K, y'all need to help me out or I’m gonna cry of confusion! I keep getting people saying that this looks terrible and I should draw any more(I know to ignore the stop drawing part) but there’s also people saying that this looks good! I’ve been fortunate enough to receive useful criticism on this, but Idk, maybe were all missing something. Give me the most honest critique you can! Get very in-depth if you can, please.

I wouldn’t say it’s terrible, it’s a decent piece. And I’ll try to be as in depth as possible \;v;/

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Pasta Emoji Ratings

A classic, nice simple sauce, would eat this no problem. Probably tastes pure and the kids would love it. 7/10

Fun, simple, but dangerously close to Mac n Cheese with that level of orange saturation. They would probably steal your labeled food from the fridge, simply shameful. Not sure what the purple spots are either, not sure if i’d eat this one. 5/10


Shameful, it appears to be a few noodles left on a plate, what a waste. Would not eat someone’s leftovers. 0/10

Elegant, simple, modern. Reminiscent of a pizza, which is a fresh new way to approach the subject. The stray noodle is a little worrying, but for the most part they’re a hardworking, well put together pasta. Would hang this up in my modern art gallery. 8/10

Not sure how to feel about this one. While the sauce is one of the best renditions I’ve seen, beautiful detail, the rest of the dish is lacking. The leaves look dangerous, like those delinquents that try to roll with the pure kids, but we’re onto them. I love the symmetry of the three noodles rising from the sauce, would eat them for sure. Not so sure about the rest. 6/10

Fake. This obviously canned pasta is trying to play itself off as genuine, unforgivable. While the taste is probably fine, a pasta you’d let your daughter hang out with, it doesn’t excuse the fact that it’s a filthy liar. would not eat for fear of my health. 2/10 

A very small noodle, good with young children, tries their best at all times. It has the perfect portion of sauce for such a tiny thing, and it deserves all it can get. I would eat this, but gently, as not to intimidate it. 9/10

Magnificent! Tasty! A real winner of a dish! The attention to detail and shading simply astonishes me. This dish is to die for, and the kind you’d bring home to your mother. Simply lovely, would definitely eat. 10/10

This is just abhorrent, not tasty at all. The choice of thick white noodles surrounded by a yellow liquid, while an interesting take, is incredibly inaccurate and tasteless. Would not eat, especially with that trident thing. 1/10

flavourless, an absolute bore of a dish. White I appreciate the detail of the cell shaded noodles, they lack charisma and courage. Would be a true pure friend, someone you can rely on, but very easily manipulated and a momma’s boy. Need’s more saturation if it want’s to roll with the big boys. 4/10. 

I feel like this is a failed attempt at what HTC excelled at. The abstract look they’re going for just doesn’t execute well at all. And that black border feel’s very threatening and hostile, as if I’m not allowed to eat it. The kind of pasta who has problems with it’s masculinity. Probably wouldn’t eat. 3/10

Why the fuck is there chocolate syrup on my pasta. 0/10

When people criticize Hannigram as a toxic ship I’m just like…have you ever read literature? Have you ever looked at art? Have you ever watched film? Art isn’t always supposed to be nice, pretty, and wrap things up in perfect little bows of how ideal life and relationships should be. Art can be complicated, raise moral questions, show the dark side of humanity and love.

I feel like there is this general misunderstanding with like 18 year old kids on this website of how to engage with complex art and representation. Critique and analysis are essential. But I don’t understand this imposition that creative works be positive, healthy, and safe. Like that’s not how art works??

Hey, all!  Amy here and feel free to skip this, but I noticed a huge thing going around with fanfiction writers and fanfiction readers. Kinda throwing arrows at one another over mistakes and how they should be addressed.

Okay, first off: stop.  Ew.  It’s gross. Y’all are big boys and girls and y’all can act like it.  You don’t need to attack each other at the knees behind the safety of your screens.

Secondly:  there are points on both sides.  People who write have a right to be proud of their work and can choose not to accept criticism.  On the other hand, people who read and absorb the work have the right as well to point out mistakes they noticed if it’s meant to be helpful.

So how can people interact civilly when it comes to fanfiction and it’s accompanying critiques? By following a few internet rules, plain and simple.  No, I’m not gonna tell you to forgive and forget or just roll over and let the other person have their way.  That’s not what you do IRL and that’s not what you do online either.  Instead, both persons have a series of rules to follow in order to try and make the most of their experience.

Originally posted by m-blunicorn

FOR THE WRITERS:

I start with you because you’re the ones who have poured your heart and soul into this baby. And I get it, I do.  When you spend hours and hours slaving over your baby, going over the idea thousands of times in your head, trying to get the idea on paper, and trying to make it look good, then oh heck to the yes it’s your baby and you’re gonna defend it to the death.  I expect that and that’s okay.  What’s not okay is when it interferes with your ability to check in with the situation and see if they actually meant harm, so here are a few rules I’ve started to use over my years of fanfiction writing:

  1. Read the entire comment for content.  This is a bitter pill to take, especially if they sound condescending or snarky.  I’ve run into a few of them, and they’re never pleasant to deal with, but some of them have good ideas.  Try to filter out the junk of the comment and get to the meat of it all.  (I’ll get to what to do if there’s no meat later)
  2. Take a break from the comment when you get angry. And chances are that if it’s an unsolicited comment, you’re going to get angry.  This is your baby and you’ve worked hard on it.  If the crtiquer isn’t at least taking that into account, you may even get furious.  Get up and walk away.  They do not deserve your wrath.
  3. Decide for yourself if they have a point. Most critiquers tend to leave their comments because they’re trying to help in their own (somewhat obnoxious) way. If they’ve got a point, thank them, but also try to express if the critique was delivered well.  If it was, tell them so they can help more people. If not, tell them so they can work on it.  IF THEY DO NOT HAVE ANY POINT AT ALL AND ARE JUST BEING RUDE, get rid of it.  They’re not worth your time.
  4. Respond or toss.  This is up to you.  If they had content that was actually useful, then they were being helpful like they were trying to be.  If they had content and it wasn’t useful, it’s up to you what to do.  If they had zero content in their critique or it wasn’t relevant at all, skip it.  They’re not worth your time.

I actually formed these rules after an encounter with a critiquer who was completely neutral in tone, blurted my mistakes for the world to see, and essentially made me feel like the absolute worst writer in the world.  They weren’t harsh, but their critique did hurt me, especially because I’d still just been starting out.

The first thing that happened was I got angry.  I was livid, furious.  Like, how dare they?  Couldn’t they just sit back and enjoy the story?  I spent a good week or so avoiding my fanfiction account just because I was so pissed off.  I ended up talking to my mom and she asked me if they had any points.  I think she was going for “if they don’t, then they’re not worth your time”, but they did. After that, I went back and tried to see it from their point of view.

Originally posted by geekylaugifs

Didn’t mean I suddenly wasn’t mad at them.  I was mad, but I also realized that they, in their own roundabout and hurtful (to me, who reads inflection into typed words and winces at every loud noise and criticism) way, were trying to help me.

I worked on it, and I don’t think they ever commented on my stuff again, but the people who already loved my stuff?  The people who said that my stuff was ‘cute’ or ‘genius’?  They loved it all the more!  The critiquer may not have stuck around, but those who did benefited.

(It really took me a long time to stop being angry at them.  Now I just kind of take a lesson from them.  As a fanfiction writer, and as a critiquer myself.)

Originally posted by trendinggifs

FOR THE CRITIQUER:

I’m saying this as someone who has pretty high standards for what I read.  I look into formatting, tenses, plot, characterization, spelling, and even comma usage!  These little things do actually bug me, and sometimes enough to the point of wanting to comment, but I’ve been on the other side of it and remember the frustration and the anger that can come from a wrongly worded comment, so there are a few rules that I’ve formulated in order to be the best critiquer I can be and help as many people as possible get as amazing as they can as a writer!

Note:  These rules are for critiquers who actually do want to help writers get better and improve the overall quality of internet written works. If you’re here because of some superiority complex, these rules may be difficult for you to follow.  I, however, encourage you to do your best and perhaps one day you’ll be a good critiquer.  *^_^*

  1. Find a way to figure out if the author even wants your critique.  One way to do this is to respectfully ask them.  Always open with a positive.  Something like “Hey, I liked ___ about your story, but I noticed something was a bit off. Can I give you a constructive critique?” Typically, an author would be happy to know you cared about their opinion, so this will go either one of two ways.  They will either (A) allow the critique and actually listen to what you have to say or (B) politely decline the offer.  This means they have made up their mind and you are to let it go.  The back button is a wonderful friend at this point.
  2. Follow the sandwich format.  This is a tried and true method for getting people to actually listen.  If you start in with the critique, the author will feel attacked and immediately get defensive.  Instead of wondering if you’ve got any point, they will find ways to contradict you and argue.  Instead, open with something you liked about the story.  There was a reason you read it all to the end, wasn’t there?  Mention that first (AND BE HONEST!  NO ONE LIKES SOMEONE WHO GIVES OUT FALSE COMPLIMENTS), and then get to the critique, or ‘meat’, of your critique.  When that’s done, exit with a thank-you for being willing to listen to your comments.  It takes a lot for a creator to listen to someone point out the flaws in their baby, even if they’re trying to learn.  Remember that you want this to be a positive interaction, not a demolition derby.
  3. No insults or other derogatory comments. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, the writer is trying their best.  Insulting them makes them less willing to hear you out, much less accept your comments and get better.
  4. No elevating yourself over them.  It’s a no-brainer.  You’re not there to school them, you’re there to help them.  Helping requires a serving mind, which puts their needs before your ego.
  5. Do not hound the author.  If they listen but don’t take your comments, you’re not allowed to harass them.  Most likely, they don’t see a point in your comment and have elected to ignore it. And that’s fine.  The point is that you managed to bring it to their attention once.  Maybe they’ll come back to it later, maybe not.  Either way, once your critique is given, it’s done.  Unless they come to you asking about it, your job is to pack up and vamoose, or simply to sit back and enjoy watching the rest of the story unfold.
  6. Make sure your comments are objective.  Like, if there’s a comma problem, tell them about it. If there’s verb tenses being messed up, inform them politely.  If person A didn’t get with person B, then you’re not critiquing.  That’s a matter of opinion and doesn’t belong in the critiquing category.
  7. Be respectful.  They’re going on a limb and listening to you, and it’s the author’s choice whether or not to continue the correspondence. You don’t have to ‘kiss up to them’ or ‘serve them’, but you have to make sure you’re not being a jerk and that all your comments are warranted.

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

I know there are a lot of rules, but critiquing is hard, especially with how a lot of people view them.  But you, the critiquer, ARE NOT EVIL.  You’re not the bad guy.  You’re not messed up.  You’re not ‘sticking your nose where it doesn’t belong’.  You’re human and you’re trying to be helpful.  These are just tips and tricks on how to go about it the right way and maximize your helpfulness.

Originally posted by hippie-janessa

FOR EVERYONE!!

The last thing I’ll say is that not everyone will follow these rules.  They will think they’re stupid or pandering or all-around dumb. Some people who claim to critique will continue to slander our good name by acting like holier-than-thou snits. Some people who write will continue to get outrageously angry for persons daring to say something went wrong.

Originally posted by blisteredblue

Here’s how to deal with them:

  1. Leave the computer.  Or the website, just for a bit.  Enjoy the sunshine, take a walk, talk with your best friend, eat some ice cream, go play.  See if it just blows over.  They don’t get to take away your happiness because they’re angry.
  2. Delete the hate.  When you’re good and happy, you can delete the hate mail, or maybe grab a friend to laugh at it.  But don’t respond to hate with anger.  As my good friend Warlord Okeer said, you shall inflict “the greatest insult an enemy can suffer. To be ignored.”
  3. If they chase you down in anger, block them. This is okay to do.  For fanfiction writers:  if they continue to pester you with their comments after you say ‘no thanks’, block their tails.  For fanfiction critiquers:  if they got angry over a critique you gave, provided that they said okay and provided that you followed the rules of critiquing, you’re allowed to block them. You did it right.  Don’t even stress.

And then there are the times where we forget to follow the rules and insult someone on accident. It happens.  If you realize you’re in the wrong, it’s just one rule.

  1. Apologize.  No, you don’t have to grovel for forgiveness, but understand that your actions may have hurt someone else and react accordingly.  If they won’t take it, at least make the promise to yourself to be better in the future.

And that’s it.  I know it seems like a lot to swallow, but it all boils down to making sure your words are respectful, kind, and true.

Originally posted by fandomdeluxe

Tl;dr:  MAKE SURE YOUR WORDS ARE RESPECTFUL, KIND, AND TRUE!!

anonymous asked:

I just keep thinking about the bay or bae choice but like in the context of the choice the beast gives Wirt at the end of over the garden wall. Like the tornado asking to choose between chloe and Arcadia bay and Max just responding with, "that's dumb" and choosing something else that saves everyone lmao

Haha, I’ve never drawn that comparison but that’s amusing. OTGW is one of my favorite stories in general at this point, though. Thinking on all of this led to an informal essay that helps me ground myself in my own mistakes with other fics I’ve worked on, All Wounds’ planning stages, and how I’m approaching its impending ending.

This one’s a bit of a doozie.

(I will be referencing elements of the endings to Over the Garden Wall, Life is Strange, Steins;Gate, and Oxenfree, in case you’re worried about knowing things you don’t yet want to know)

OTGW and LIS are very different stories dealing with very different themes, and OTGW can get away with a blunt and brusque resolution like that because it’s a dark comedy that’s in many ways subverting or teasing a lot of melodramatic tropes. LIS often introduces tropes and then peels back a layer and asks us to look deeper, which is a whole other sort of deal.

The problem, though, is that its own finale and final climax kind of doesn’t hold up, because it hinges upon a choice that really makes no sense – and a moral-oriented choice, at that, which makes it even harder to swallow.

With Wirt and the Beast, there’s a physical character within the world to confront. To call out. To vanquish or scare off or outsmart. Greg’s disposition can be broken apart and he can be released. The entire story is about mystery and, well

OTGW makes no allusions that its story isn’t supposed to quite make sense, it embraces its mystery, and it subverts things by making ‘reality’ a hidden element until the final act.

The story makes it pretty obvious that this world isn’t supposed to make much sense, too, which leads us to not really question things when it doesn’t.

Wirt is the elder brother, he’s supposed to set an example, he’s supposed to look out for his sibling, and he fails.

And while there’s a lot of darkness to this story, it is, ultimately, a comedy, first and foremost, and most resolutions with the various antagonists are resolved with some kind of clever or amusing tactic. It doesn’t want us to take it too seriously, and it’s often making fun of tropes in dramatic fantasy stories.

What’s happening with Max, Chloe, and the tornado isn’t so physical as being lost, as confronting magical beasts. It’s abstract and unexplained, yet the story wants us to take it seriously and tries (weakly) to ‘explain’ things. This falls short because there aren’t really any concrete, established rules, and yet we’re supposed to buy into everything being Max’s fault when we don’t even know how it’s her fault. This is tricky because within the context of the narrative, it makes the player assume the position and perspective the creators wanted:

Max Caulfield is supposed to choose between the greater good, or what she desires as an individual.

The premise of that choice is great, and it’s what the entire game has been foreshadowing and leading up to. The execution is just very iffy to me because of the dodgy attempt at explanation…without explaining anything. ‘Chaos Theory’ literally does not work the way the game alludes to it. The writers know none of this makes sense, which is why in the finale they unfortunately go as bluntly as to make Chloe say:

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We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn’t, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell’s dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley’s vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions.” In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.

The relationship between misogyny and romance: a SJM study

Why female desire* isn’t problematic, but A Court of Thorns and Roses is.

In which I wade into an issue in depth, praying that the flame war gods do not strike me down.

**Please note that this essay discusses only the misogynist elements of SJM’s writing in the ACOTAR series. There are obviously other problematic elements that require acknowledgement, but this is the one I feel confident in addressing. I haven’t read any of ACOWAR yet.** 

*also, female desire in this instance refers to the desire of the presumed female reader of romance. The reading of romance and YA is obviously not exclusive to women, although a lot of the assumptions of SJM’s work ascribe to the concept of a binary gender.

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Life is Strange Episode 1: Chrysalis In-Depth Review

(Disclaimer: This review is from the point of view of someone who views the relationship between Max and Chloe as a blossoming romantic one. I believe that relationship to be the most major plot point of the entire 5 episode series, and I will treat it as such.)


From the very beginning, we can tell there’s more to this game than meets the eye. The very first scene of the episode shows Max encountering a giant tornado rushing toward the town of Arcadia Bay. There’s something to be said about the opening because of how insane the game begins, we know we’re in for a ride from the very start. A giant tornado hurdling toward a town in a blistering storm? You’re drawn into the mystery as much as Max is, as she questions what is happening exactly. She gets to the lighthouse and she is immediately thrust back into reality.

Max Caulfield is an 18 year old student and photographer at the prestigious art school, Blackwell Academy, in Arcadia Bay, Oregon. Because what LGBT game doesn’t take place in the Pacific Northwest these days? We’re quickly introduced to several of the other major recurring characters in the game in this scene. We meet the bitchy bully, Victoria Chase. Rich and beautiful, Victoria has a major disdain for Max from the very beginning. There’s also Max’s friend, Kate Marsh, a quiet religious girl who is the target of Victoria’s bullying. Kate just wants to be left alone, but she isn’t given that much. Finally in this scene there’s Mark Jefferson, a famous photographer who is teaching photography at Blackwell. One of the storylines, the Everyday Heroes Contest, is introduced here as a contest that Jefferson continuously attempts to get Max to enter, but she usually blows it off. The scene ends and we’re introduced to Max’s inner thoughts about everyone else that plays somewhat of a role.

Before going any further, let me just say, this game’s score and soundtrack is amazing. Every song in the soundtrack fits in with Max’s “hipster-ish” attitude that she has. I’m not much of a critic of music, so let’s move on.

From the very beginning, we’re thrust into Max’s head. Everything Max thinks, we hear as typical of this sort of game, but this time it’s a much broader picture. Max has an opinion about everyone, from Victoria’s lackeys to Dana, one of the few popular people who isn’t an ass to Max. Max has her opinions and they’re very much in line with a normal person’s thoughts. She certainly has a lot of negatives about people, mostly because she herself is more quiet than the average person. It gives good insight into how Max thinks, both about others and herself. “I shouldn’t be so catty, Dana is nice to me.” Max doesn’t think too much of herself, and in her mind she attempts to put down others to help make herself feel better. She doesn’t do this to their face, nor behind their backs, it’s simply within her head. She likes Dana, but Dana at the same time is the outgoing soul Max wishes she could be, but it simply isn’t in Max to do be that type of person.

The walls are also littered with missing posters of a girl named Rachel Amber, a major character in this game’s overall story. Max is surprised at the sheer amount of posters there actually are.

The bathroom scene gives another insight into Max’s self-loathing qualities. First off, she goes in there so she can be alone and have her “melt down” without anyone seeing. She rips the image she was going enter into the contest. This doesn’t bother her though, because the minute she sees that blue butterfly flutter in she goes to it. Fate draws her over to the corner to take a photo of that odd blue butterfly.

The first major point of the game comes in that bathroom. It’s probably the most important scene in the game. Local richboy, Nathan Prescott, comes into the girl’s bathroom and has a mini-meltdown before being confronted by a blue haired punk girl. The argument between them escalates until Nathan fires a bullet into the girl’s stomach. At this moment, Max comes out from behind the stalls and holds out her hand. Then, Max wakes up. She’s back in her classroom that she was in a few minutes prior.

The main mechanic of this game is the ability to rewind time. This type of game usually has action sequences in the form of quick time events, however Life is Strange dumps the QTEs in favor of the rewind feature. Max has the ability to rewind a few moments of her personal time to a previous point in order to change it in her favor. She accidentally breaks her camera? Rewind time. Then the camera is back to normal. It’s a pretty fun mechanic and it breaks up the monotony of similar games that have me slamming the buttons on my controller or keyboard.

Max goes through the entire scene again, this time utilizing her powers to have the outcome more favorable to herself. Victoria embarrassed Max in the original timeline, having answered something Max didn’t know. But in this case, because Victoria said the answer, Max uses her answer to get on Jefferson’s good side so she can hopefully save blue-haired girl from being shot. 

This begins Max’s crusade of her powers. These powers allow her temporary omniscience in some cases. She has full control over her own conversations and how to reply utilizing her powers. That’s probably one of them more interesting things about Life is Strange compared to other similar games like Telltale’s The Walking Dead.

In The Walking Dead, you have to make all of your choices at that moment. Anything and everything you say will be held against you depending on your timed answer. That’s what makes that game so great. Life is Strange takes a different approach, which helps to separate it from the others. Rather, you are not timed in your answer but rather how you answer and if you choose to change how you answer.

In a later scene, Max can speak to Brooke, another girl that she sorta knows. Brooke is flying a drone around campus, and Max doesn’t know much about that sort of thing. Brooke blows Max off as someone who isn’t that bright. Either A) Max can leave the scene or B) Rewind. She can take a look at the type of drone Brooke owns and then use that knowledge in a conversation Max has already had.

In story, Max uses this power to save the girl from being shot by Nathan. Probably a much more heroic use of her power as opposed to using it to saying the right things to other people. Of course to do this, she sets off a fire alarm. Like other games of the genre, there are certain choices that are more important than others. Max is confronted by the head of security and principal for not being outside right away. What if she was just using the bathroom and she wasn’t done yet? Great job guys, grilling some girl for using the bathroom and she didn’t get out in time from the fire alarm. 

Both David Madsen and Principal Welles play a part in the story, the former more so than the latter. David comes off as very unlikable and paranoid. Especially against an 18 year old photographer coming out of the bathroom. It takes Welles to get him out of her face, and Welles is sorta in my opinion a Skinner type character. He does his job and that’s it. You can hold that against him, sure, but he’s just doing his job in the end by asking what was wrong with Max. No matter how Max responds, it goes negatively for her in the end which makes him come off as a hardass. We can either choose to throw Nathan under a bus or not. For the sake of this review, we are throwing him under the bus.

Ugh. Let’s talk about Warren Graham, one of my least favorite characters in the game. He sends a text to Max, sending her on a quest to find his flash drive. Just from looking at his texts we see Warren has a… fixation with our heroine. He’s sent her several texts and Max has ignored most of them, until he’s like “Yo I need my flash drive back.” Max doesn’t seek him out, and only replies when he needs something that belongs to him. This becomes one of my issues, which I’ll talk about later. Warren it pretty flat as a character too. His character is basically “nice and dorky” and that’s about it.

We see how bitchy and petty Victoria really is. Because Max answered instead of Victoria in class, Victoria doesn’t let Max into the dorms. Kate makes a brief appearance sitting on a bench, but she says she isn’t in the mood to talk. Utilizing her time travel powers, Max manages to tamper with a paint can being used by Samuel, the grounds keeper, and soak Victoria in paint. For this moment you do see Victoria’s “actual” personality, which is really just being hidden by a facade she keeps up. Max can be a bitch back to her or be nice, and I usually choose the latter out of pure kindness. It shows that Max isn’t petty enough to sink down to the very level that Victoria usually sits at on Max.

Max’s room screams her, it really does. From the personality we’ve been given, her room really fits that character. From the “definitely not Catcher in the Rye” poster to her meme rug to her plentiful books on photographers, you can see that this is Max’s domain. She walks out of the shitty outside world into a world that is her own. There’s her guitar, her bed, her music, her books, her laptop, her wall of photos, etc. Basically everything that makes Max comfortable. When she lays down on her bed, she is at peace. She doesn’t have to deal with any of the bullshit that she deals with.

Observing her room, we can look at photos from her past. From her original life in Arcadia Bay to her life in Seattle. We get our first glimpse of Chloe Price, Max’s best friend from her life five years ago. Max, guiltily, admits that she has yet to contact her.

The next scene, again, really is just a play at how awful Victoria is. This time she’s messing with Dana, whom I mentioned earlier, and Dana’s best friend, Juliet. A lot of this seems to show how insecure Victoria actually is, and how she’ll target pretty much anyone she decides to put on her shit list. Juliet wrote a negative article about the Vortex Club, a group of party dogs that Victoria and Nathan run. So even though this article isn’t exclusively targeting Victoria, she is insulted enough to attack Juliet. Max manages to settle the feud between the two friends, and manages to grab the flash drive.

The flash drive presents one of the major reasons I dislike Warren. He is a creeper, simple as that. Some people don’t take him as that, I do because of obvious reasons. First off, the flash drive contains a folder labeled “MAX”. This folder was opened and seen by Dana, who tells Max about it. Warren doesn’t come off as the dorky friend with a one-sided crush. Most people don’t have a folder dedicated to just a “crush”. We see that Max just is kinda irked by it too. Depending on your actions (whether or not you interfere with Dana’s personal life), you will receive the following journal entry.

Max does not see Warren as anything more than a friend, which is why he constant attempts at shutting him down happen. And he doesn’t seem to get the memo, which makes him seem creepier when we get to a certain scene in Episode 2. And please note, that we haven’t even met the character yet, and we already know that Max does not have any romantic interest in him.

Anyways, Max gets the flash drive from Dana and we go to the next scene where we go to meet Warren in the parking lot. 

We are introduced to the first Kate choice in the game. The Kate Choices, as I call them, are a group of choices in the first two episodes that effect a major event later on in the game. These choices mostly deal with how Max reacts to how Kate is being treated by other people. Madsen is confront Kate over something, and unable to see this through any further Max can step out and defend Kate from Madsen. The player, and Max, are completely unsure of what just transpired, but Kate is thankful for Max stepping in. As passive as Max can be usually, she has a certain friendship with Kate that keeps her from being passive in that case.

We head over and when exploring the parking lot, we can look at a trashy pick up truck taking several spots up. The driver seems to be the one putting up the posters, since the back has several boxes full of them. Max can also draw on the dirty window of an RV, that becomes more significant later on.

We meet Warren, and he’s coming off as overly “touchy” the moment we meet him. “Hey Max, how are you?” Warren says, going in for a hug, which Max completely rejects because she’s there to give him back his flash drive and that’s it. There’s a certain lack of social awareness that Warren just doesn’t have, and that coupled with his fixation on Max makes him very uncomfortable to me. For the sake of this review, based on my last playthrough which is fresh in my mind for this, Max will not be pursuing much of a friendship with Warren. Most choices to Warren are negative.

We’re given a much more clear picture of the game’s major antagonist, Nathan Prescott. I don’t like Nathan. A lot of people see him as not an antagonist, which is something I don’t understand based on things that happen over the course of the game. Anyways, Nathan is not too happy that Max saw him in the bathroom earlier and immediately grabs her neck. Yes, that’s obviously something a well adjusted non-antagonistic character would do. 

If anything, Nathan makes for a very good antagonist. His motivations are unraveled throughout the game, so I won’t delve too much into it at the moment, but we can concretely place Nathan into the antagonist category with David at the present moment.

Max takes matters into her own hands and scratches Nathan’s face, showing Nathan who the boss is. He knocks Warren out onto the ground, and attempts to get up on Max’s grill, only for Max to be narrowly hit by the trashy pick up truck. 

Max’s old best friend, Chloe Price, is the driver of said trash truck. Despite not knowing what’s going on Chloe immediately tells Max to get in before driving off. This first interaction in five years immediately helps to set the bar for the oncoming relationship between Max and Chloe. There is no denying their bond, considering it takes only seconds for Chloe to tell Max to get in the car.

Chloe’s car and room pretty much set her personality up. Her personality is a wild storm, both messy and unpredictable as a result of the last five years. Chloe is hurt that Max has been around for a month and has yet to contact her. She is both happy and upset. Upset that Max hasn’t seen her yet, but is happy that Max is here now. Their conversation helps to delve into their sudden reconstruction of their old friendship. It’s been five years and they’re pretty much strangers. Max’s structured life has resulted in her being more quiet and sheltered, her only means of expressing herself being photography. Chloe’s unstructured life has resulted in her becoming a rebellious, drug taking party girl. Deep down though, they are still best friends.

Outside of optional photographs, Max usually only takes photos of things she deems great to be in her lens. She only sees her camera is broken after attempting to take this photo.

Max already considers a simple photo of Chloe in front of the sun as a photograph she wants to take. Taking a photograph of Chloe becomes a recurring element for the first four episodes. Chloe and Max briefly bond over Max’s usage of the word “cereal” instead of serious, and Chloe happily welcomes Max home. Because now Max is home. Arcadia Bay without Chloe isn’t home to Max. Only once Chloe is back in her life can she consider the Bay home.

We enter into Chloe’s home, a familiar but distant territory for Max now. Chloe remarks that her room is different from the last time Max has seen it. Again, a result of the issues regarding the incident of the death of Chloe’s father five years prior. Chloe, both emotionally and mentally, is broken and scarred by abandonment. The second they get back, Chloe needs to lay down and smoke a joint to calm herself down.

Her room is messy and disorganized. Small things, like her shelf, remain from her old life but everything here represents Chloe’s world as much as Max’s room does for her. In Chloe’s room, all her likes and fears are on display. Disorganized messes, disorganized lighting in the form of Christmas lights, etc. Her fears are on display too. A height chart in the corner shows how torn Chloe is in life. “DAD IS GONE” it reads on the height chart. “EVERYBODY LIES NO EXCEPTIONS” it says near her door.

Max’s nosiness allows her to find out that the missing girl, Rachel Amber, became Chloe’s close friend after Max moved to Seattle. However, she went missing several months prior. No one cares enough to find her or do anything except Chloe. Her dad said he’d come home, he didn’t. Max was supposed to be her best friend forever, she moved away. Rachel was supposed to escape the Bay with Chloe, Rachel disappeared without a word. “EVERYBODY LIES, NO EXCEPTIONS” becomes a very deep and personal motto to Chloe. Two of the closest people to her “lied” to her. Rachel couldn’t have possibly done a thing like that. Chloe refuses to believe such a thing, which is why she continues to put up posters months later.

In an attempt to fix her camera, Max can stalk downstairs and reminisce about better times with Chloe. Back then, those times were easier for Max and Chloe. They were best friends, and we see that those memories flood back into Max’s head just by sitting down on the couch or on the swing set. These mean something to Max. To Max these are the happiest times of her life compared to now. 

The garage gives us some more insight into David as well. David Madsen just happens to be Chloe’s new step dad, go-figure. The Blackwell Head of Security is stepdad to hell-raiser Chloe. Despite the fact that she’s only supposed to get tools from the garage, Max snoops around and we can see that David is very paranoid. About pretty much everything. He has cameras set up around the house and has a file on Kate Marsh, photos and notes about the religious girl. David, even though he’s only been in two unrelated scenes so far, we can that his paranoia exceeds that of a normal person. While is time in the Middle East may play a part, one must wonder where he truly stands.

Chloe is truly happy for Max to be back in her life. After several months of what we can assume is probably lack of a true friend, Chloe is more than happy to see Max here. Max fails to fix her camera, but Chloe takes notices of the blue butterfly photo. She recognizes the butterfly and puts two and two together to recognize that Max is the one who saved her earlier in the game.

This immediate connection helps to set that Chloe isn’t dumb. On the contrary, Chloe is probably the smarter of the two girls. Her lack of application of her schoolwork results in her eventual expulsion from Blackwell. She doesn’t care enough, but the smarts are there. That’s something we’ll explore more in Episodes 3 and 4 though.

Chloe is more than overjoyed, she truly believes fate has called the two back together. Max stopped Chloe from being murdered, what’s more fateful than that? Chloe gives Max a new camera, one that belonged to William Price, her father. Taking in their renewed friendship, Chloe cranks up her music to party and reacquaint more with Max. David’s arrival at home crushes this however.

David is a hardass, and we can see why Chloe clearly has no respect for the man. His inability to relate to Chloe and his paranoid tendencies DO NOT help him be in a good relationship with his stepdaughter. David seems to argue with her for the sake of arguing, sometimes completely unfair to Chloe. What’d she do this time? One of his guns was missing and that results in a very tense, heavy handed lecture from the so-called stepdouche. We can see he is worried since it is a gun, but the fact that he accuses Chloe without a shred of proof leads us to see him in the wrong. Max, who is hiding in the closet, can either step out or not. The latter results in David striking Chloe physically. They do not have a good relationship. However, stepping out and taking the heat for Chloe results in David storming off and Chloe being more than happy at her friend’s “bad-assery”.

After what happened earlier, we see that Chloe has stolen one of David’s guns. David’s paranoia seems a bit more justified now considering we didn’t know what happened to said gun, but now we know Chloe was the thief and she stole it for self protection against people like Nathan. We can see where she’s coming from this time around, especially since Nathan nearly kills her. A gun is what she needs to feel safe now. Not only from Nathan, but the other shit she has gotten herself mixed up in.

The duo head up to the light house, one of the only places that Chloe thinks is worthwhile in Arcadia Bay. The lighthouse is truly beautiful, but Max instantly recognizes it as the path of her nightmare earlier. We can see pieces of Chloe and Max’s history as well. They’ve carved their name into a tree stump and marked their fort on a map so they could find each other if they got lost. It truly shows how close these two were when they were 13 and 14 respectively. 

At the peak, we find how Chloe is indebted at the moment. Over 3000$ in debt. In an attempt to scrounge money, she attempted to get some from Nathan in a bar. Nathan, the ever so loved, drugs her and drags her back to his dorm. Here he undressed her, and crawled up on her with a camera in his hands. Chloe, not being one to be trifled with, easily fought back against him and escaped. From here on out there really is no way to justify anything that Nathan does. He is an antagonist. He is the villain. I will go into further justifications of this role for Nathan later on as more evidence against him piles up. Max then reveals that Chloe’s house is under surveillance, something that obviously sends chills down Chloe’s spine. Chloe knew it was happening, she just lacked proof until now. Something is going on in Arcadia Bay. Something odd.

Their talk is interrupted by another nightmare segment where Max makes her way to the top of the hill once again, this time discovering that the tornado is due on Friday of that week. Chloe snaps her out of her stupor, where Max collapses into Chloe’s arms. Chloe is obviously incredibly worried for Max, and Max immediately hops into the safest arms. Chloe’s arms.

While earlier Max can “attempt” to tell Warren of her powers, she ultimately doesn’t. With no hesitation, she tells Chloe of her nightmares and her new powers. Chloe reacts as expected of any rational person and assumes Max is high or delusional.

It begins to snow. Obstacles by Syd Matters plays. It’s the beginning of October in Oregon. “Max, start from the beginning.”

Chrysalis is an excellent introduction to these characters and the blossoming mysteries to be put forth. We get to know Max, we get to see how she views the world, and more importantly how she can utilize her powers for her own benefit. Max becoming reacquainted with Chloe serves at the entire game’s basis, and will lead them on their journey of growth. Stay tuned for an indepth look at Episode 2 - Out of Time.

In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.
—  The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald, 1925

humunanunga  asked:

I gave it some thought, and I did come up with just one thing! I think it may help your artistic growth to practice more diversity in head and body shapes. Personally, I've found that observing the Steven Universe style really helps breaking down body types in a way that's easy to adapt into personal artstyles!

ah!! yeah youre right! i guess i have been slacking with that lately ! but ive been trying my best not to ignore diversity!! (idk if its noticable in the art that i post on here cuz i dont really post that often anymore :’v ) but here are a couple examples of my partice with that sort of thing! (the first two are from back in august of last year so bare with me)

~~~~Warning for tiddies ~~~~

i think i need more practice with male body types tbh ive always had trouble with that (especially chubby males). and ive noticed my headshapes tend to be round most of the time. I’ll be sure to work on that!! Thank you!!

The Poetics of Disdain

There is simply all horrendous poetry festering on this site.

As an undergrad, poetic communities concern me. I worry about their health, their success, what their plans are, etc. It’s like taking care of all your family members, young and old. You spend time with them, remember their birthdays, and make sure they have what they need.

But this place? I don’t know if it’s the fact of it being completely digital or a blogging site, but it’s mostly trash. Too many people on here posting under “poetry” or “poets on tumblr” have tried to emulate Tyler Knott Gregson, other Instapoets, or simply “spill ink” and utter uncrafted blathering.

(Though, I suppose you could blather craftily.)

Nobody gives concrete details, explores the nuances of language, writes about their feelings convincingly, and has few other objectives than farming for notes. Everybody is writing virtual diarrhea and they’re getting praise for it.

I just dare anybody who writes like I detailed to go to a workshop. Try getting a serious following. Try getting magazines to publish you.

It may just be I’m looking in the wrong place for this, and I would accept that. Tumblr doesn’t seem to be a rich place for much of anything. But if that, I’d like somebody to explain to me why others consider their drivel poetry. That’s all I ask for.

anonymous asked:

I notice that in a lot of your art, you put a lot of detail into shading around the eyelids and nose. What would your art look like without that?

well i thought about it for a while on what that would look like if my recent art would look without those details. then i was looking through though some of my art and i realized that it would just look like my older art style from late 2015 to mid 2016. 

i noticed that the way i drew my noses didnt really give me enough “room” to put in a lot of details (but you can tell im trying tho heheh) and most of of the time my headshapes were very ,, “squished” and in a way to where i really didnt have enough room to do much of anything with the features. And at the time i didnt really know how to shade faces all that well so the way i would shade the nose would just make it look in-caved and awkward. 

now im gonna put my recent art here as a sort of comparison

(keep in mind i tried picking the art that clearly shows the details in the eyelids and the noses the most. i promise that not all of the people i draw look sleepy 24/7 …………. or at least i dont think they do…………. i tend to draw the sleepy look a lot…. idk)
because you mention the detail to the eyes and nose i started to realized that ive been adding more to those aspects because i now have room to do so. Cuz my faceshapes have become less squished and more realistic looking (and less baby like haha) 

thank you so much for the input! it really got my head gears turning!! 

Failure of character?

This was originally a debate I had on Serebii.net, but the posts were deleted for some reason. But it ended up making for a decent follow-up to this, so here we go.

In a “controversial opinions” thread on that forum, someone offered their opinion that Misty was a weak character who did very little during her run on the show. My counter to that was: of all the travelling companions, Misty is arguably* the most well-defined character, but among the most poorly served in terms of plot.

Misty’s core personality - stubborn, short-tempered, entomophobic, and a bit bossy, but basically good-hearted and with a deep love for Pokemon in general and Water types in particular - was established from the get-go. Right up front, she was presented as a multi-faceted character. I would never claim that any character in Pokemon was a masterful work of deep psychological realism, but Misty was always more than just an angry redhead. She could be used to give exposition, show sweetness and depth, give a punchline, or take laughs at her own expense, and all of this in a very natural and easy way.

As the OS went on, more facets to her personality emerged. The encounter with her sisters revealed a troubled home life and suggested feelings of inadequacy compared to her glamorous siblings. Caring for Togepi brought out a very defined maternal instinct in Misty. Her growing crush on Ash showed her to be unsure and uncomfortable with letting certain feelings show and gave her another point of vulnerability. And those last two things resulted in an evolution of her character; while she was still temperamental, she mellowed considerably as the show went on, her fights with Ash more likely to be playful and mutual banter/snark.

All this means that, on the score of creating and developing a character and personality, Takeshi Shudo and team did a fantastic job with Misty IMO. And the many sides to her character left her open for a wide range of story possibilities. Take Togepi, for instance. With Misty being such a motherly figure to the little egg, would that mean that Misty could inadvertently impede Togepi’s growth by holding it back from Pokemon competitions? If so, how would Misty learn to get over this? How would she deal with Togepi’s mysterious powers when she becomes aware of them? Might Togepi evolve sooner in this case, and how would Misty take that? How would a non-Water type fit in to the rest of the team? There’s a lot there for just one aspect of her character. Her strained relationship with her sisters could’ve also generated material had they become recurring characters, her relationship with Ash actually started to move in a fun direction during the Orange Islands, and her goal of being a great Water trainer was just as nebulous and loosely defined as Ash’s own goal, and thus open to any number of story turns.

None of which were taken, obviously. The Whirl Cup was an effort at doing something with Misty’s Water goals, but it was late in coming and under-developed. Her crush on Ash didn’t vanish after the Islands, but it did stagnate and only came back into play very late in the OS. After the Indigo League, her sisters never came up again except to drag her back to Cerulean. And Togepi just sat around looking cute until AG, at which point Misty was off the show as a regular and the story was more about Togepi himself than Misty’s care of him.

So in the end, that guy on Serebii did have a point; Misty didn’t get much to do story-wise. But that doesn’t make her a weak character. A weak character would be one who was two-dimensional and stagnant, or one who was dull as dishwater to watch, or one who was poorly defined and shifted personality depending on whatever the script of the day called for. That would represent a failure of character creation and development, a different sort of writing slip-up than the one that befell Misty. As I’ve said, Shudo aced it in developing Misty’s character. What Misty - and many other Pokemon characters - illustrate is the failure of a writing team to take advantage of their own good legwork to pursue interesting plot lines and give good characters material to showcase all their facets. The end result is similar; a frustrating viewing experience. But it’s an important distinction to make IMO when attempting a critique of fiction.

*Arguably. As in, if you feel otherwise, you could make a plausible case.

(I should add that this debate was perfectly respectful, and short. I have no idea why it got erased.)

anonymous asked:

How do i get better at writing my own scripts ?

Hello fellow writer,

You improve in three simple ways: read scripts, have people critique your work, and keep writing!

First: reading scripts not only gives you a feel for screenwriting, it shows you the different styles of storytelling and helps you recognize good writing from bad writing. You also learn what you personally like and dislike, which helps you hone your personal writing style.

Second: Have other people read your scripts. If you’re scared to show it to people, face that fear or you’ll never get anything made. When you show people your work, don’t be afraid of criticism because it is how you improve. If you think wrote the best joke in the world, but no one laughs. Take it out.

I was told to find at least two people to read your scripts: your most professional friend and your most honest friend. Your professional friend can tell you what you are doing right and wrong in terms of format and content in relation to the film business. Your most honest friend will tell you what they liked, but more importantly what they didn’t like. They are a real person who watches films and TV like the average person so they will react like an audience member, not like a film critic.

Lastly: Keep writing. You can’t create something good until you’ve created a pile of crap first. You get better with experience so give yourself more time to learn!

Good Luck and if you would like a “professional friend” message me! I critique but I’m not mean :)

Jules

What are We?

This is the original link (this post has some changes though): http://miss-zarzamora.tumblr.com/post/155866918089/what-are-we-a-victuuri-theory

I was originally planning to pose this as an ask to @thatshamelessyaoishipper​. 

But the more I tried to fit this into an ask format the longer it ended up being, so I’m just going to post this as a separate post, while still working as a counter-reply/inquiry/ask to this post: x.

Without further ado:

Yuuri and Victor are in the “we love each other but we don’t say or decide anything concrete about it” trope.

That’s pretty much it. I think people were working under the assumption that there was a moment where they talked openly about the state of their relationship. And I think that while there was a lot of communication, whether emotional or mental, and I think the writers did a good job trying to make them meet at the same places in many instances, there was also moments where they didn’t work on the same wavelength, and I think all of those are deliberate, including this little theory of mine. Even with the new information out (courtesy of @toraonice) I would like to think the theory still stands (Although I would like for someone to correct me if I’m wrong)

So, almost everyone takes the state of their relationship for granted, which is what I question in this post. But I think that’s on purpose, like the other times where they didn’t meet eye to eye.

It’s the “there is something strong but neither of us say what” trope. And then the “something big happens but because we don’t say anything about us, we are forced to decide to drift away when we actually want to stay together so we go about it by using ‘another reason (aka excuse)’ to do so”, this reason being Victor’s coaching and then the gold medal, subtly but heavily implied in the “you need to win at least five years” or even the “I wish you would never retire” from Episode 9. 

All of those, IMO, are indirect messages. This explains why some people were like “can’t believe they are conditioned by a gold medal” or even going as far as blaming Victor for doing this. They are not conditioned by this. They are using that as an excuse/venue because they never say anything. We all know that trope: There is strong attraction, flirting, sexual tension, direct not so direct words; there is the physical closeness, there could be sexual gratification (not talking about YOI for this one specifically) but no one ever comes out and says anything. Then there is the spin, a big decision to make, and it comes back to the ‘excuses’ “I thought you needed my help more” really meant “I thought you wanted to be with me”. Or that because the other person didn’t say anything then maybe they are not as attached and feel the need to let them go: “I can’t hold you down, you need to go back to skating” and then the slight dig for more information “but it was all your idea to end it at the Grand Prix Final”: “it was your idea to end it… Because maybe it wasn’t anything at all”. 

When Victor shed tears, I don’t think it was because Yuuri was retiring only, but because their “arrangement” would end, and they would not see each other the way they did for those eight or so months. 

They are indirectly talking about their feelings in that scene too. Victor shares more indirect information: “how could I go back to skating if you retire” meaning “I DO want to stay with you”. 

For people that said they were not talking about ending their relationship, I think they were, because by not saying it, and even when doing so, a big decision CAN break a relationship, but even more so when there is uncertainty of their relationship status, when for such strong feelings there is not a conduct to openly speak about it (the conduct being them openly and actively deciding to be a couple and then subsequently openly talking about their relationship). 

If they truly agreed on being boyfriends, the subject of retiring would have being far easier, because they are not anchoring themselves to their professional careers only, but to their well established relationship. Yuuri could well retire and go to Russia with Victor. This ambivalence/uncertainty is exactly why Yuuri not retiring and Victor wanting to come back was not a surprise for me at all. 

This shines through by Kubo saying “they both decided that couldn’t stay away from each other”. Why wouldn’t have they decided something way before? Because they themselves were being knuckleheads about it and not talking about it; that’s how I placed the idea on “miscommunication” between them. It was not Yuuri not saying what he was going to do only, it was the uncertainty of their relationship, brought on by their silence about their status. The scene at the beach is the principal clue in this theory. Victor openly asks what he can be for Yuuri, and Yuuri just says “Just be you, Victor”.

That’s how I placed one of the staff saying “I think their coach-student relationship is only the outer layer”. Why would they say “think” if they had decided to make them a couple before, even if it was off-scene?

For all the people that thought it was queer-baiting, they just didn’t get the subtleties. They were slightly right in one thing, some of them at least, they could have made some things clearer, but they didn’t because IT WAS DELIBERATE. I don’t exactly think they had to “mark off a certain list of ‘this makes a couple canon’” either, but they COULD have been a tiny bit clearer on some matters, but I think they weren’t because it was on purpose; that “negligence” was another message in and on itself. And again, it was exactly because of this that I was already expecting the outcome of ep 12.

For the people that thought they were leaning on too much on their professional relationship to discredit the whole matter: it was more because they were subtly communicating through that venue, and mistakenly relying too much on that; mistakenly in real life because literary speaking many enjoy that trope: to see two klutz being obviously in love with each other but not saying anything, upping the anticipation for when they finally do. 

More cues to lean on this theory:

1. Victor, aside from flirting with Yuuri in the first two episodes, did it so after (before their kiss in ep 7). I don’t think Yuuri would be dense to not see it. I think it wouldn’t be hard for Yuuri to feel immediate attraction to a gorgeous Russian skater either, but it was at the moment that he poked Victor’s head that Yuuri was attracted to Victor, the human, not Victor Nikiforov, the skating legend. I don’t think Victor wouldn’t make it clear what his intentions were either. He came on pretty strongly just right after meeting him, and still offered to be Yuuri’s boyfriend even when he understood that the banquet thing was not really the regular Yuuri of back then. Yuuri’s “I prefer you to be Victor” is not a refusal or ignorance about Victor’s intentions, but of his own restraint to know get to know Victor more, and yeah, maybe his anxiety. 

2. When Victor said “should I just kiss you”, many people thought it sounded very… couple like, and I saw here at Tumblr that some people even thought that they had become a couple off-scene between the past episode and that one when it first aired. I think it was because they had already gone that far off-scene, but they never really said anything about being a couple. 

3. The ring scene fits in perfectly too on the idea of “double entendre”. Victor saying it’s an engagement ring was his way of expressing that desire. Because truly… Yuuri never said anything directly before. I don’t think Victor would go out and proclaim that 100% seriously without consulting or talking to Yuuri about first. One does not singlehandedly, unilaterally proclaim marrying someone without their consent first. And I don’t think the staff wouldn’t include that if it were true. Again, I don’t think it was because “they don’t need to” but more because so it just didn’t happen, but on purpose.

Even couples (like openly established ones) can joke about it but still openly communicate before or after the joke. I think he meant it seriously not in the “this is indeed an ACTUAL engagement ring” but in the “I’m letting you and everyone know that’s what I want it to be”, which isn’t strange at all between people that love each other.

What I want to say is; that all their actions speak of romantic intimacy, but the one that tethers on uncertain grounds. The uncertain grounds of not addressing the elephant in the room:

 What are we?