anon! I’m technically taking a break from this blog, but I actually really wanted to answer this question in particular because it’s really important. I hope you don’t mind!

Content note: violence, transphobia, whorephobia, sex shaming, use of slurs, rape mention, death mention, murder mention, genitalia mention, pedophilia mention

1. Ableist

Ableism is hate, oppression, harassment, disdain, disrespect, erasure, etc related to disabled people. It can go from openly hating and mocking disabled people, to normalized ableism in the language (the use of ableist slurs like “dm*b”, “l*me”, “st*pid”, etc). It can also be not taking disabled people into account when stating things (for example “just go and walk every day to be healthier!” when a lot of people CAN’T walk). 

To quote Urban Dictionary:

Ableism is the discrimination or prejudice against people who have disabilities. Ableism can take the form of ideas and assumptions, stereotypes, attitudes and practices, physical barriers in the environment, or larger scale oppression. It is oftentimes unintentional and most people are completely unaware of the impact of their words or actions.

The thought that people with disabilities are dependent and require the care and support of someone else is an example of ableism. Sometimes this comes out in the form of people helping people with disabilities without asking them if they need assistance (and of course waiting the affirmative response).

Another example would be in designing spaces, places, events, information, communication, and technology without considering the variety of needs of people with disabilities. For example, a building that is built to code can still be technically inaccessible if the ramp is around the back of the building or if there is no automatic door opener installed.


Another quote from Urban Dictionary explains it this way:

Ableism is a form of discrimination toward people with disabilities either physical or mental. Generally, ableism prevents disabled persons from having the same access to rights and services that average people have no problems obtaining.


Wikipedia explains it this way:

In ableist societies, able-bodiedness is viewed as the norm; people with disabilities are understood as those that deviate from that norm. Disability is seen as something to overcome or to fix, for example, through medical intervention. The ableist worldview holds that disability is an error or a failing rather than a consequence of human diversity, akin to race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender. One common type of ableist behavior denies others’ autonomy by speaking for or about them rather than allowing them to speak for themselves. An example of this behavior occurs when a waiter speaks to an aid or a companion instead of directly to the person with a disability.

Other definitions of ableism include those of Chouinard, who defines it as “ideas, practices, institutions, and social relations that presume able-bodiedness, and by so doing, construct persons with disabilities as marginalized […] and largely invisible ‘others,’” and of Amundson and Taira, who define ableism as “a doctrine that falsely treats impairments as inherently and naturally horrible and blames the impairments themselves for the problems experienced by the people who have them.”


Ableism is also related to mental disabilities and mental illnesses as well. Discrimination against someone for things like having a low IQ, being “cr*zy,” not processing information or emotions in a way deemed “normal,” and other similar acts are all ableism. Other words for this specific form of ableism include “mentalism” and “sanism,” although I personally dislike those terms.


Wikipedia explains:

Mentalism or sanism is a form of discrimination and oppression because of a mental trait or condition a person has, or is judged to have. This may or may not be described in terms of mental disorder or disability. The discrimination is based on numerous factors such as: stereotypes about neurodivergence (e.g. autism, ADHD, bipolar, schizophrenia, personality disorder diagnoses), specific behavioral phenomena (e.g. stuttering, tics), or supposed intelligence.

Like other “isms” such as sexism and racism, mentalism involves multiple intersecting oppressions and complex social inequalities and imbalances of power. It can result in covert discrimination by multiple, small insults and indignities. It is characterized by judgments of another person’s perceived mental health status. These judgments are followed by actions such as blatant, overt discrimination (refusal of service, denying of human rights). Mentalism impacts how individuals are treated by the general public, by mental health professionals, and by institutions, including the legal system. The negative attitudes may also be internalized.

The terms mentalism (from mental) and sanism (from sane) have some widespread use, though concepts such as social stigma, and in some cases ableism, may be used in similar but not identical ways.

While mentalism and sanism are used interchangeably, sanism is becoming predominant in certain circles, such as academics, those who identify as mad and mad advocates and in a socio-political context where sanism is gaining ground as a movement. The movement of sanism is an act of resistance among those who identify as mad, consumer survivors, and mental health advocates. In academia evidence of this movement can be found in the number of recent publications about sanism and social work practice.


When someone says something is “ableist,” they are saying it contributes to ableism (or mentalism/sanism, if you choose to use such terms). In other words, they are saying it is discriminatory to people with mental illness, mental disability, or physical disability. 


2. TERF or TWERF

I’m sure you already know to some extent what feminism is, but just in case, let me share with you a quote:

Feminism comprises a number of egalitarian social, cultural and political movements, theories and moral philosophies concerned with gender inequalities and equal rights for women. It is the doctrine advocating social, political and all other rights for women which are equal to those of men.

Feminist political activists have been concerned with issues such as a woman’s right of contract and property; a woman’s right to bodily integrity and autonomy (e.g. on matters such as reproductive rights, abortion rights, access to contraception and quality prenatal care); women’s rights to protection from domestic violence, sexual harassment and rape; women’s workplace rights (e.g. maternity leave, equal pay, glass ceiling practices, etc); and opposition to all other forms of discrimination.

Feminist Theory is an extension of Feminism into theoretical or philosophical fields, such as anthropology, sociology, economics, women’s studies, literary criticism, art history, psychoanalysis and philosophy. It aims to understand gender inequality and focuses on gender politics, power relations and sexuality, as well as the promotion of women’s rights and interests.


Wikipedia explains feminism this way:

Feminism is a range of political movements, ideologies, and social movements that share a common goal: to define, establish, and achieve political, economic, personal, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal opportunities for women in education and employment.

Feminist movements have campaigned and continue to campaign for women’s rights, including the right to vote, to hold public office, to work, to earn fair wages or equal pay, to own property, to receive education, to enter contracts, to have equal rights within marriage, and to have maternity leave. Feminists have also worked to promote bodily autonomy and integrity, and to protect women and girls from rape, sexual harassment, and domestic violence.

Feminist campaigns are generally considered to be a main force behind major historical societal changes for women’s rights, particularly in the West, where they are near-universally credited with achieving women’s suffrage, gender neutrality in English, reproductive rights for women (including access to contraceptives and abortion), and the right to enter into contracts and own property. Although feminist advocacy is, and has been, mainly focused on women’s rights, some feminists, including bell hooks, argue for the inclusion of men’s liberation within its aims because men are also harmed by traditional gender rolesFeminist theory, which emerged from feminist movements, aims to understand the nature of gender inequality by examining women’s social roles and lived experience; it has developed theories in a variety of disciplines in order to respond to issues concerning gender.

Numerous feminist movements and ideologies have developed over the years and represent different viewpoints and aims. Some forms of feminism have been criticized for taking into account only white, middle class, and educated perspectives. This criticism led to the creation of ethnically specific or multicultural forms of feminism, including black feminism and intersectional feminism.


When you see someone being called a TERF, it is a warning to others that this is a feminist who is dangerous, bigoted, and hateful towards transgender individuals. Calling someone a TERF means you are calling them a feminist who is transphobic and promoting hateful, antitrans ideologies.


To quote Geek Feminism:

TERF is an acronym for Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist. Sometimes, “exclusionary” is expanded as “eliminationist” or “exterminationist” instead to more accurately convey the degree to which TERFs advocate for harm towards trans people, specifically trans people who were coercively assigned male at birth.

Some TERFs call themselves “gender-critical feminists”, a term which is synonymous with “TERF”.

Their position (which is not shared by this wiki) denies that trans people’s self-affirmed genders and sexes are equally valid as cis people’s self-affirmed genders and sexes. It has a decades-long history of allying with anti-feminist causes in denying trans people access to health care, and other human rights.

Unsurprisingly, many TERFs complain that “TERF” should be regarded as a slur.

According to Tracey at The TERFs (an anti-TERF site) and Cristan Williams at The Transadvocate, the term TERF was first used in writing by Viv Smythe/tigtog of Hoyden About Town in August 2008. tigtog said in the interview with Cristan Williams that she believes that she and Lauredhel coined it some time prior as a chat shorthand.


In some contexts, you might also hear “TWERF” used instead to convey that the person isn’t against all trans people, but rather just transgender women (women who were assigned male at birth). 


In case you didn’t know what radical feminism is, this is how Wikipedia explains it:

Radical feminism is a perspective within feminism that calls for a radical reordering of society in which male supremacy is eliminated in all social and economic contexts.

Radical feminists seek to abolish patriarchy by challenging existing social norms and institutions, rather than through a purely political process. This includes challenging the notion of traditional gender roles, opposing the sexual objectification of women, and raising public awareness about such issues as rape and violence against women.

Early radical feminism, arising within second-wave feminism in the 1960s, typically viewed patriarchy as a “transhistorical phenomenon" prior to or deeper than other sources of oppression, “not only the oldest and most universal form of domination but the primary form" and the model for all others. Later politics derived from radical feminism ranged from cultural feminism to more syncretic politics that placed issues of class, economics, etc. on a par with patriarchy as sources of oppression.

Radical feminists locate the root cause of women’s oppression in patriarchal gender relations, as opposed to legal systems (as in liberal feminism) or class conflict (as in anarchist feminism, socialist feminism, and Marxist feminism).


In other words, radical feminism doesn’t relate to being “extremist,” as the word radical implies, but rather to eliminating the root of misogyny and the oppression of women.


Many radical feminists are TERFS, but not all are. I was always told that radical feminists coined the word TERF to separate them from the movement, because transgender exclusion was, in their minds, not part of their movement. I can’t verify this for sure.


Many people do not seem to know this, but there are many branches of feminism. Radical feminism is one of hundreds of schools of thought within feminism. 

Philosophy Basics explains:

Radical Feminism considers the capitalist hierarchy of society, which it describes as sexist and male-based, as the defining feature of women’s oppression. Most Radical Feminists see no alternatives other than the total uprooting and reconstruction of society in order to overthrow patriarchy and achieve their goals.

Separatist Feminism is a form of Radical Feminism, which argues that the sexual disparities between men and women are unresolvable, that men cannot make positive contributions to the feminist movement, and that even well-intentioned men replicate patriarchal dynamics.

Sex-Positive Feminism is a response to anti-pornography feminists who argue that heterosexual pornography is a central cause of women’s oppression, and that sexual freedom (which may or may not involve a woman’s ight to participate in heterosexual pornography) is an essential component of women’s freedom.

Anarcha-Feminism (or Anarchist Feminism) is another offshoot of Radical Feminism and combines Feminist and Anarchist beliefs in which patriarchy is viewed as a manifestation of hierarchy so that the fight against patriarchy is an essential part of the class struggle and the Anarchist struggle against the state.

Black Feminism (or Womanism) argues that sexism, class oppression and racism are inextricably bound together. Alice Walker and other Womanists claim that black women experience a different and more intense kind of oppression from that of white women.

Socialist Feminism (or Marxist Feminism) connects the oppression of women to Marxist ideas about exploitation, oppression and labour. Socialist Feminists see the need to work alongside men and all other groups, and to focus their energies on broad change that affects society as a whole, and not just on an individual basis.

Liberal Feminism (or Individualist Feminism) seeks the equality of men and women through political and legal reform. Liberal Feminists see the personal individual interactions between men and women as the place from which to transform society and argue that no major change to the structure of society is needed.

French Feminism (or Post-Structural Feminism) tends to be more philosophical and more literary, than the more pragmatic Anglophone Feminism. It is less concerned with immediate political doctrine and generally focuses on theories of “the body”. The 1949 treatise “The Second Sex” by the French author and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986) is a foundational tract of contemporary Feminism, in which she sets out a feminist Existentialism which prescribes a moral revolution and focuses on the concept of Woman as the quintessential Other, which de Beauvoir identifies as fundamental to women’s oppression.

Eco-Feminism links Feminism with ecology, arguing that the domination of women stems from the same patriarchal ideologies that bring about the domination and destruction of the environment.

Christian Feminism is a branch of feminist theology which seeks to interpret and understand Christianity in light of the equality of women and men, which has been largely ignored historically.

Pro-Feminism refers to support of Feminism without implying that the supporter is a member of the feminist movement. It is usually used in reference to men who are actively supportive of Feminism and of efforts to bring about gender equality.


And this is not, by any means, a complete list. There are many other branches of feminist theory and feminist thought, and many different ways that people can engage in feminist activism.


But TERFS often only acknowledge radical feminism (which they consider the only real feminism) and liberal feminism.


Transgender Advocate explains the warning signs that you as an individual might be a TERF:

I’ve noticed that there seems to be some confusion about what a TERF* is so, here’s a quick guide to help you figure out if you’re a TERF. Chances are that you’re a TERF if you believe that you’re a feminist when you…

1.) Claim that trans women are cis men, that trans men are cis women and purposefully misgender trans people.

2.) Out trans people to employers.

3.) Tell trans women their surgery is about supporting rape culture.

4.) Assert that lesbian-identified trans women can’t be lesbian.

5.) Claim that a world without trans people is preferable.

6.) Find that your anti-trans arguments and the anti-trans arguments of far right-wing groups match.

7.) Assert cis privilege isn’t real; that non-trans people aren’t privileged in a society that’s hostile to trans people.

8.) Claim that gender isn’t real, but the MAAB/FAAB binary is.

9.) Claim that trans surgeries were pioneered by men in service of the patriarchy.

10.) Lie about rape and death threats you’ve received from trans people.

11.) Fearmonger about the rape/violence threat trans women pose to cis women in the women’s restroom.

12.) Assert that trans people transition to satisfy their sexual urges.

13.) Degrade and dehumanize the genitals of trans people.

14.) Work to overturn trans equality protections.

15.) Work to halt access to trans medical care.

16.) Appeal to the Klan Fallacy.

17.) Compare transition to a disgusting Frankenstein-like process.

18.) Claim that trans people transition due to political or social pressures.

19.) Claim that when you work to halt the propagation of anti-feminist stereotypes it’s empowerment, but when trans people work to halt the propagation of anti-trans stereotypes it’s censorship .

20.) Assert that trans women transition because they’re actually gay men and that trans men transition because they’re lesbians wanting to escape the patriarchy.

21.) Threaten actual radical feminist organizations with killing its trans members, and then show up at the radfem event armed with guns.

22.) Beat actual radical feminists for protecting trans women from a TERF bashing.

23.) Mob Lesbian Avengers who have a trans kid with them and then threaten the kid with a knife.

24.) Menace a butch Lesbian radical feminist so much that the radfem decides to start their own inclusive Women’s Music Festival.

25.) Threaten a group of trans women with bodily violence so that they have to start something called Camp Trans in protest.

26.) Promote so-called “bathroom bills” because you think it’s “pro-Lesbian.”

27.) Find that Tea Party Republicans start promoting your TERF rhetoric.

28.) Promote right-wing propaganda mill nonsense to substantiate your hate because they’re the only ones who, in your estimation, are your ideological allies.

29.) Find that right-wing pundits and even hate groups like the Westboro Baptist Church defend TERF hate.

30.) Appeal to vaginal odors as being a sexed essence which demarcates an authentic sexed status, so that trans women aren’t actual women because the vaginas of trans women are so smelly that it causes “serious smell issues” while, simultaneously being so non-smelly that a trans woman can never know (as actual women apparently do) what it’s like to have a “big, hairy, smelly vagina.”

Bonus: Pretend that the term “TERF” –popularized, in 2008 by a radical feminist-inclusive feminist community as a way of distinguishing between radical feminists from anti-trans bigots who label themselves “radical feminists”– was actually created by the trans  community in order to slur feminism.


I highly recommend these sources if you would like to know more:

Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminism: What Exactly Is It, And Why Does It Hurt?

The Terfs

Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminism on Rational Wiki


Of these sources, The Terfs will be the most helpful, but it contains a lot of violence and disturbing language. Please stay safe!


3. SWERF

SWERFS are another subgroup of radical feminists, very similar to TERFS. Often, someone who is a TERF will also be a SWERF, but this is not always the case.


Urban Dictionary defines SWERF this way:

Acronym for "Sex Worker Exclusionary Radical Feminist”. A person who espouses to be a feminist but who does not believe that women engaged in ANY form of voluntary sex work should be included in the fight for equality, especially in employment or salary parity. This rabid exclusion of an entire class of women is usually a belief based on misplaced uptight morality.


Rational Wiki explains further:

Sex worker exclusionary radical feminism (also known as SWERF) is yet another offshoot of feminism, one that opposes women’s participation in pornography and prostitution. The term was coined to match that of TERF, as their memberships overlap. Their ideology also overlaps as both subgroups follow a prescriptive, normative approach to feminism; i.e., telling women what to do — TERFs with their gender, and SWERFs with their sexuality.

SWERFs criticize the objectification and exploitation of women within pornography and the sex industry, as well as the violence and abuse that sex workers frequently suffer.

SWERFs typically go completely overboard and dump on sex-workers who chose their profession freely, even in places where it is completely legal and safe, claiming that the sex workers are nothing more than deluded victims (and co-perpetrators) of human trafficking. Much like white supremacists might insist that adoption agencies helping children from the third world find parents in the west are nothing more than deluded extinctionists. This dogmatic hostility to voluntary sex work is known as whorephobia.


Many SWERFS argue that they do not like when men control women’s sexuality. But these same people do exactly the same thing. They attack women for being involved in sex work and/or BDSM/kink, or liking porn. Sometimes they will also police women for what they wear or for having makeup, and will also criticize people for playing dressup with their daughters because the believe this is “sexualizing children” and contributing to “pedophilia culture.”


SJW Wiki uses this quote from Tumblr to explain:

“The mere fact that SWERFs are not actively antagonizing workers in the garment industry, or the domestic labor industry, or the farming and food production industry, or even going after MALE sex workers to the degree that they speak over and attack female sex workers shows that their their actions aren’t about ending incidents of abuse, discrimination and sexual misconduct in the workforce, but about controlling women’s bodies, specifically women’s sexual agency .”

Musings of a Naked Lady, on Tumblr


Interestingly, when I Google “TERF,” many articles about how awful and hateful TERFS are show up. But when I Google “SWERF,” most of the articles that appear are defending TERFS and SWERFS and arguing that these terms are an attack on women and radical feminism.


I think the moral of the story there is that more people are uncomfortable with transphobia than they are whorephobia, which is sad because many many people see nothing wrong with transphobia.


I hope you found this helpful, anon! Let us know if you have more questions!


💖 Mod Bella 💖

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