cultural-fragmentation

nytimes.com
China Machado, Breakthrough Model Until the End, Dies at 86
Ms. Machado was the first nonwhite supermodel, and it’s a legacy the fashion industry has to wrestle with.
By Vanessa Friedman

“She was the first to put in front of the audience the idea of the otherness, bringing out memories of different cultures and fragments of other imagery. She always did it with irony, without posing, modeling or vogueing. Somehow she showed it all while dancing.”

There is something sick and sorry about a world that endorses the consumption of other human beings as if they were no more than just another material thing—that teaches us it is OK to cycle through romances like they were the chamber of a revolver in a game of Russian roulette.
—  Beau TaplinC o n s u m e r   H o o k u p   C u l t u r e  

The ceramic fragments in this display—part of a clay bowl, and pot handles shaped like human or animal faces—were likely made by a group sometimes called the Taino peoples, though that single name probably masks their true cultural diversity. Their society was based on farming, and people often lived in large villages with impressive public spaces. Learn more about ¡Cuba! 
©AMNH/D. Finnin

anonymous asked:

What is Palestinian culture like? I mean, how is it in general and how does it compare to neighboring cultures? Is it liberal or conservative and what directions is it headed in?

How does one describe a culture? Especially one as old as the Palestinian culture and in recent times has been under attack by a colonial settler state that seeks to erase it? A culture that is fragmented because of the diaspora? How can someone describe a culture as either “liberal” or “conservative”? Why should it be homogenous?

A culture is a culture. It is a product of its people and the times. There’s no way to describe it to you if you do not interact with it. *You* have to learn about it. No one else can do that for you.

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“Too many artists care what others think - we are for the ‘community’ - a non linear observation on everything that has been and what will become, the lack of understanding of the world we are immersed in. The post-ironic notion of the modern world. Selfie mythologizing. Creating how we consume. Fragments of culture. Not settling for what you’re given. WE’VE JUST COME TO REPRESENT A DECLINE IN THE STANDARDS OF WHAT WE ACCEPT.“  - Matthew Healy 

With Love Me we wanted to capture the neon-hued enthralling acquisition of success and excess, the screaming momentum, the sexy daze. Everything is REDICULOUS! But, is it? All I know is the only art worth any investment is the art that makes you feel personally addressed. A simple truth, or set of truths, that galvanises an awareness and passion within the individual and in doing so immerses them into a sense of community founded upon that same personal connection or experience. Too many artists care what others think - we are for the ‘community’ - a non linear observation on everything that has been and what will become, the lack of understanding of the world we are immersed in. The post-ironic notion of the modern world. Selfie mythologizing. Creating how we consume. Fragments of culture. Not settling for what you’re given. WE’VE JUST COME TO REPRESENT A DECLINE IN THE STANDARDS OF WHAT WE ACCEPT.
—  Matthew Healy about ‘Love Me’ video, October 28th 2015
[S]omehow in culture, “lowest common denominator” has become a way to describe not what’s unifying but what’s worst, as if we all come together where we are awful and stupid. In fact, when we do all come together in large numbers, it’s usually not where we are awful and stupid, particularly not because we are awful and stupid.
— 

This NPR story by Linda Holmes about coastal snobbery and “the masses” appeals to me not just because the vilification of roughly half the country by the other half is both A) a bad thing and B) a two-way street that each half pretends is one-sided, but because I always thought the best things about our culture were the things we mostly agreed upon.

I will probably end up just repeating what Linda Holmes said in her very smart piece if I type for too long, but to make it clear: The things in America that everyone likes are not Honey Boo Boo and Taylor Swift and whatever-else thing you think is destroying our culture. Those things are actually deeply contentious. Stuff that everybody likes? Prince. Star Wars. Pizza. “Call Me Maybe.” Lost, in its early seasons. Willie Nelson, if you live in Texas. Stuff that is good, in other words. 

The zeitgeist is usually about stuff that is pretty good, but not terribly idiosyncratic. It’s the height of arrogance to argue that things that very specifically appeal to our particular idiosyncrasies are actually the best stuff, and that people who don’t share them are foolish. You love those things more because they speak to a part of you that other people don’t seem to have. That’s the only real difference between what you love and what everybody loves.