cultivar

i love little shop of horrors bc seymour is like “i guess ill feed this dangerous carnivorous plant some of my own blood :/” and the audience is supposed to be like NOOOOOOO DONT DO IT!!!! but like its so funny bc we’re really pretending that if any carnivorous plant hobbyist came across a previously unknown and dangerous carnivorous plant that needed blood to grow they wouldn’t at least consider this option. like if you have ever witnessed a carnivorous plant chat or forum for .4 seconds u would know that if little shop of horrors happened irl you bet ur ass the carni community could not be trusted to put human priorities before the priorities of a strange carnivorous plant species bought for $1.25

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The Hunchback of  Notre dame - Frollo Grapes

“Buenos Dias Esmeralda” - Frollo

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • Grapes

HOW TO MAKE IT

1. Before planting bare root vines, soak the roots in water for 3-4 hours. At planting, remove all canes except the most vigorous one. Plant vines with the lowest bud on the cane just above the soil surface. Trim off any broken or excessively long roots. Dig a hole large enough to you can spread the root system out then cover the roots completely with soil. Mulching is not usually recommended for grapes because mulch will moderate the soil temperature, often keeping it cooler in warmer months, and grape vines grow best in warmer soil.

After planting, water the vines regularly throughout the first year. The root system needs to grow and establish to allow for shoot growth in the first year. 

Grapevines need some type of support or they will trail along the ground. The support can be an arbor covering a patio for shade, or can be as simple as a post in the ground to support the trunk of the vine. Grapevines can also be grown along an existing fence. Virtually any type of support structure will do, provided it is sturdy. Grape vines grow quickly and get quite heavy.

Once the trunk has reached as high as you want, and the lateral trunks have been formed, prune the vine each spring before growth begins so the developing canes have enough air movement around them to reduce diseases. There are many different methods and techniques for training vines; we recommend you experiment with pruning vines to make them an integral part of your landscape. Remember, fruit is produced on the current season’s growth, that in turn grows from last season’s wood. Heavy pruning provides the best fruit. Light pruning results in large yields of poor-quality fruit; very heavy pruning produces too much vegetative growth and very little or no fruit. 

The best way to tell if grapes are ripe is to taste a few. Many cultivars turn color before they are ripe. To harvest, clip full clusters off the vine with pruning shears or heavy scissors. Handle clusters carefully; remove any discolored, injured, or undesirable berries; and then cool them as soon as they are picked. 

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For @frollosuggestions

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Plant of the Day

Thursday 14 September 2017

There are more than 3,000 varieties of heirloom or heritage tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivars being grown worldwide and more than 15,000 known varieties. Here are a few cultivars in a small demonstration glasshouse at the Royal Horticultural Society garden at Harlow Carr, UK, reminding me that autumn is here.

Jill Raggett

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Pink to White 1

If you have been reading my blog for a while you might already know I have a preference for white, blue and yellow/orange flowers above all. I have nothing against pink and its shades, but I just don’t find it as interesting as the others and looking through my photos I noticed I have a good collection of white-coloured versions of common pink flowers, whether they are horticultural cultivars, naturally-occurring variations or very closely related species, as I tend to photograph them whenever I see them. I will post them a few at a time as part of a series that I might expand as I keep taking photos, it’s nothing more than a curiosity, but if you share my feelings about colour and want to add some variety to your garden, this might interest you.

1. Digitalis purpurea & Digitalis purpurea ‘Alba’

2. Geranium robertianum & Geranium robertianum ‘Album’

3. Chamaenerion angustifolium &  Chamaenerion angustifolium ‘Album’


Note: the Latin adjective ‘albus, alba, album’ simply means ‘white’ and can be part of the species name, as in Lamium album, or it can identify the cultivar, as in the examples above. 

The Etiquette of Herb-Gathering

As a practicing Witch and small-scale herbalist, I often find that when I’m out and about I’m also absentmindedly on the lookout for any new, interesting or useful herb species that might help me in my practice. I even carry a small clean jam jar and a sharp penknife in my handbag at all times for if I spot a herb I just can’t resist and need to take a cutting of it for my collection back home. However, while I’m avidly seeking out roadside feverfew or happily snipping cuttings of a rare cultivar of lavender or sage, I’m always acutely aware of why I call the etiquette of herb-gathering.

These are a few simple rules by which I suggest all foraging Witches, alchemists and herbalists should abide that dictate the correct course of action for those who seek to collect herbs from places other than their own gardens. They are mostly fairly common-sense, but a few are ones that might be overlooked, but which can actually be of profound importance!

I will list the rules below, but bear in mind that it’s not like this is some onerous obligation that must be fulfilled, and nor is it some sort of “Witchcraft commandment” or infallible and unchanging list of sacred laws. These are a few things that I created for my own usage, and nobody else is under any obligation to use them. If you choose to do so, I’ll be thrilled; if you find a way to improve them, please do reblog this post with your corrections! 

The Etiquette of Herb-Gathering

  1. Remember that all plants are living things, and if you harvest them too severely, they will die. This seems obvious, but you’d be shocked how many people forget! This is especially important when what you’re harvesting is the plant’s leaves - always remember that leaves are how plants make their food, so leave enough of them to enable the plant to keep growing strongly.

  2. Never forget that you may not be the only one foraging. Make sure that, when you harvest a wild growth of a herb, there may be others in the area who would also like to harvest that plant. Take only a little from a lot of patches, rather than using only two or three patches, but taking almost all of what is available at each one. This will not only ensure that other foragers can use that patch too, but will mean that when the patch regrows, you’ll know where to go back to in order to find it again instead of needing to hunt down a new patch each time.

  3. When foraging on another’s land, ask their permission first! This seems so straightforward, but sadly people forget that plants growing in other people’s gardens (yes, even their front lawn) are that person’s private property! Taking cuttings or fruits from plants on that property without the owner’s permission is legally theft, and can be punished just like shoplifting or stealing a bike from a railing. It also means that the owner will know that their plant is looking smaller because it’s been harvested, rather than them thinking it’s died or been eaten by some wild herbivore.

  4. Always cut stems at a diagonal angle. Never snip a stem so that it forms a circular, blunted end, because this can allow rainwater to build up on the surface of the cut. This rainwater can trap fungal spores, and cause the plant to get a serious fungal infection that may damage or even kill that whole patch. Instead, cut the stems at a roughly 45° angle, so that water beads up and rolls off more easily. 

  5. When collecting flowers, remember that other people like to look at wildflowers. Never take ALL the flowers from any wild plant, both because it prevents that plant from reproducing as it naturally wants to do, and because it means others who walk past the plant don’t get to see it’s beautiful blooms! If you own the plant, that’s another matter - you may WANT to snip off all flowers to prevent it from bolting, like with parsley. However, with wildflowers, always leave at least half the flowers on the plant so that it can continue to reproduce as nature intended.

  6. Never pick a plant you can’t identify with total certainty. Yet another seemingly-obvious one that is nevertheless often ignored. This is often quoted for fungi, because some fungi can be quite poisonous, but if anything it’s even worse for plants. The medicinally fabulous plant known as yarrow, Achillea millefolia, is a very useful plant and a common component of herbal medicines. However, it looks almost identical to spotted water-hemlock, a species of plant so deadly that one bite can kill you in 20 minutes. Make completely certain that all plants you collect are positively identified, and that you flag all plants with commonly-confused poisonous cousins for further identification later if you’re not 100% sure.

  7. Never harvest flowers from plants around beehives. Bees are one of the most important families in the natural world, being responsible for the pollination of tens of thousands of species of flowering plants all over the world and on every forested continent. Whilst most species of bees are solitary, and don’t form the large hives we assume are common to all bees, those that DO form vast colonies need similarly vast numbers of flowers to support themselves. When you come across a beehive, especially a boxed hive that’s clearly domesticated by humans, try to avoid harvesting any flowers from within 500 metres (about a third of a mile) around the hive(s). The hive needs all the nectar and pollen it can get, and due to the rising threat of colony collapse disorder the life of every single hive is a precious thing that must be preserved at all costs. It might be inconvenient for you, but it’s worth it.

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These are just a few of the major rules that I personally suggest all foragers and herb-gatherers take to heart. Remember that you’re not the only Witch who needs their supplies! Thank you for reading :)

– Juniper

Eu quero ser o motivo do sorriso de alguém. Quero dormir e acordar tendo a certeza de que sou amada de verdade. Quero me lembrar porque me apaixonei, quando existir uma discussão. Eu quero ter medo de perder alguém por besteira. Quero me sentir protegida quando algo me atingir. E quero proteger a pessoa que é a minha felicidade. Só desejo sentir o amor que fazem muitas pessoas lutarem para não perder, aquele sentimento puro e sincero que poucos têm a sorte de cultivar e florescer. Mesmo que no fim não sobre nada além de saudade. Se for amor, terá valido a pena.
—  De amores rasos eu já estou cheia.