cuba baby!

4

remember you belong to me

this started with just alfred and arthur but then became a 1770s colonial!americas sketchdump. because i was just thinking how the american revolutionary war didn’t take place in a vacuum- all the resulting political developments did have an impact on other colonies too. and the inherent irony of the french and spanish empires supporting the 13 colonies, you know? 

(mexico and haiti are my ocs!)

3

there’s a lot of hetalia fanart about 18th century america and england, but i was thinking how all this other stuff was going on at the same time…

2

A woman has HIV. She becomes pregnant. What are the chances that she can deliver a baby who is not infected?

In some countries, like Yemen, for example, only 11 percent of pregnant women with HIV receive treatment to prevent their babies from being infected. For women who aren’t part of that fortunate group, the chance of passing HIV to their infant is as high as 45 percent.

But in Cuba, the chances are now practically nil. On June 30, Cuba became the first country to receive what can be seen as a global seal of approval — the World Health Organization validation — for essentially eliminating transmission of AIDS from a mother to her baby. (Cuba has eliminated transmission of syphilis as well.)

That doesn’t mean Cuba is on a pedestal all by itself. By 2014, more than 40 countries were testing and treating more than 95 percent of pregnant women; some places, including Anguilla, Barbados, Canada, Montserrat, Puerto Rico and the United States, have likely hit the mark as well. But Cuba is the first to go through the WHO monitoring program, which requires data on transmission for at least two years and an on-site visit by WHO members examining care in all parts of the country, including remote, impoverished and underserved areas.

Here’s how Cuba did it.

Cuba Is First To Earn WHO Seal For Ending Mother-Baby HIV Transmission

Photos: Courtesy of Pan American Health Organization/WHO