cross platforms

The love interests through the mains’ phones

SKAM is a multimedia/cross platform show, so it only make sense that how characters interact with their friends through social media is important.

I think we’re getting important information through how the mains have been naming their love interest in their phone (I’m skipping Eva because she was already dating Jonas and therefore had him as…Jonas).

Noora had Dickhelm as “Willhelm”, the name she used to neg him. The name she kept in her phone as a way to “neg” the feelings she had for him. During a big part of the season, Noora lied to herself about her feelings for him, refusing to call him by his given name (which I understand…I couldn’t even make myself call him by his name in this meta).

Isak had Even as “Even Kosegruppa” showing how he didn’t know his family name past. He didn’t know where he came from.
Even when he finally learned his last names, he still couldn’t find him on social media. He still only met him at kosegruppa. Even didn’t seem to exist before.
Isak was still missing an important information about him. And he still wasn’t sure about him and Even’s feelings for him. 
“Even Kosegruppa” is as neutral as you can get. It’s not just “Even” because that would be too sentimental. That would mean he’s the first Even his mind goes to when he thinks about the name Even. “Even Kosegruppa” is casual.

Which brings us to Sana.
Yousef is hiding his phone number.
Getting someone’s number feels much more personal than getting someone’s Facebook. It’s a next step in a relationship. First we add each other on Facebook. Then we get each other’s phone numbers…and then we date (because, lbh, we’ll never share our tumblrs to each other).
She’s only been chatting casually with him, through his social media. His social appearance. This public image she had of him. The assumptions she made based on appearances.
The real Yousef is still unknown. We got a glimpse of him at the end of episode 4 but that was still only breaking the surface. She likes him. A lot. But she’s conflicted.
She liked him so much without even realising he didn’t believe in Allah. Which seems like a big part of someone’s identity. It’s certainly a big part of Sana’s.

So yeah.
Unknown.

[The original meta assumed that Sana didn’t have Yousef’s phone number and that it was why it was displayed as “unknown”. I made most of my conclusion around this misconception. Since then a lot of people have explained to me that a number shows as “unknown” if it’s been made private/hidden by the caller. Which only made my point better: we went from Yousef being “unknown/unsure” a character to Yousef outright hiding shit. So I edited the Sana/Yousef part of this meta quickly to reflect this updated information.]

E3 2017 - Nintendo
  • Arms Trailer
  • Rocket League Trailer
  • Pokken TOurnament
  • FIFA 18 Switch
  • Splatoon 2
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 2
    • New Story + Gameplay Trailer
    • Holiday 2017
  • Kirby
    • 4 Player Coop
    • Gameplay Trailer
    • 2018
  • CORE POKEMON ON SWITCH NEXT YEAR or later
    • AHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
  • Metroid Prime 4 (2018?)
    • AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
  • Yoshi
    • Gameplay Trailer
    • 2018
  • Fire Emblem Warriors
    • Fall 2017
    • Gameplay + Story Trailer
  • Switch Skyrim
    • Link Skin with Mastersword
  • Breath of the Wild DLC
    • The Master Trials DLC Expansion 1
    • New Armor/Masks
    • The Champions Ballad Expansion 2
    • Holiday 2017
  • Amiibo
    • Zora Goran Rido Gerudo 
    • Work with BotW
  • Splatoon Arms Poken E3 Contests
  • Mario + Rabbids
    • August 29 2017
  • Rocket League
    • Holiday 2017
    • Exclusive cars and balls
    • Cross Platform Play
    • Local wireless Multiplayer
  • Super Mario Odyssey
    • Link Between Worlds Gameplay
    • Rockets, Electricity, Dinosaurs, Sombrero, Tophat
    • You take over a dinosaur
    • 10 27 2017
Surprise - you get a bonus Hiveswap developer interview today!

Hello there Hiveswap and Homestuck fans, Ash here! Now, I know what you’re thinking: “What madness is this? Ash said there’d only be *one* Hiveswap development team interview per week going forward! And he said they would be on WEDNESDAYS! This isn’t a Wednesday!”

Right you are, and that’s exactly why surprises are so much fun! Now, last week I mentioned that the next interviewee would be our superstar UI designer and all-around graphics guy Tauhid. Our interview with him will still be going live this week on Thursday, so definitely look forward to that, but today we’ve got another talented team member in the hot seat: Tom Hunt, our lead programmer and the prime coding whiz in charge of things on the technical side of things! Take it away, Tom!

Introduce yourself to the fans! What is your specific role on the Hiveswap team?

Hi, I’m Tom. I make stuff in Unity, which is a cross-platform 3D game engine and editor that can make all kinds of things - including the very 2D game you’re here to read about! My company neocade and I are working freelance on Hiveswap, with me as the lead programmer. Mostly, I direct and coordinate the team of programmers and quality assurance (QA) testers that are putting this game together. Sometimes I also write code.

When and how did you get your start on the Hiveswap project?

Sometime late last year, I was looking for a gig. At the time, What Pumpkin Games was looking for an additional Unity programmer. A mutual business contact introduced us via email, and we went from there.

Tell us a little bit about your career background! How did you get your start in programming? Do you have any advice for others looking to enter this field?

I’ve been programming computers since I was a little kid. I got my first actual programming job about a month after graduating high school, and did that for a bit during breaks while I was in college. It wasn’t very exciting, had nothing to do with video games, and didn’t pay a whole lot, but it sure beat taping up boxes of hot dogs in a factory all day.

The only advice I can really give to someone looking to enter the video games field is to just start making video games. Game development tools are more readily available now than they’ve ever been.

Also make lots of friends, especially with people who can draw or write or anything. If you live near a city, there is probably at least one game dev meetup somewhere - go to those and meet people. Get over whatever shyness you have, because almost every game that ever gets made is the result of a lot of teamwork.

We’re making a video game, so of course the question must be asked: what’s your favorite game of all time?

I played the heck out of Super Metroid back in the day. There’s something about that game. I would do speedruns of it - so now, every time I go back and play it, it all just feels so fluid. There’s a fairly robust set of inputs mapped out in a way that makes sense to my fingers. The entire game itself is fairly tightly bounded - a complete playthrough can take less than 90 minutes - so in a way, this beautifully detailed, explorable world is also actually kind of respectful of my time (more so than, say, a game like Skyrim, which is almost always a multi-hour/day/week commitment).

What games are you playing currently (if any)?

To be perfectly honest, I have not been playing NEARLY enough video games lately. That being said, aside from Hiveswap, I am currently into little mobile action puzzlers that I can play on the bus. Super Hexagon and Desert Golf are great. Just tried Polyforge this morning, too; that was pretty fun.

A lot of my friends are playing Breath of the Wild. I really want to just go get a Switch and play that, but I’m afraid of that eating up my time like Skyrim did.

Are there any games that you currently use or have used as inspiration for your own programming work here on Hiveswap, or just in general?

Not really - I tend to look at each technical problem on its own merits. The creative side of things is all handled by the What Pumpkin folks. I don’t really get involved with that too much. I just work to make sure their vision is implemented, however that needs to be done.

Imagine you’ve been given an unlimited budget and time frame to make your dream game. Tell us (briefly!) about that game in terms of genre, style, platforms, etc. Is it an original game or a long-desired sequel to an existing game? Go crazy!

Given an unlimited budget and time to work on a “dream game,” I’d have to go with some kind of deeply-simulated, massively multiplayer VR thing.

What’s your workstation like?

As a programmer, I like my workstations to be fast, reliable, and quiet. I always max out the RAM on a new machine if I can, because disk thrashing is just annoying as all hell. I’ve been really digging M.2 drives lately. Also, having extra monitors is always nice.

Do you like to listen to any particular kinds of music while you work? If so, tell us about it!

Mostly instrumental electronic music. Sometimes I’ll throw on some classical. Video game soundtracks are usually a pretty good bet. I can’t listen to anything with spoken words in it, though - too distracting.

Do you have a personal message you’d like to relay to all the Homestuck and Hiveswap fans out there?

Thank you all for being so patient with this project!

Thank you, Tom! Well folks, I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s surprise bonus interview, and remember to check back on Thursday for yet another behind-the-scenes peek into Hiveswap’s development! As I teased last week, our very own Tauhid Bondia will be on hand to talk about his indispensable (my word, not his!) graphics and user interface design work on Hiveswap. See you then, everyone!

Autistic Hogwarts students
  • Autistic students who are best friends with their pets, owls, cats and frogs.
  • Autistic students who spend all their free time in the library.
  • Autistic students who know spells that can muffle the sounds around them. This could be really useful in the great hall and other crowded places.
  • Autistic students who made a deal with the elves in the kitchen that they get their favourite and sensory safe food and drinks every day.
  • Autistic students who know secret passages and the least popular stairs in Hogwarts to avoid crowds.
  • Autistic students who like to wear the school uniform because they always wear the same and they won’t have to decide what sensory friendly clothing they want to wear each morning.
  • Autistic students who like to communicate with the merpeople by sign language. The merpeople come to the big windows on the far side of the Slytherin common room if they are curious or want to talk.
  • Autistic students who stim by flying on a broom or play quidditch in the heavy equipment.
  • Autistic students who buy their stim toys in a magical fidget shop: Potions which smell like everything you want them to. Blankets that adjust their weight to the needs of the owner. Stim toys which change textures and other things like self-rotating glitter jars, endless bubble wrap, moving pictures for visual stimming. Everything you’d ever imagine.
  • Autistic students who create their own ‘personal space’ inside their wardrobe with an extension charm to relax, recover and be alone.
  •  Autistic students who use the time-turner to visit their favorite classes, again and again.
  • Autistic students who are befriended with the ghosts and portraits because they need no physical contact and have hundreds of years of knowledge to share.
  • Autistic students who have a self-writing quill which makes notes in class.
  • Autistic students who have a magical bracelet or pin which displays the mood and show if they want to communicate or be left alone.
  • Autistic students who have a collection of magical stim toys which can fly, hover, change colours or textures or make sounds.
  • Autistic students who sneak out of their common room at night because they like to wander the empty and quiet halls.
  • Autistic students who invented a light that only shine for them if they want to read and learn all night without waking everyone.
  • Autistic students who made howler which can only be heard by the receiver because they are bothered by the sudden noise every time someone received one.
  • Autistic students who are allowed to visit the greenhouse, potion class, astronomy tower, stables for magical creatures or the quidditch fields if they want to experiment or learn about their special interest.
  • Autistic students who meet other autistics in the room of requirements to train or analyse social situations, talk about their special interests, stimming together, etc.
  • Autistic students who have self-organizing and magically expanding shelves.
  • Autistic students who have an arrangement with the house elves in the kitchen that always food and drinks appear near them when it’s time to eat and they forgot about it.
  • Autistic students who have blankets which can adjust their weight if they want their blankets to be heavier or lighter.
  • Autistic students who go nonverbal have magical cards which can display and verbalise their thoughts if they have to say something.
  • Autistic students who have a special interest in muggle things and interrogate all new muggle-born and half-blood students about it.
  • Autistic students who ‘lock’ their wands, so they can stim with it without setting of spells.
  • Autistic students who learn to cast their spells wandless because they don’t like the feeling of holding a wand or like to flap their hands.
  • Autistic students who are allowed to miss class if they (are about to ) have a meltdown, shutdown or a sensory overload.
  • Autistic students who have enchanted chairs and tables in every classroom which can adjust the brightness of the light, the speech volume of the teacher and other students and the room temperature to make the perfect environment for each student.
  •  Autistic students who have a magical compass which shows them the fastest way to their common room or safe place from every location in Hogwarts if they are going to have a meltdown, shutdown or sensory overload.
  • Autistic students who stay over Christmas in Hogwarts because it’s quieter and less stressful there than at their home.
  • Autistic students who are visited by their families and friends on visiting day at Hogwarts once a month. On every train station and in Kings Cross on platform 9 ¾  a wizard is positioned who cast a temporary spell on the visitors and lead them through the barrier. They will arrive at Hogsmeade where the students can meet them. In special cases, they can stay in Hogsmeade for a few days. After that, the Hogwarts Express will bring them back to the muggle world.
  • Autistic students who manipulate stinkbombs from Zonko’s Joke Shop or Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes that they smell like their favourite stimmy smell.
  • Autistic students who have a huge collection of chocolate frog cards or rare magical plants.
  • Autistic students who always have a sneakoscope on them, which make an alarming sound when it’s in range of an untrustworthy person, like a poltergeist or bullies. 
  • Autistic students who like to spend their time in the shrieking shack, when everything is too much and they need alone-time. It’s a lonely place because no others students dare to go there.To get there, they use the secret passage under the whomping willow.
  • Autistic students who like to spend their time at the boathouse because it’s quieter there than on the lakeshore.
  • Autistic students who row out onto the great lake to play with the merpeople and the giant squid and feed the squid toast from breakfast.
  • Autistic students who can’t travel in the crowded and noisy Hogwarts Express. Instead, they’re allowed to use brooms, portkeys, floo powder, apparition spells or flying cars or carpets.
  • Autistic students who can’t live in the common room could rent a room in Hogsmeade or stay home. They have to travel every day to Hogwarts and back home.
  • Autistic students who are allowed to travel with floo powder through the fireplaces from one classroom the next to avoid the crowds in the hallways.
  • Autistic students who like to flap and rock while reading about their special interests use flying books or let them fly.
  • Autistic students who like rules, order and organisation  want to be praefect of their house.
  • Autistic students who like the sound of the water in the Slytherin dungeon or the howling wind in the Gryffindor/Ravenclaw tower.
  • Autistic students who have a bad sense of orientation and take a copy of the marauders’s map from the Hogwarts merch shop with them to find the way to their classrooms.
  • Autistic students who visite besides muggle studies the social norm class for muggle and wizard worlds, in which muggle-born, half-bloods and pure-bloods learn about the social life and the daily life with or without magic in the other world.
  • Autistic students who have problems with personal hygiene. Instead of teeth brushing they can chew on a bubble gum made out of the juice of a rare magical plant. And instead of showering they can use potions or charms to stay clean.
  •  Autistic students who got stimming attachments from Olivander’s. They can modify their wands with chewing bits or little attached fidget toys or transparent parts with shiny liquid in it, like a glitter jar.
  • Autistic students who have magical contact lenses which can adjust the light level of every environment after the users needs.
  • Autistic students who teach themselves Parseltongue because they see it as a new challenge and a special way to make friends with animals
  • Send me your Ideas!
  • to be continued