crockermuseum

     At the close of the 90’s I was barely out of college and barely into my 20’s and I remember LACMA http://www.lacma.org/ launching it’s LACMA after dark series. It was amazingly posh and a young person like myself could expect to be treated with the same dignity afforded to a 27 year old. They didn’t even card me and when I ordered a Chardonnay and chugged with glee, dire consequences followed later, but who cares. The reason I was included was because at the time I worked at the Natural History Museum of Los Angles http://www.nhm.org/site/. As a database manager in the development department I was exposed daily to chatter about shrinking funding, additional revenue sources and ways to attract the young and upwardly mobile to the museums. As the 90’s drew their final prosperous breaths and the slow decline of the 2000’s set in, the Museums engaged their young patrons with booze, music and a place to mingle. 

     Fast forward to now and to Sacramento California. I was happy to find such a night of art and music at the Crocker Art Museum https://crockerartmuseum.org/, which occurs every second Thursday of the month. Music, art, booze and a little quirkiness.  Sacramento tends toward being a land the current century forgot, perpetually steeped in the 90’s.  The fact that the night at the Crocker had a 90’s vibe is no surprise. The venue though is first class, the old Victorian part of the museum connected as though through a time portal with the guggenheimesq new wing. Music by ZuhG. was festive and fun, full of energy, coaxing dancers off their seats.  One of the best treats was having the whole museum open, to peruse galleries and look through the shop after hours with drinks (so deviant!). The event was fun, although at least one of the aerial artists looked as though she would plummet to her death during the show, for the most part  the effort was solid. The glass and neon installations, were fun, but could have benefited from their own soundtrack, different more mellow and etherial music to go with the installations. 

     This visit to the Crocker brought back my pre-law school museum self. Quiet possibly the most fun I ever had working was when I worked at a Museum. I ended up purchasing a membership to the Crocker which was a good deal with the $10 entrance ticket deducted. Will see how this program proceeds and evolves during the year, looking forward to new art, new music and good booze (wine selection was weak, thank the lord for local beer!).