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But there is no denying that it’s hip to be square. 

1) Fluorite - La Facciata quarry, Carrara, Apuan Alps, Massa-Carrara Province, Tuscany, Italy 

2) Rare, deep royal blue Halite on Sylvite - PCA Intrepid Potash Mine, Carlsbad, New Mexico

3) Fluorite and Zeunerite - Montoso Quarries, Bagnolo Piemonte, Cuneo Province, Piedmont, Italy Photo by: Giuseppe Finello

4) Purple fluorite on baryte. Photo by: Mario Miglioli 

5) Pyrite with purple fluorite inclusions

6) Pallasite Meteorite

7) Iron Meteorite

8) Paulingite - Czech Republic

9) Fluorite - El Hammam Mine, Meknès-Tafilalet Region, Morocco 

10)  Fluorite, Minerva Mine, Hardin Co., Illinois, USA.  Photo: DI Anton Watzl

The microscopic world takes on shapes and forms that we thought were merely an invention of our own minds.  This further amplifies the notion that geometry is a fundamental component of this universe.

When you look at photographs from an electron microscope, you may also notice other naturally-occurring patterns that exist on a larger, visible scale.  This is a reflection of the Principle of Correspondence: the microcosm reflects the macrocosm; “as above, so below.”