cultural-movement

When to Cast a Spell - By Time of Day

my personal correspondences by time of day, complied form my grimoire.

dawn - breaking curses, beauty and glamour spells. weather and sea spells. magic involving delicate feelings, friendship and forgiveness, budding romance.

morning - fertility, good luck, green/herbal witchcraft. best time to brew potions. intuition and justice. 

noon - wealth and career spells. success and motivation. confidence and courage spells. kitchen magic.

afternoon - the time to gather herbs. communication spells. travel protections. 

evening - psychic protections, peace/balance spells. kitchen spells and pop culture spells

twilight - catalysts, movement and growth. astral travel and divination. love/lust spells. technology witchcraft.

evening -  curses, hexes, banishment, bindings. space and cosmic magic. dream magic. hedgecraft

midnight - creativity, switching between realms. spirit work, liminal spaces, reaching through the veil.

Biology

  • Biology
  • Creating a Race (2)
  • Creating Animals (2)
  • Disease (2)
  • Ecosystems (2)
  • Evolution (and Space)
  • Flora and Fauna
  • Genetics
  • Inventing Species
  • List of Legendary Creatures
  • Night Vision/Color Vision
  • People

Constructed Language (Conlang)

  • Basics/Phonology (2) (3)
  • Conlang
  • Conlang Guide
  • Conlang vs. English
  • Creating a Language (Revised)
  • Culture + Language
  • Curse Words
  • How to Create Your Own Language
  • How to Create a Language
  • IPA Pronunciation
  • Making Up Words

Culture Guides

  • 7 Deadly Sins
  • Alien Cultures (2)
  • Alternative Medieval
  • Avoiding Cultural Appropriation
  • Avoiding Medieval Fantasy (2)
  • Avoiding One-Note Worlds
  • Avoiding Utopia
  • Change (2)
  • Class/Caste System (2)
  • Culture
  • Designing Intellectual Movements
  • Everything (2) (3)
  • Fantasy
  • Gender-Equal Societies
  • Historical Background for Ideas (2)
  • History
  • Matriarchy (2)
  • Nationalism
  • Nations
  • Slavery
  • Static World
  • Structure
  • Wandering Peoples

Economy

  • Basic Economics
  • Capitalism
  • Currency (2) (3)
  • Current Global Economies
  • Economic Systems
  • Economics (1500-1800 AD)
  • Economics and Government
  • Economics for Dummies
  • Economy
  • Inflation
  • International Trade (2)
  • Marxist Communism
  • Medieval Economics
  • Schools of Economic Thought
  • Socialism (2)
  • Types of Economic Systems
  • World Economy (2)

Everyday Life

  • Art
  • Ceremonies
  • Clothing
  • Clothing Terminology (2) (3) (4)
  • Clothing Reference
  • Demographics
  • Disease
  • Drugs
  • Education (2)
  • Fame and Infamy
  • Family
  • Food (2)
  • Food Timeline
  • Immigration/Emigration
  • Literature
  • Marriage
  • Months
  • Music
  • Sex
  • Slang
  • Stories
  • Travel

Government

  • Collective/Traditionalist Societies
  • Creating a Government
  • Diplomacy
  • Empire (2)
  • Fancy Latin Names for Government
  • History and Politics
  • International Relations (2)
  • Justice System
  • Lawlessness
  • Non-monarchical (2) (3)
  • Oppressive Government
  • Political Ideologies
  • Propaganda
  • Republic
  • Rise and Fall of Civilizations
  • Secret Societies
  • Shapeshifter Society
  • Totalitarianism, Atmosphere Necessary For
  • Tribal Society
  • Types of Government
  • Utopia
  • Writing Politics

Keep reading

We were deluded, they said; we were foolish, absurd. Sometimes it was more brittle, more hostile, more derogatory. At meetings I attended, marches I participated in, dances my lover and I showed up to attend, I was asked why we had bothered to come or told we were not welcome: ‘No femmie women with he/she men.’

I was told I should find myself a 'real’ man if that’s what I was into. I often had to escort and then remain with my butch lovers so they could use the women’s bathroom at movement institutions. That was in 1973. In 1995, I and my stone butch lover of the time were refused entrance to a lesbian feminist women’s dance at the New York City Lesbian and Gay Community Center during Gay Pride Week. We were told the same things I’d been told twenty-five years before: It - butch/femme - was a dangerous heterosexist trap.

The hostility and ridicule we faced inside the lesbian movement paralleled and overlapped our lives in the broader straight world - where we were often treated as criminals. My first butch lover and I began to fear coming home after we found our cat murdered in front of our apartment, with a note pinned to the door saying we’d be next. We regularly fought with men who waited outside the bar for the most obvious bull daggers and their 'faggot girlfriends,’ or we turned away and hated ourselves for giving in.

Strolling together as a butch/femme couple, we were an erotic, magnetic, moving target for all the sexual fear, envy, and ignorance of this culture. Our movements and decisions were fraught with potential danger. Unexpected visits to the emergency room, how to rent a motel room, crossing a border, being busted at bars when the cops came for their weekly payoffs, getting an apartment. None of these acts were simple or could ever be taken for granted.

I have always had to laugh whenever I hear that femmes are not as tough, capable, or rugged as our butch lovers. We fought together, we carried ourselves with our heads high, we protected the women we loved when we could - and they tried to protect us - we held each other when we didn’t win, and we held each other when we did.

—  Amber L. Hollibaugh, My Dangerous Desires

Whoever is saying “Pop occulture means society won’t take us seriously” is missing the whole point of Paganism being a counter-cultural movement.

Seriously, society already thinks we’re nuts for worshiping many deities, practicing magic, thinking rocks help with everything, thinking cards can tell the future, dressing up in fancy robes and mispronouncing Latin.

“Society will think less of us”, we’re already there.

So I wanted to outline some of the new topics outlined in the new California history-social sciences curriculum to include and celebrate LGBTQ+ history. Because it’s something I’ve been doing a lot of research into and I just think it’s absolutely fantastic. The following is copied from the “Making the Framework Fair” document - a report from the Committee on LGBT History. It’s a comprehensive list of the topics proposed.

> Grade 2: 

• LGBT families in the context of understanding family diversity as a contemporary and historical reality 

>Grade 4: 

• Central roles played by gender and sexuality in California’s history as a site of rich, contested, and changing diversity 

- How settlers and missionaries sought to impose European American concepts of gender and sexuality on Native American societies 

- Possibilities and motivations for same-sex intimacies and gender diversity in frontier conditions and the Gold Rush era 

- The role of gender and sexuality in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century migrant belonging and policing 

- The crucial place of California and Californians in the development of the modern LGBT rights movement 

>Grade 5: 

• Variation over time, region, and culture in colonial American practices and laws with regard to gender and sexuality 

- Native American gender and sexual diversity and European responses in the context of North American colonialism 

- Regional diversity in family and community arrangements, gender roles and possibilities, and approaches to sexuality in law and practice, with attention to Puritans, Quakers, Southern settlers, and enslaved Africans 

>Grade 8: 

• Fundamental transformations in gender and sexuality in conjunction with nineteenth-century urbanization and industrialization 

- Same-sex romantic friendship as an accepted cultural practice resulting from the separate spheres ideology and shifting gender expectations for women and men 

- Roles of gender and sexuality in the practice and struggles over slavery and emancipation 

- Interlocking ways that gender, sexuality, and race shaped Western expansionism and the diverse possibilities it presented 

- Evolving social and cultural expressions of intimacy between men and women (including same-sex relations) through urbanization and immigration

>Grade 11: 

• The evolution of modern LGBT communities and identities 

- Relationships formed in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century female worlds of settlement houses, women’s colleges, and social movements

- Sexual and gender diversity in early twentieth-century cities and cultural movements, including the Harlem Renaissance 

- The impact on approaches to same-sex sexuality, gender diversity, and cultural expression of 1920s changes in sexual and gender norms, including Prohibition, the rise of dating, and the emphasis on companionate marriage

- New possibilities in World War II for same-sex intimacy, community, and identity on the homefront and abroad 

- The postwar creation of vibrant if persecuted LGBT subcultures 

- The formation of open and expressive LGBT cultures and communities since the 1970s 

- Contemporary diversity of LGBT people, families, and relationships 

• Twentieth-century persecution of sexual and gender minorities and the related growth of the LGBT civil rights movement 

- The medicalization of homosexuality and gender diversity as pathological and the subsequent struggle against this perspective

 - Systematic World War II attempts to eliminate gay men and lesbians from the military and the establishment of a regime of dishonorable discharge that denied many veterans their rights to benefits 

- The Lavender Scare targeting gay men and lesbians, which developed in conjunction with the postwar Red Scare and exceeded its impact in both time and scope 

- Homophile, gay liberation, and contemporary LGBT movements as part of the story of civil rights activism in the United States 

- Anti-gay activism as part of the rise of the New Right 

- AIDS as a medical, political, and social issue in U.S. history 

- Court cases about same-sex sexuality and gender diversity demonstrating changes in policies and public opinion over time


This is super exciting news for parents and teachers in California. Hopefully the rest of the U.S. follows suit quickly. It’s also important to note that teachers aren’t really being forced to teach these subjects, nor are they yet included in textbooks, worksheets, or other teaching tools very widely. Teachers are receiving trainings, but it will take years to disseminate this throughout the state. 

on one hand the get down was probably one of the most expensive shows netflix was producing, but on another hand the fact that its the only one not to get a second season is absolutely bullshit and I’m skeptical of it just being about directing conflict. It seems more likely that the real reason it’s getting scrapped is how undervalued its subject matter and story is. Like sense8 is EXTREMELY expensive AND had a director walk out half way through AND had to replace an actor and its probably gonna go on to get a season 3. But it stuck to every stereotype in the book about the poc represented and gay men (and even resurrected the “f*g hag” which is regressive as shit) and drowned its story in orgies so it gets play but not a legitimately well done, well told story about the influence of black/gay culture on artistic movements because. obviously.

it’s funny…anti-sjw/alt-right goobers say that they’re “anti-censorship” and compare “the ess jay dubayoos” to jack thompson and the ptc, but they’re the ones demanding that “cultural marxist propaganda” should be banned. they’re the ones who got offended at the “down with cis” meme. they’re the ones who demanded to ban a shakespeare play and the ones who boycotted star wars and wolfenstein.

they don’t realize that they’re not rebels, they’re not critical thinkers, they’re not a hip youth counter-cultural movement. they are the mainstream, just with a nastier tone of voice.

7

#28DaysofBlackCosplay Spotlight 

In honor of #28DaysofBlackCosplay, check out a handful of the many fantastic black cosplayers from our Tomb Raider community!

Created in 2015 by cosplayer Chaka Cumberbatch-Tinsley as a “celebration of unity and pride”, #28DaysofBlackCosplay has become an international geek-culture movement. Learn more via her recent Buzzfeed interview. 

We can’t wait to see how the annual event continues to grow!


Photo Credits, In order of appearance:

Art History Witchery: Surrealism

Hey, all! If you have any suggestions for what you would like to see the future let me know! This lesson is about Surrealism. Now a bit about the movement itself.



Surrealism began in the 1920s as an offshoot of Dada, an avant-garde art movement that embraced the absurd. Surrealism was more than a mere art movement, it was a cultural movement that the way to achieve completeness was to combine reality and the unconscious, thus creating a Surreality. They are best known for combining an environment that is almost photographic quality with otherworldly and disconcerting elements, such as the melting clocks in Salvador Dali’s Persistence of Memory (shown above). Surrealism was meant to make people uncomfortable and to think outside the box that reality tends to put people into.


Notable Surrealist Artists:

  • Salvador Dali
  • Andre Breton (founder)
  • Freida Kahlo
  • Lenora Carrington
  • Dorthea Tanning

For Surrealism, I’ve created a card spread that boils down the main idea of Surrealism, combining reality with the unconscious to create a surreality.


The Surrealist Card Spread:

Reality: What influences are around you 

Unconscious: What your inner self is telling you

Surreality: How to achieve and balance what both influences want

Please note that tarot, oracle cards, or runes are not a substitute for professional help.

African American culture exists.

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve seen people being very demeaning or hostile toward African Americans, in regards to what culture we have or who we are as a people, and I’m sick of it. I’m sick of people acting like we as African Americans are nothing but “slaves”, I’m sick of people acting like we’re “inferior to real Africans”, I’m sick of white people telling us we have no culture while trying to take effort for what we’ve made for ourselves. I’m sick of negativity toward African Americans by both the black community, and white society.

So I just want to make a point that we as African Americans have our own culture that no one else on this world has.

It’s a culture of hardships, struggle yet at the same time triumph. It’s the culture of forging traditions and customs from ourselves from what we have lost, and making that into something bigger than ourselves.

Our culture is music, hip hop, R&B, rap, blues, soul, rock (yes rock), gospel, etc…etc… Our culture is dance, praise dance, hip hop dance, street dance, etc…etc.. Our culture is the religion/faith we’ve made that got us this far, it’s the food we eat that is only unique to us!  It’s even the lingo/slang we use. It’s the way we dress, wear our hair because that in itself is a political statement and a testament to our culture. The natural hair movement started in the African American community, that is ours.

All that I’ve listed above and MORE is ours, and if someone tries to tell you that you don’t have a culture, then don’t fret because you do. they’re just to ignorant to see it or understand it.

If someone tries to tell you that you don’t belong in their culture, then don’t be upset, because you have your own culture that shows just not how strong you are as a race, but as a person.

Don’t be ashamed of being African American. Don’t be ashamed of not finding your roots, because you have your roots, you know your roots and culture. It is the culture we as a people have made for ourselves that shows our true testament of survival and no one can take that away from us, no one can claim that, no one can claim that we don’t have it because we do.

That is our culture, as African American people…don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

And this isn’t an attack on anyone, but it’s a way to uplift African American people, especially African American women because we are always trying to connect back to our roots. I just want all of us to know that we, as a race do have a culture and we should be proud by how we’ve constructed it! It isn’t slavery either, it’s what we’ve crafted from then to now.

5

Keith Haring, William S. Burroughs and John Giorno in Lawrence, Kansas, 1987.

In September of 1987 a group of visionary poets, artists, and performers representative of the cultural and literary movement known as the Beat Generation gathered in Lawrence, Kansas for a week-long literary festival of readings and diverse activities.

thewrap.com
BREAKING: Hugh Hefner, Playboy Founder, Dies at 91
"He defined a lifestyle and ethos that lie at the heart of the Playboy brand," son Cooper Hefner says

Matt Donnelly at The Wrap: 

Playboy founder and icon Hugh Hefner died on Wednesday evening at 91, a spokesperson for the men’s magazine said.

Hefner passed of natural causes at his home, the famed Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles, surrounded by loved ones. Burial details and memorial plans are presently unknown.

“My father lived an exceptional and impactful life as a media and cultural pioneer and a leading voice behind some of the most significant social and cultural movements of our time,” his son and current Playboy Chief Creative Officer Cooper Hefner said in a statement.

Swift’s 2015 stare-down of Apple—she declined to put her hit album 1989 on Apple’s nascent streaming-music service when the company said it would not pay artists during its initial launch; Apple changed its policy immediately and paid everyone—was a seismic example of a single artist’s toppling corporate might. At 26, Swift is world famous, wealthy, critically celebrated, a style influencer, and a cultural movement unto herself, recognizable everywhere she goes. She also has two awesome cats.
And yet today, in this chapel atop a hill in Reading, Pennsylvania, Swift is none of those things. (x)

4

I was going through my photo’s from nyc and found these from the Museum of Art and Design. They had a section on the counter-culture movement in the 70′s that involved a lot of handmade, sustainable and reused fashion. 

Some of it was really gorgeous! But some looks like the fashion equivalent of an LSD trip. 

(sorry for the dark photos - idk what it is about nyc but all the museums were really dark) 

I think it’s super cool to look at Disney villains as a microcosm of what people feared when the movies were made.

Like, Disney movies pay so much attention to cultural movements in creating their movies because they’re designed to pull people’s heartstrings, make people relate to them, and make sweet, sweet merchandising money– so they do reflect a lot of the dreams, desires, and yes, fears of their time.

For example, how evil guardians of children are represented. Cinderella came out during the 1950’s, which was right when postwar marketing emphasized the idealized nuclear family, with two parents, kids, roles clearly defined, household work being done by the mother, etc… Cinderella’s horrible mistreatment mainly comes from a stepmother who refuses to serve the mother role in a family that has no surviving father to act as the head of household. Cinderella’s happy ending marriage at the end is associated with the idea that being kind and working hard will pay off.

In the 90’s, we have Frollo keeping Quasimodo captive and abusing him as well as abusing his authority as a powerful judge in the community (and an outspoken religious figure). This was during a time when people really started worrying about more institutional abuse from powerful authority and religious figures– the ‘satanic panic’ when people worried about satanic rituals in preschools, sex abuse scandals in the church and from teachers, weird cult-related events making the news.

Tangled, which came out in 2010, is in many ways a very realistic portrait of what it’s like for a child to have a narcissistic parent and to suffer from the effects of lifelong psychological abuse, a concern that was much more prevalent and publicized. (It’s also a kidnapping story– people in the 2000’s were more concerned than ever about kidnapping, what with the 24-hour news, the use of the internet, Madeleine McCann’s disappearance in 2007, etc.) While Cinderella’s stepmother used Cinderella as a tool to do housework, Gothel pretty much literally fed on Rapunzel’s power to increase her own. Rapunzel’s marriage and happy ending is framed as a narrative of independence, finding her true self, and girl power, which is a narrative we see more of in the 2000’s.