cultural visibility

11 strange things about living in Germany.
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Moving to another country is exciting, but challenging. Cultural differences become more visible and you have to adapt to a different way of life. 

Here are the top things I found strange about life in Germany. 

1. Bureaucracy 

I thought Mexico was very bureaucratic, until I lived in Germany. Do you need to open a bank account in Germany? Are you a foreigner? you’ll need two weeks. First you need to ask for an appointment, then submit all the paperwork and wait until every single document, number and statement comes through the mail. Registering yourself at the local office? three days minimum. Germans know this and always complain about it. On the upside: Germans are very efficient and most things will be done right the first time.

2. Nothing is open on Sundays 

In Germany most restaurants, supermarkets and stores are closed on Sundays as most people use this day to relax or be with their family. Most Cafés are open though and there are lots of parks where you can take a walk.

3. Cash only 

The first two weeks I was in Germany I had lots of problems with my bank: I could pay with my card but I couldn’t withdraw cash from the ATM’s. This wouldn’t be a problem in most countries but German businesses rarely accept cards and when they do it is usually an EC Card issued by a German bank. Credit cards are not a big thing in Germany and most stores, bars and restaurants are “cash only”. 

4. People will tell you what to do 

Germans are very forward when giving advice and they will try to make you understand that the best way to do things is "the German way". When Germans are sick they drink ginger tea, so you must also drink ginger tea. Got a zit? rub some German ointment on it. For Germans their cars, beer, technology and everything Deutsch-made is the best (and it kind of is). I got told to “cover up” twice while walking from the gym to my house wearing shorts in the Winter so be ready to get free advice when in Germany. 


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5. Don’t jaywalk 

Germans are very anal about this. Most people will wait until it is their turn to cross the street. If you cross before the Ampelmann turns green, there is a possibility you will be yelled at. It is vital for Germans to set a good example for children so people disregarding order deserves a good dose of public scolding. Just be civil and wait until it is your turn. 

6. Internet censorship 

In 2011 several foreign exchange students received fines for watching porn online ignoring Germany’s strict copyright laws. Streaming video is not always illegal, but still many youtube videos and websites are blocked and downloading illegally can get you fined with a couple hundred euros. 

7. Remembrance

German cities and towns are full of beautiful buildings and monuments honouring historic moments, great people and also victims of Nazi persecution. Signs with the names of the most famous concentration camps with a big “Remember” on top can also be found outside several train stations. Other common sights are the Stopelsteine which are small golden squares found on sidewalks with information of people killed or sent to concentration camps during WWII. 

8. Planning ahead

Germans love to plan ahead. You should have seen the face of my friend’s mom when I told her I had come from Mexico and had not yet found an apartment to live in Berlin. I ended up finding a place a week later but Germans tend to plan everything with lots of anticipation. Germans are not big on being spontaneous and feel more confortable when everything is carefully planned.

9. Beer is everywhere (and is everything) 

Germans love beer. Legal age for drinking is 16 and people can drink just about anywhere: the subway, streets and university cafeterias. It is common to see people sipping beer at 11 a.m. and on the train heading back from work. Broken bottles are a common sight on weekends and passed out people laying in their vomit inside the train becomes part of the occasional scenery after a couple of months (in Berlin). 


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10. Disinfecting food

My friend Valeria who is also Mexican and has lived in Germany for over two years now told me how she looked everywhere for fruit and vegetable disinfectant when she first arrived, but couldn’t find it. Germans don’t use it. Need to wash vegetables? fill the sink with water, throw the vegetables in and stir a little. In Mexico people usually take fruits and vegetables, place them in water and then add some drops of chlorine, iodine or other chemical to disinfect, so that was a strange thing I had to adapt to. 

11. Germans are the nicest people you’ll ever meet

I needed to end the list by saying that Germans are some of the nicest people I have met. The occasional douchebag is present, but Germans will go out of their way to explain things, show you their culture and cook for you. Germans will stuff you with their food, speak English to you when you have trouble getting your point across and buy you a beer when you need someone to talk to. Something I noticed as well is people buying extra loafs of bread for the homeless and young children helping the elderly cross streets, and most of all… Germans are fun! 

reasons people identify as bisexual

There are people who are bi because they have been attracted to someone who is nonbinary. 

There are people who are bi because they’re nonbinary.

There are people who are bi because they want to acknowledge that it’s possible they could someday be attracted to someone of another gender than they usually are; that regardless of their history, they are open to all possibilities. 

There are people who are bi because they are only ever interested in one gender, but at different points in their life the gender they’re attracted to has been different.

There are people who are bi because they are attracted equally, or similarly, to men and women, or equally or similarly to all genders.

There are people who are bi because they are attracted in totally different ways to all genders.

There are people who are bi because they’re attracted in totally different amounts to all genders.

There are people who are bi because they’re attracted in totally different ways and/or amounts to more than one gender.

There are people who are bi because they’re attracted in the same or similar ways to more than one gender.

There are people who are bi because they’re attracted the same amount or similar amounts to more than one gender.

There are people who are bi because they don’t believe in the gender binary.

There are people who are bi because they are attracted to the person, not their gender.

There are people who are bi because they are very attracted to gender – to more than one gender.

Am I forgetting anyone?

youtube

Um, Kesha is a magical bisexual blessing upon this sad cracked earth

That’s all

That, and I never want to listen to another song ever again

fun fact that i learned today: the inventor of the lie detector is also the creator of the character of wonder woman (which explains the lasso of truth) his name is william mouton marston he was also really into bondage culture which is visible in early wonder woman comics

slate.com
Dear Prudence: My wife insists on telling men she’s bisexual.

I am in love with this entire answer. It concludes with:

“She tells people, including men, that she’s bisexual because she’s bisexual. She’s not orchestrating a stealth future-cheating campaign. Imagine if your wife had red hair, and people occasionally and mistakenly referred to her as a brunette. You wouldn’t panic if she told them, ‘Actually, my hair’s red.’ You wouldn’t wonder what it might mean. It’s a piece of morally neutral information.

“Your wife says, 'Actually, I’m bisexual,’ and you hear, 'I’m only half in love with my wife and hoping to keep my options open while I look for a heterosexual exit.’ But all that she’s saying is that she’s bisexual. That’s it. You’re adding a lot of assumptions, fears, and insecurities to the mix. She’s in a relationship with a lesbian, but that doesn’t mean she’s in a lesbian relationship. She’s bisexual, and that’s important to her. Nothing you’ve told me suggests she neglects you or flirts with men in order to stoke your jealousy.

"I think you need to figure out why you feel so threatened by the fact that you married a bisexual woman. Were you hoping she’d change her mind or get over it? Why is it so important to you that she let other people assume she’s a lesbian? She’s with you. She married you. She’s out. She’s your wife. Nothing about your identity or your relationship is threatened by her sexuality in any way; it’s time for you to let go of this.”

African Influence in Salvador

Salvador, capital of the state of Bahia, was the first major port and the capital of colonial Brazil for almost two centuries. The city lies between green tropical hills and broad beaches along the bay of Todos os Santos. It was built on two levels with administration buildings and residences constructed on the hills; forts, docks, and warehouses on the beaches. To this day the city is still divided into upper and lower cities. From 1500 to 1815 Salvador was the nation’s busiest port. A significant portion of the sugar from the northeast and gold and diamonds from the mines in the southeast passed through Salvador. It was a golden age for the town; magnificent homes and churches resplendent in gold decoration were built. Many of the city’s baroque churches, private homes, squares, and even the hand-chipped paving bricks have been preserved as part of Brazil’s historic patrimony. In Salvador, more than anywhere else in the country, the African influence in the makeup of Brazilian culture is readily visible, from the spicy dishes still called by their African names (caruru, vatapa, acaraji), to the ceremonies of candomblé which honor both African deities and Catholic holidays, to the capoeira schools where a unique African form of ritualistic fighting is taught. Its population is around 2,250,000 inhabitants.

Location: Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Photographer: Celso Marino

joannalannister  asked:

Could I ask you to talk about your idea of Westeros as an iconophobic society? Also what about art patronage vs art collections? I love your thoughts!!

This was also something @him-e asked for so here we go! ( @maravding: I’ve only now seen your reblog and I’ll do another post for the Martells and Tyrells, it’s probably going to be short but this one turned out already long enough!)

I used “iconophobic” pretty broadly, I should probably have said “a culture that looks bizarrely uninterested in pictures considering that, if we have an idea of how people in the real life historical period ASoIaF is based on thought and looked like, it’s also because they left us a shitton of visual sources” (though iconophobic is probably right for the North, but that’s farther down in the post).

It’s certainly not an iconoclastic culture because there’s no apparent ideological or religious condemnation of pictures, they just don’t seem to feature very prominently in the way culture is shared, and I think this can be traced back to a couple of issues I have with the general worldbuilding in the series: late Medieval England as a template for Westeros, and Martin’s own bias as a writer.

Disclaimer: I *am* about to nitpick and this is not a dig at Martin’s ability as a writer and worldbuilder. I think that overall, the worldbuilding in ASoIaF is impressive: you get a feeling of a rich, tangible world especially wrt Westeros (Essos is a bit more stereotyped, Sothoryos even more so), and I guess that’s exactly why the corners that Martin doesn’t explore as thoroughly stand out to me.

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