cultural issues

Hey as a hindu who’s talked to many other hindus about it (and jewish people) can we just… drop excusing use of the swastika in western areas with the justification it’s a hindu symbol?

Like real talk, I don’t know how important it is to some people because hinduism is so varied, but nearly everyone I’ve talked to just doesn’t use it, and if you do I can’t imagine any particular reason to not keep it specific to your worship except straight up antisemitism.

Considering nearly every Jewish person I know said they’d feel afraid seeing it on someone/in someones house even if they knew it was hindu, because frankly having it on display is a blatant disregard for the feelings of Jewish people and the cultural issues they’ve faced & multiple hindu people said they’d feel uncomfortable seeing it in someones house as well.

It doesn’t matter if it originated and was used with good intentions. The historical significance and cultural associations we have can’t be ignored or avoided and neither can the fact that continuing to display it despite knowing the harm it causes Jewish people seems just.. not very hindu at all. 

Non-hindus welcome to reblog

You know I actually think that this apocalypse can’t come soon enough. This show is drowning itself in these Grounder politics and complications and issues with culture and whatnot and its getting very messy very fast and I honestly don’t know how else they can begin to fix it without hitting a reset button and wiping the board.

Its time to switch up the playing field. The Grounder vs Sky People storyline is way overdone and I’m ready for a change. I really think that using the melting nuclear power plants to do that would be the best thing for the show at this stage in the game. 

In retrospect, that might be why I loved Season 2 so much. It was just so distinctly different from the other seasons, in that it focussed on the conflict between the Sky People (plus the Grounders) and a completely new enemy instead of just Grounders vs Skaikru all over again.

Reproductive freedom is not a “social” or “cultural” issue—it is critical to women’s economic security and social equality. As the Supreme Court noted in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, “The ability of women to participate equally in the economic and social life of the Nation has been facilitated by their ability to control their reproductive lives.”

10

Identity 

French photographer duo Bruno Metra and Laurence Jeanson, collectively known as Metra-Jeanson, created a striking collection of photos that confront concepts of identity, beauty and otherness.

Experimenting with our visual perception, they apply cut outs of facial features from glossy magazines onto their model’s faces to create a new form of facial expression.

Grow with us @ Instagram.com/wetheurban

Franchesca Ramsey lands Comedy Central pilot

  • On Tuesday, Comedy Central announced that comedian Franchesca Ramsey ( @chescaleigh on Tumblr) secured a pilot for an untitled project for the network.
  • According to Comedy Central’s press release, Ramsey’s new show will feature a set of comedians that will tackle some of the most pressing social and political issues.
  •  The project will “will heal America through brutal comedy, surprising guests, and breakdowns of the most pressing cultural issues you never knew you cared about,” the release said.
  • Ramsey will also serve as executive producer of the show, alongside Eric Brown, Andrew Kornhaber and Kara Welker. Read more (4/19/17)

NOTE: This post has been corrected. It previously stated incorrectly that Ramsey is the first black woman to have a Comedy Central pilot. Jessica Williams developed a show with the network in 2016. 

Those perceptions that functioning in purity culture as an asexual girl is somehow easier are all complete nonsense.  

Sure, you may not have to bury yourself in shame for every sexual thought, but you’re still taught to see yourself as a commodity that you have no choice in giving away.  It might alleviate some of the pressure in the moment–give you an external excuse to avoid having sex right now–but it’s all about “saving it for your future husband.”  It’s training young girls to hinge their choices and their bodily autonomy off of a man they haven’t even met yet.  Everything comes back to the Imaginary Future Husband and his rights over you.  We were literally told how we’d be betraying him by kissing someone else, or having sexual thoughts about anyone but him.  You think there was any exception for those of us betraying him by not having interest in him at all?

Don’t want that husband?  Don’t want to have sex on your wedding night?  Too bad, that’s what you’re here for.  Bonus points on the relgious spin on the “soulmate” idea, where if you feel like this you’re resisting the Perfect Man god already has picked out for you–how dare you refuse his gift!  How ungrateful!

Purity culture is never about girls not ever having sex; it’s about men’s obsession with the idea of having a girl who has no sexual experiences but them.  It’s about putting control of women’s sexuality in the hands of men they haven’t even met yet.  It’s about keeping food unspoiled so you can eat it later.

A woman who always remains disinterested in sex isn’t seen as “keeping herself pure” forever–she’s seen as a piece of meat at the grocery store that no one buys and it just goes rotten and gets wasted.

theguardian.com
'We're the geeks, the prostitutes': Asian American actors on Hollywood's barriers
Films like Ghost in the Shell have fueled debate over whitewashing, while roles are few for Asian Americans – and when they are wanted on the casting couch, it’s often to play offensive stereotypes
By Sam Levin

Honored to have provided some choice terrible breakdowns for this article. Huge thanks to Sam Levin for writing!

Cultural Appropriation

What it is: Making a mockery of another culture by wearing innacurate or stereotypical garments, or wearing something culturally significant that needs to be ‘earned’ or is awarded.

What it is not: Learning another language, eating food from a different region of the world, taking part in the customs and traditions of another country, wearing clothes typically worn by a different culture, having a hairstyle that originated somewhere else globally, taking part in current pop culture including slang and music/dance trends.

Humans are weird

Ok, getting on the humans are weird bandwagon….

It surprises me that we haven’t talked about the most obvious thing: humans imagine things. Humans outright make shit up. (Like these posts?) Human stories often aren’t retellings of things that actually happened. Art often isn’t a depiction of true events. Humans - for want of a better word - humans sublimate. They transform their experiences into outlandish non-reality for each others’ amusement.

It takes forever for first contact to start because the aliens planning it keep getting confused by first radio, then television. Some of these depictions can’t be possible - but which ones? The first time War of the Worlds reaches the Kuiper belt, someone panics and has to double check that a more aggressive group hasn’t actually invaded.

After humans are finally integrated into galactic culture, some issues crop up.

“Did you clean the waste facility?” the Janitorial Supervisor asks.

“Well, I would have,” the human starts, then proceeds to tell an outrageous story about a cleaning bot with a knife strapped to its back which has the entire crew searching the ship for hours. The entire crew except for the humans.

The Captain finds the humans “searching” the self-poisoning cabinet in one of the crew quarters.

“Oh my god,” the First Officer says, on seeing the Captain’s dust-speckled upper ears. “Oh my god, I can’t believe you really fell for that. Stabby is a cryptid, Harold!”

The Captain’s name is not Harold, but that is another, even longer story.

The Captain exhales. “What is a cryptid?”

The assistant medical officer sits up straighter, his drink sloshing dangerously. The Captain has learned what “a gleam in his eye” means and how to detect it. They sit, resigned. There’s no escaping now.

An hour later, the Captain explains the concept of cryptids in considerably less detail to the embarrassed and confused Supervisor. Along with the concept of lying.

“But how do you know the difference?” the Supervisor asks, wringing their tentacles in mixed embarrassment and worry.

“Find another human,” the Captain advises. “Check for signs of mirth.”

This turns out to be prescient, because on their next planetary stop, two of the human field officers come running back into the base camp, out of breath and without the rest of their scouting team.

“Nasty buggers with teeth!” one gasps. Though the other officers appear skeptical, the Captain glances at the First Officer, who is already setting down her meal and grabbing her favorite flamethrower. The assistant medical officer yanks his kit straps over his shoulders, face grim.

“Arm yourselves,” the Captain tells the rest.

It takes about four hours, but they get everyone back more or less intact. The humans change the sign in the rec room on the ship to read: “Us: 6, Them: 0″. There is a ritual raising of liquor-filled glasses, even by the injured who are forbidden self-poisoning. The Captain begins temporary hibernation very relieved that humans are so willing to count other species as “us”.

When they ask the First Officer about it two cycles later, the First Officer looks confused, then knowing.

“My great grandmother remembers when you first showed up. They picked your people for first contact for a reason, didn’t they?”

“We look the most like you.”

“Yeah, well, that was a bad call. Gran says humans debated for months whether or not you were just other humans with good prosthetic makeup.”

The Captain blinks at this. “Most peoples are shocked and upset to learn the rest of the sentient universe does not share their appearance. Wait.” They pause. “Is that why we had so many applicants for the Janitorial position?”

The First Officer ignores that, as she usually does when the Captain doesn’t really want to know the answer.

“Do you know why cryptids exist? Why horror and violence and monsters exist in our stories?” she asks instead.

The Captain twitches both sets of ears ‘no’. “It seems unnecessary to frighten yourselves over things that don’t exist.”

“But nasty buggers with teeth do exist, even if we haven’t met them yet,” she says grimly. “And we were ready, weren’t we?”

It’s true. The humans on board have been terrifyingly adaptable, even in their violence.

The Captain feels their way carefully. “You think about things that don’t exist… sometimes even things that distress and terrify you… so that you can be ready when you face real things that distress and terrify you?”

“See, this is why you’re the Captain, Harold.” The First Officer slaps their shoulder hump cheerfully, careful to avoid the spines. “And better yet, we share the things we imagine with each other. It’s like a mental vaccine.”

“And it works?”

“Eh, sometimes. It’s not perfect. Sometimes we don’t mark our vaccines properly, or don’t realize we’re adding things we didn’t mean to. Some of them have a bad effect on some people, for various reasons. But we joined the galactic community in less than a generation. Has any other species ever done that?”

“You imagined us before you met us.”

“Now you’re getting it.”

But the Comedy Central pilot with the most tantalizing potential might actually be a still-to-be-titled project from comedian, YouTube star, activist, and onetime Nightly Show contributor Franchesca Ramsey, who plans to round up “the most diverse set of comedians on TV” to “heal America through brutal comedy, surprising guests, and breakdowns of the most pressing cultural issues you never knew you cared about.” Given the mixed reaction to the network’s recent decision to name Jordan Klepper—”yet another white guy,” as some detractors of the decision pointed out—as Larry Wilmore’s replacement, and many Daily Show fans’ dashed dreams of Jessica Williams taking over for Jon Stewart, it seems high time that a black woman got her shot at a politi-splainer program on Comedy Central—even if the concept is a little well-worn right now. Assuming the series gets green-lit, this one could make history.

oh my god!!!

Why couldn’t Henwick be the star of “Iron Fist”? Or another actor of Asian descent? After all, part of what made “Jessica Jones” and “Luke Cage” stand out were the distinct identities and concerns their protagonists carried into battle. Imagine an “Iron Fist” in which an Asian actor with a great deal of presence and real fighting chops (which Jones lacks) plays a man trying to reclaim his business empire from a group of white characters who don’t trust him and underestimate his skills. Those kinds of social, political, and moral clashes among specific characters and cultures could have amped up the drama — assuming the episodes didn’t take forever to establish relationships and dilemmas.

Even if you can put aside issues of cultural appropriation — and the ham-fisted “Iron Fist” doesn’t make that easy, given that it feeds its yoga-bro lead character a series of inert lines about Shaolin wisdom and Buddhist teachings — this superhero drama just feels inessential.

170320 Wale & BTS' Rap Monster Team Up for Politically Tinged 'Change': Watch

Months after connecting over Twitter, Wale and BTS’ Rap Monster teamed up to release “Change” on Sunday. The track is an East-meets-West, politically fraught banger filled with the pair’s hopes for a better world.

“Change” features Rap Monster, dubbed “RM” for the release, and Wale trading off verses about societal ills, primarily those currently causing divisiveness in the U.S. With the duo criticizing the “alt-right,” Twitter’s ability to “kill,” “racist police” and declaring “no faith in the government,” the unrestrained hip-hop track is one of the most progressive songs yet from the socially aware boy band BTS.

Though most K-pop acts shy away from politicizing their music, or even touching on seemingly controversial topics, the Rap Monster-led K-pop act has addressed politics and cultural issues in their songs on multiple occasions, with a particular focus on youth-related issues such as mental health, bullying and suicide. The atypical approach has made BTS fan favorites in the U.S., leading to them becoming the highest-ranked K-pop act ever on the Billboard 200.

The song also features a variety of puns and plays on words, including references to ARMY, BTS’ fandom, and Wale’s chart-topping “Folarin Like,” which itself had a nod to the Korean boy band.

The English-language collaborative track was released several months after Wale tweeted at Rap Monster in November, asking if he wanted to work together after discovering through a fan’s tweet that Rap Monster had previously freestyled over Wale’s “Illest Bitch.”

The two rappers got together in South Korea in March to record the track and film the accompanying music video. The video for “Change” features the pair washed-out by DayGlo hues as they drop their rhymes over depictions of people from different social strata, some actively changing their lives while others are, literally, strangled by technology.

Wale and Rap Monster made the mixtape available for free through links tweeted out by BTS’ agency, Big Hit Entertainment.

“Change” was released just days before BTS begins the North American leg of their Wings tour at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, on Thursday night. One of the few K-pop acts to hold concerts in U.S. stadium venues, the group’s popularity was proved when they were forced to add additional dates after initially selling out.

Watch the music video for “Change” here.

© billboard

One of the things that really bothers me is that whenever a POC person says that white people have no culture is that white people (most likely Americans or Western Europeans) immediately resort to proving white people have culture by using a ton of examples from Slavic and generally Eastern European cultures. It’s extremely ironic because those same people groups perpetuate anti-EE sentiments from the Cold war and treat Slavic people and generally Eastern Europeans as “backwards” and “savage”, but when Eastern European cultures can be used as a tool in racial conflicts they will be.

savaka7  asked:

Here's a fun fact: "Idiot" should be more offensive than "retarded" because "retarded" means someone with an IQ of 70 or less, while "idiot" (when the term was in use) meant someone with an IQ of 25 or less

That’s actually very very interesting. That’s where the culture issue comes in. We give words the value they’re not supossed to have.

And that’s different in every country.

Female Korean-American Teenager

Hi, I’m Caroline, and as the title states, I’m a female Korean-American teen currently living in a town that’s 80% white. The majority of East Asians living here are Japanese, and over the years, there have been a few sprinklings of new Korean or Chinese families moving in. For the most part, however, my family was the only Korean family in town when we first came here. This heavily impacted my childhood - made me ashamed of my culture and ethnicity - and of course, the racism that I constantly faced from classmates, parents, teachers, and sometimes even friends, was exhausting. 

It means so much to me to see Korean-American characters - or any person of color, really - be represented in today’s books, TV shows, movies, etc. For once, I’d like to see fully-fleshed out, complex characters who are people of color - not just the 2D stereotypes that too many forms of media put them out to be. So if a few more writers out there become less ignorant due to this post, I’ll be forever grateful. 

So. Let’s do this thing!

Beauty Standards 

Most East Asians represented in today’s media have extremely straight, practically black hair. And while it’s true that straight, black hair is the most common trait regarding hair amongst Koreans, there are (*gasp*) a few of us with curly hair, too. (Moi.) To the Koreans I knew, anyways, my hair was always an object of envy. I’d frequently be asked if I got the perm, and whenever I said I had naturally curly hair, there’d be a lot of “oh, how lucky"s going around. That made me feel pretty special, only it’d last for a short while before the reality of living in a mostly-white neighborhood kicked in, where my curly hair was usually made fun of. (Usually saying that Asians don’t have curly hair. Whatever. On the whole scale of racist comments I’ve been sent, the one about my hair is the least bothersome. When I was a kid, it bothered me a lot, though, and I think to some extent, it still bothers me at least a teeny bit - I actually started to straighten my hair when I went into eighth grade. Yup, give me the Hypocrite of the Year Award. I still need some adjustments.) 

Amongst Koreans, there’s also a lot of emphasis on having a small face, long and skinny legs, a fairly short torso…essentially, Koreans thrive for the typical European figure. Koreans, however, have pretty round faces, short and stalky legs, and long torsos for the most part. (With the exception of a few - and of course, the option for plastic surgery is always out there. I shit you not, almost every Korean woman I know have at least either (a) known someone who went through plastic surgery or (b) have been in plastic surgery myself. It’s a big deal in South Korea. My grandma had surgery done to her eyes twice, my mom’s friend had surgery done to her nose and her eyes, and my aunt’s brother is actually a plastic surgeon who does operations a number of times a day.) 

Clothing 

Growing up, I wore the typical American clothing - except for on special occasions, like my first birthday or New Year’s. On those days, I’d wear a hanbok, which is a traditional Korean gown with lots of colors and embroidery. The men would wear traditional clothing as well, and it’s customary for Koreans to wear these especially on New Year’s. Now, since my brothers and I have outgrown our hanboks, we just stick to American clothes on New Year’s. 

Daily Struggles 

Though I tell all my white friends and classmates that my first language is English, my first language was actually Korean. I don’t say that my first language is Korean anymore because firstly, I don’t want people to think of me as someone who only speaks Korean and secondly, I don’t know how to speak Korean anymore. It’s sad, really, because I can understand Korean much better than my siblings and my cousins, and there are moments when I can almost remember a phrase, but as of now, speaking the language is an extreme difficulty and embarrassment to me, especially when I’m surrounded by elders. (And usually, the only things I can say to them are ‘hello’ and ‘thank you’ and ‘goodbye’.) It’s frustrating to speak to older Koreans and know exactly what they’re saying but only being able to respond in English. 

That being said, growing up, I often had to translate - more specifically, re-translate - for my mother, who didn’t know English at all when I was a child. She used to feel incredibly lonely for it, and often times, she’d feel frustrated and cry about how all of the white mothers acted like she was an idiot for not knowing English. As an extreme social butterfly, this really hurt my mother, and it hurt her even more when her own children were starting to distance themselves because of the language barrier. I remember having to sit with my mother on the couch and help her learn English - and it was, to be honest, one of the saddest experiences I’ve ever had to go through. She’d grow frustrated with herself, and she’d hate every bit of it, I could tell, but she kept going because she wanted to be there for her kids. (She eventually got her American citizenship, too, but by doing so, she had to give up her Korean citizenship. Most East Asian countries don’t allow dual citizenships.) And though I don’t speak Korean anymore, I actually continue to re-translate things for my mother - in other words, I just have to simplify the English a little bit to get her to understand what someone else is saying. (This method works for anyone else who is struggling with English. Simplify the words, that’s all - but don’t treat the person with disrespect.) 

And, of course, there’s the very exhausting series of questions that come with being Korean. The most annoying and frustrating are (but not limited to) - 

  • “Oh, so are you South Korean or North Korean?” (Bruh. If I was North Korean, there’s a VERY slim chance I’d be in America right now. I’d still be stuck in North Korea, wouldn’t I?) 
  • “But what’s your nationality?” (American.) “No, I mean your REAL nationality.“ 
  • “What are you? Japanese? Chinese? Vietnamese?” (For some reason, NO ONE GUESSES KOREAN.) 
  • “Wow, your English is great!” (???) 
  • “English is your best subject? Wait, then what about math?” (…) 
  • “I bet you’re super smart!” (…I study hard, yeah, but that has nothing to do with the fact that I’m Korean.) 
  • “Oh, my God, Koreans are SO hot.” (Ew. Times a thousand.) 

Dating and Relationships 

My parents are pretty strict about my nonexistent love life. If my dad had it his way, I wouldn’t be allowed to date until I’m out of college. But for real talk, my mom’s actually the one who’s much pickier on who I date. She told me since I was a kid that it’d be best for me to date (and marry) another Korean-American. She means this out of the goodness of her heart - mostly that she wants me to marry someone who I can connect with culturally. (“Regular Koreans will be too grounded into Korea. You need someone with similar experiences.”) My dad just doesn’t want me to date anyone Japanese - and while I find this wrong, it’s mostly due to the bad blood between Korea and Japan. (World War II, the Korean War, comfort women, etc.) 

And because of this prejudice against Japanese people, my dad always found it difficult to accept that I had a few Japanese friends. He often wanted me to stray away from other Eastern-Asians in general, American or not. (Unless, of course, it was for dating/marrying.) This was because he didn’t want me to become a part of “THAT Asian group”, which, let me just say, is pretty sad, because when there’s a group of white kids hanging around, no one finds it strange. When there’s a big group of x friends of x race, it’s suddenly SUCH an odd sight. 

Food 

This is where I try to restrain myself for real. 

The most common foods you’ll find at a Korean dinner table are rice, kimchi (which is basically spicy pickled cabbage - lots of Koreans eat it, but I personally never did. And I still don’t. Oops), kim (pronounced keem - basically roasted and dried, slightly salted seaweed strips. Which are really good), along with a number of side-dishes and maybe one big, main dish. (Mostly meat.) 

Favorite Korean dishes include

  • seolleongtang, a lightly salted broth with oxtail meat, or sometimes some other kind of meat. There’s usually a sprinkling of scallions, and rice or noodles can be served inside. 
  • kalbi, the famous Korean BBQ. Just imagine meat being prepared directly in front of you served with veggies. Delicious, but be warned - your burps will stink - and I mean stink - afterwards. Its variant, kalbi jim, are slow-cooked short ribs served often with Korean-style steamed potatoes and carrots. Just as good. 
  • tangsuyuk, sweet and sour (mostly sweet, I think, anyways,) pork. The pork is covered with a batter that is fried and then typically dunked in sweet sauce. Some people like to have the sauce on the side so they can dip it in - and still save the crunch. It’s a personal preference. 
  • buchimgae, otherwise known as Kimchi Pancakes. Korean pancakes are not your typical breakfast pancakes. They’re made in a pan, like regular breakfast pancakes, but inside, there’s an assortment of seafood, veggies, and in this version, kimchi. (There are spicy and non-spicy versions). 
  • tteokbokki, spicy rice cakes. Very chewy and again, pretty spicy. 

Favorite Korean sweets/desserts/snacks include 

  • tteok, sweet rice cakes. There are many different kinds of rice cake, usually with flavors of classical red bean or green tea. The favorite of many children is the classical rainbow tteok, where the rice cakes are dyed with strips of green, pink, and yellow. The flavor of plain tteok is actually not too sweet, but it’s still a very classic, very traditional and cultural Korean dessert that cannot be skipped over. 
  • yakbap, a very special type of sweet rice cake all on its own. This is a favorite amongst many, and the rice is prepared in a way that it’s sticky and brown. Pine nuts, chestnuts, and jujubes as well as raisins are mixed in. 
  • patbingsu, a frozen dessert. Think of an evolved form of shave ice with toppings like red bean paste, nuts, and fruit. Extremely popular in South Korea, not to mention one of its most iconic desserts. 
  • saeoosnek, shrimp-flavored crackers. Again, a very popular snack that’s exactly what it sounds like. Crackers. With. Shrimp. Flavoring. 
  • choco pie, a popular chocolate-marshmallow cake that looks similar to America’s moon pie. Extremely popular amongst children. 

Holidays 

In my family, we never celebrated the direct Korean celebrations, but we always celebrated the Korean New Year the traditional way. Again, usually dressed in hanbok, children (and parents) would bow down to the oldest members of the family and pay their respects with a traditional phrase. They also have to perform a special bow three times while saying this phrase. (There are two different bows - one for men, one for women.) Once doing so, the elder usually gives a blessing to the family members and presents them with an envelope of money, very similar to the traditional Chinese red envelope they receive on their New Year’s celebration. 

Another traditional Korean celebration my family - and many other Korean families, I’m sure - celebrate is the 100 Days birthday. 

A brief history lesson - back when Korea was suffering due to the economy failing, it was a rare occurrence to ever see a child live past one hundred days. Once one hundred days had passed, then the family would rejoice and throw a large celebration, inviting friends, extended family members. There’d be lots of food and laughter and different rituals all dedicated to the child. Now, of course, Korea’s economic situation is not the same as it was back then, but we still hold these celebrations for tradition and cultural reasons. 

One of the most important rituals in the 100 Days birthday is sitting the baby down in front of a variety of items - usually a coin, a pen, a length of twine, a book, food, and sometimes other variants of those items. If the child picks up a coin, then it is to be predicted that this child will live a wealthy life. If the child picks up a pen or a book, then it is to be predicted that this child will grow to become a scholar. If the child picks up food, then it is to be predicted that this child will never go hungry. If the child picks up the length of twine (or sometimes string or a spool of thread), then it is to be predicted that this child will live a long life. Some families believe in this, others don’t, but either way, this ritual is performed because hey, tradition! (And besides, it makes for pretty cute pictures.) 

Home/Family Life 

Korean families and Korean home-life, I feel, will always have a different atmosphere from white families. Most Korean parents are very reserved when it comes to public displays of affection for their children, though like all families, this can vary. Independence and learning how to grow an outer shell is very important to the Korean lifestyle. This doesn’t mean that Korean parents don’t love their children - of course they do, and again, all Korean families work differently. However, this pattern and discipline is a common thing to find in most Korean families. 

There’s a certain emphasis on studying - and no, not all Korean parents are super strict about grades and threaten to beat their children if they get a B on a report card. (At least, my parents didn’t.) However, education is still considered a top priority. Studying is encouraged, and most Korean parents want to see their children secure a good job (ie doctor, lawyer, engineer, etc). Most of the time, Korean parents just want to see their children live a secured life. That’s it. At least, with my parents, everything they ever taught me or told me had something to do with me learning to survive when I become older. I used to resent this when I was a kid, but now that I’ve grown more mature, I actually find myself appreciating everything my parents have ever taught me. 

Another note - when a Korean woman marries, she is cut off from her birth family and is considered to only be a part of her husband’s family. This limits her visits to her own birth family - and though this was a common thing before, I believe many Korean families don’t operate the same way anymore. (Some traditions last longer than others.) 

Elders are respected. Period. Even if s/he’s getting on your nerves, you ALWAYS RESPECT THE ELDERS. 

Shoes are taken off before entering a house. No exceptions to this rule. If you wanna impress your Korean friend, take off your damn shoes. This will be appreciated. 

Things I’d like to see less of. 

  • people thinking that “all Koreans get hot when they’re older”. (FETISHIZATION IS A BIG NO-NO.)
  • Koreans being seen as submissive and docile creatures. (Note how I said creatures and not humans. Because that’s how some people treat Koreans and other East Asians. Like we’re creatures, rather than actual human beings.) 
  • Koreans being seen as kickass ninjas. (It’s either docile creatures or kickass ninjas. There’s never a line between the two, and it’s exhausting.) 
  • “Koreans are so romantic!” (Sorry, that’s the K-drama binge talking. If anything, Koreans are pretty reserved when it comes to PDA and again, affection in general. Of course, I can’t speak for all Koreans, but at least with my family, PDA was always kept to a minimum. Usually a quick peck on the lips, kisses on the cheek, hand-holding, etc. Never an actual full kiss in public. Forget about make-out sessions.) 
  • Stone-cold Koreans. (Again, there’s either the romantic Korean or the Terminator Korean. Never an in-between. Yes, keep in mind that due to cultural reasons, Koreans don’t typically display affection. THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT WE DON’T DISPLAY EMOTIONS.) 
  • Straight-A Koreans. Typically good at math and science. (While yes, many East Asian countries and families put emphasis on these subjects, not all Koreans happen to be extreme nerds who cry at a B on a report card. Example A - I happen to stink at math. And I know many other Asian-Americans who also stink at math. So.) 
  • Assuming Korean parents are abusive. (While there are many abusive Korean parents out there, people need to stop assuming that right off the bat. Stop. It’s extremely disrespectful, not to mention just wrong?!) 

Things i’d like to see more of. 

  • complex, well-rounded Korean characters. (Give me a Korean character who hates math but still tries to do well in class. Give me a Korean character who’s bisexual and surrounded by loving family members. Give me a Korean character who likes roller-skating and getting high in the bathroom stalls and sings Jackson 5 all day. Give me a Korean character who goes out to be homecoming queen and buffs her nails while fighting demons. Give me a Korean character who cries, laughs, talks, breathes, LIVES like an actual human being, and you’ll get the respect of hundreds - maybe thousands - of readers and viewers who’ve been waiting for so long to be properly represented.) 
Stupid stuff people said to me in 2015 about my heritage

“Wait, if you’re Indian, why is your skin so white?" 

"Wow, you look weird in Indian clothes." 

"You speak good English for an Indian person. You could almost be white!" 

"Do they have buildings in India?" 

"Do you guys all ride around on Elephants?" 

"Whats with the dot today?" 

"Why do your clothes look so funny?" 

"Are you Hindi?" 

"Do you eat monkey brains?" 

"Everyone in India is uneducated." 

"Would your parents honour kill you?" 

"Aren’t Hindus and Sikhs the same thing though?" 

"You’re so lucky you don’t look like other Indian people." 

"Are you here legally?" 

"What’s with you guys and all that rice?" 

"Why does all Indian food smell like shit?" 

"You’re not in India anymore. Forget about that stupid culture." 

"You come from the third world, this is the first world. We have shit that actually works here." 

 All this and more! 

*fuming*

regarding the bts dread hat issue

as a barbadian who sees the rasta/jamaican hats sold in her own island as a tourist souvenir, i just want to say that in my, and many other caribbean armys, opinion, taehyung and jungkook did nothing wrong. they went to a jamaican restaurant and were given the hats as souvenirs from the jamaican owners. if they were to come to the exact same island of jamaica, or many other caribbean islands, they would have been given the same kind of hats. they’re sold here for the tourists and a lot of people make their living off of selling these kinds of things in the tourist industry places. if they would have come to the caribbean, a local auntie would have even braided their hair if they wanted. 

in this case, it really is an issue of cultural sharing. the jamaican owners gave them those hats as a souvenir for visiting their restaurant. it’s not like they decided to don the dreads to act all gangsta for a concept they’ll discard in 3 months. i know people have their own opinions, but i feel as if people aren’t listening to the actual jamaican/caribbean armys about this. the vast majority of jamaican/caribbean armys understand that the hats were given to them as souvenirs, or even gifts for visiting the restaurant, and these same kinds of hats are sold in caribbean islands frequently as a souvenir for the many non-caribbean tourists. 

i’d appreciate it if people listened to us more, all i’m seeing is people talking over us saying “i dont care if jamaican armys say its okay i know its wrong” when this is a part of the jamaican/caribbean tourist industry. our tourism industry is built on sharing our culture with visitors, and part of that includes hats like these as souvenirs. 

so yeah… i just wanted to give a little insight as an actual caribbean army into the situation.