croatians!

some Croatian phrases and sayings, explained and translated to English by yours truly:

having a long tongue (imati dugi jezik) - refers to a person that can’t keep anything a secret and who will blab out whatever you tell them

to receive a little basket (dobiti košaricu) - to be dumped

you weren’t born on a boat (nisi se rodio na brodu) - this is said to people who don’t close the door after entering a room

a thunder won’t strike into stinging nettles (neće grom u koprive) - something is unlikely to happen

thirteenth pig (trinaesto prase) & fifth wheel (peti kotač) - unwanted, unneeded person, same as fifth wheel in English 

to hold a candle (držati svijeću) - to be a third wheel to somebody

“Sunday 5pm everybody come to the Bijeli Brijeg (stadium) Zrinjski needs you”


Luka Modric supporting the current champion of Bosnia and Herzegovina - Zrinjski Mostar - who is defending the title tomorrow in the last match of the season. The Croatian midfielder played one season at Zrinjski back in 2003/04, while on a loan from Dinamo Zagreb.

My “best friend” told me she would borrow me her book that we need to read for our croatian class after she was done reading it. She had 4 fucking days to read 30 pages so that I could read it. She didn’t read those 30 pages and when I asked her why she made a dumbass excuse. I got over it and read it online. I also asked her to go to the beach with me this saturday and she said she has to study but I saw her snapchat and she went to the beach with a girl who back stabbed her a million times. And who was there to comfort her all those times? Beep beep it’s me. She does these types of bullshit to me even tho I’m the only friend she has that stood by her. I put up with her bs for 2 years now and I decided to just let her go, I may not be perfect but I damn don’t deserve this

- Submitted by @sappydreampie


There’s nothing more satisfying than seeing other people cutting toxic people out of their lives I’m proud of you

anonymous asked:

Wait what languages do u speak

fluently slovenian english and german and i understand croatian serbian and other slavic languages but i cant rlly speak them that well, im also taking spanish next year !!

you know when you’re born in a non-english speaking country bilingualism is kind of a default. we are taught english from a young age so when someone asks me what languages do i speak, i respond with “well croatian and english obv, but im studying french and russian too”. and that bothers me. because english is fucking hard. in my country bilingualism is default, trilingualism is expected, and people get impressed when you speak five fucking languages where as native english speakers are praised for learning one (1) foreign language. i get that english is a major global language and why it is taught, but it bothers me that even if i spoke 5 languages fluently it would be useless if i didnt speak perfect english. and along with that, all of my hard work that i put into my english is dismissed because english is expected of me.
rant over.

Longest words

These are some of the supposed longest words in different European languages:

Irish - “rianghrafadóireachta” - photography

French - “Anticonstitutionnellement” - unconstitutionally

Croatian - “Prijestolonasljednikovica” - wife of an heir to the throne

Greek - “ηλεκτροεγκεφαλογραφήματος” - of an electroencephalogram

Latvian - “Pretpulksteņrādītājvirziens” - counter-clockwise

English - “Antidisestablishmentarianism” - against the disestablishment of the Church of England

Swedish - “Realisationsvinstbeskattning” - capital gains tax

Czech - “Nejneobhospodařovávatelnějšímu” - to the least cultivable ones

Polish - “Konstantynopolitańczykowianeczka the daughter of a man from Constantinople

Norwegian - “Menneskerettighetsorganisasjonene” - the human rights organisations 

Lithuanian - “Nebeprisikiškiakopūsteliaujantiesiems” - people who no longer are able to pick up wood sorrels.

Ukranian - “Нікотинамідаденіндинуклеотидфосфат” - nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

Serbian - “Семпаравиливичинаверсаламилитипиковски” - (this is actually the last name of a family from Yugoslavia)

Portuguese - “Pneumoultramicroscopicossilicovulcanoconiotico” - a disease caused by breathing in the dust from a volcano

Welsh - “Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch” - St Mary’s Church in the Hollow of the White Hazel near a Rapid Whirlpool and the Church of St. Tysilio near the Red Cave

Agglutinative languages. Things get even weirder here:

Estonian - “Sünnipäevanädalalõpupeopärastlõunaväsimus” - the tiredness one feels on the afternoon of the weekend birthday party

Dutch - “Hottentottententententoonstellingsterrein” - exhibition ground for Hottentot huts

Hungarian - “Eltöredezettségmentesítőtleníttethetetlenségtelenítőtlenkedhetnétek” - (apparently untranslatable) 

Finnish - “Lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas” - (something to do with the Finnish Air Force. Hard to translate but impressively long)

Icelandic - “Vaðlaheiðarvegavinnuverkfærageymsluskúraútidyralyklakippuhringur” - key ring of the key chain of the outer door to the storage tool shed of the road workers on the Vaðlaheiði plateau (Icelandic isn’t even really an agglutinative language which makes this even more impressive)

Turkish - “Muvaffakiyetsizleştiricileştiriveremeyebileceklerimizdenmişsinizcesine” - as though you are from those we may not be able to easily make a number of unsuccessful ones 

And then the longest word is, of course, German. It’s 79 letters long and almost impossible to use in context: 

German - “Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerk-bauunterbeamten­gesellschaft” - Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services. 


If you know any more impressively long words that I missed, please let me know so I can add them! 

Since I’m a huge fan of both Disney and languages I thought that this sort of list is not only fun but also quite helpful and might be useful while learning :)

Cantonese

Croatian

Danish

Dutch

English (Auli'i Cravalho/Alessia Cara)

Finnish

French

German

Greek

Hebrew

Hungarian

Icelandic

Indonesian

Italian

Japanese

Korean

Malay

Mandarin (Mainland/Taiwan)

Norwegian

Polish

Portugese (Brazilian/Portugese)

Russian

Serbian

Spanish (Castillan/Latin)

Swedish

Thai

Vietnamese

Bonus: 24 languages version  that actually inspired me to make this post

Just a few things most americans miss right now

A very creepy head behind ukraine’s singer

A very black horse that is very hot underneath

a supercute australian showing us his face since he knows what he does to us

the best host eurovision has ever had (from last year )

a croatian with 2 personalities


live yodel

a naked ape on stage

the sexual tension between the greek dancers

Jk rowlings comments


Defenitely something you should be watching @thatsthat24

theres more just you wait

If you take the Czech phrase “I love you” - “miluji tě” and put it in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, but slightly change it to “milujem te”, and translate it to English you will get “I caress you”. 

And if you take the Slovene phrase “I love you” - ”ljubim te” and put it in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian and translate it to English you will get “I kiss you”.

HOW TO IDENTIFY A SLAVIC LANGUAGE AT A GLANCE?

■ Broadly speaking, Slavic languages can be divided into those using the Cyrillic alphabet and those using the Latin alphabet, but in truth each language has developed its own modified alphabet. These language-specific letters and diacritic signs can serve as surefire clues, but unfortunately the task is much harder with speech, since accents and dialects tend to confuse even the most skilled listeners.

So how do you tell Slavic languages apart?

The Cyrillic alphabet:

BELARUSIAN – ў

■ Belarusian is the only language which uses the letter ў. It sounds similar to an English ‘w’, and the Latin transcription is ‘ŭ’. It is most often encountered in word endings equivalent to the Russian -ov or –ev suffixes, e.g., last names like Быкаў (Bykaŭ) or Някляеў (Nyaklyayeŭ).

UKRAINIAN – ї and є

■ ıf you see an ï amidst Cyrillic letters, you’re most likely reading Ukrainian. This letter is pronounced /ji/, and should not be confused with ‘i’ (/i/), or with ‘й’ (/j/) and ‘и’ (/ɪ/), which all look and sound slightly different.

Ukrainian is also the only language with the letter є ‒ in Russian the corresponding ‘э’ character faces the other way…

BULGARIAN – ъ

■ Ъ is a solid hint that you’re looking at Bulgarian ‒ it even pops up in the name of the country: България.  Though this letter (called ‘yer golyam’/‘ер голям’) also appears in Russian and other Slavic languages, it is not used frequently, whereas it appears regularly in Bulgarian. This is perhaps because it is silent in other Slavic languages, but in Bulgarian it symbolises a schwa sound (like the ‘u’ in ‘turn’). Make sure you don’t confuse it with the soft sign, ‘ь’.

Additional hint: ата is a frequent grammatical ending in Bulgarian.

SERBIAN – ђ and ћ

■ The similar ђ (dzhe) and ћ (tshe) are evidence you’re dealing with Serbian. Serbian Cyrillic doesn’t have many of the letters used in Russian Cyrillic; forget about ‘ё’, ‘й’, ‘щ’, ‘ъ’, ‘ы’, ‘ь’, ‘э’, ‘ю’, and ‘я’. If you want to tell Serbian apart from Russian, you can also look for љ (ly’) њ (ny’) and џ (dʒ), but these are also present in Macedonian.  

MACEDONIAN – Ѓ and Ќ  

■ Macedonian is the only language with the letters Ѓ and Ќ. The little accents over these Cyrillic letters are a surefire way to tell Macedonian apart from Serbian. The letters stand for sounds similar to the English [dʒ] and [t͡ʃ] – the latter sounding really Chinese.

Additionally, Macedonian features the letter ‘s’ [d͡z], which otherwise does not occur in the Cyrillic alphabet.

RUSSIAN

■ Famous for its inverted letters, Russian is probably the most recognizable Slavic language out there. On the other hand it is quite easy to confuse it with Ukrainian, Bulgarian or Serbian, so if you have a full sentence on your hands, it’s best to proceed by elimination using all the tips mentioned above.

The Latin alphabet:

POLISH – ł

■ If you see the letter ł with the characteristic slash through it, you’re looking at Polish. Ą and ę (which are nasal consonants) are also giveaways but be careful, both letters are also in the Lithuanian alphabet (which is not a Slavic language). Digraphs like ‘sz’, ‘cz’, and ‘dz’, sometimes combined into consonant clusters like ‘prz’, ‘trz’, and ‘szcz’, are clues, but watch out for Hungarian, which has similar consonant clusters.

SLOVAK – ä

■ Slovak is the only Slavic language to use ä, or ‘a s dvoma bodkami’ as the Slovaks call it. It comes up in words like ‘mäso’, ‘sôvä’, ‘rýbä’ (meat, owl, fish) and is pronounced like the English ‘a’ sound in ‘bad’. The same goes for ŕ, which is not used in any other Slavic language.

CZECH – ů

■ The Czech and Slovak alphabets are really similar. To tell them apart, look for the tiny difference in the diacritic sign over the letter r – where Slovak uses ‘ŕ’, the Czech letter has a tiny hook: ř. Also, if you see the letter ů, it’s Czech.

CROATIAN – đ

■ Written Croatian can appear hardly discernible from Slovenian, Czech or Slovak, with which it shares the letters as ‘č’, ‘š’, and ‘ž’, it has an easy distinctive feature ‒ the so-called crossed đ. [dʑ]

BOSNIAN

■ The Bosnian alphabet is indistinguishable from Croatian. To identify the language you would have to dig much deeper and look for differences in vocabulary since Bosnian has some unique words, mostly of Persian and Arabic origin.

SLOVENIAN

■ Slovenian, which is the westernmost Slavic language, is also the most discrete in terms of alphabet. In fact, it has only three special characters, ‘č’, ‘š’, and ‘ž’, which also appear in Czech, Slovak and Croatian. Again, your best bet is to proceed by elimination. (culture.pl)