While the new formalism and the digital humanities respond to identical material conditions, each offers a distinct solution to the crises afflicting the humanities. On the one hand, there is an institutional solution: critics who seek to repurpose the New Criticism for the twenty-first century imagine the university as their site of action and oppose incursions of postindustrial norms into college campuses. To save the humanities, critics like Gallop want the literary professoriat to return to what it used to do before the new historicism turned its attention to the archive—study and teach the formal nuances of literature. On the other hand, there is an extrainstitutional strategy. The digital humanities conceive their power to be more fluid than that of formalism. For better or worse, through their fluidity the digital humanities reproduce the hallmarks of postindustrialism—lexibility, teamwork, and so on—and, in doing so, dream of training people to contribute in the increasingly compressed spacetime of the global economy. This, I will argue, helps explain the popularization of the digital humanities—its rise, to cite a metaphor favored by literary researchers and financial analysts—at a time when humanists have failed to present actionable solutions to the many crises afflicting the ield
—  Andrew Kopec, “The Digital Humanities, Inc.: Literary Criticism and the Fate of a Profession”
Donations/Critiques Needed for Housing Help

I may need to move into an extended living motel situation for a month while I continue to look for a place to live. I can afford only part of this, so if you could afford a donation or if you are interested in a critique, it would be much appreciated if you would be able to help me out right now! 

I just reblogged my post on my critique rates and I take donations directly through my blog. I need at least a few hundred dollars to be able to add to what I have available to me to be able to afford an extended living motel for at least a month where I live in a safe area. 

Adding on my rates here so it stays attached to this post as well - I will be taking on as much critique work as I can, and if you have an amount of critique work not specified here just send me a message and we’ll talk. I also do line editing but my rates for that are higher because it requires more work, so message me for that too.

So, a lot of people have been asking me about my rates for critiques of lengthier works, but after some thinking I have a deal that I would like to offer.

For a flat fee of $100, I can offer a LENGTHY and THOROUGH critique and some very basic editing on a manuscript of around 40K to 50K (but no longer). I believe this is fair because I can complete this amount of reading and critique in an amount of time that wouldn’t take away from my other work.

When I say a lengthy and thorough critique, I mean that you will receive a document of no less than a couple thousand words detailing what I believe could be implemented into your story to strengthen it and help you improve upon what’s already there, how you can edit it to make it stronger, how you can break it up to create stronger chapters, etc.

(Likewise, if you have 20-25K I can do $50, etc.)

Since so many have been asking about prices, this is what I think I can do for the time being.

Mind you, I have professional editing experience for over 5 years now working for a professional writing company, I have extensive ghostwriting experience, and I have been professionally published myself in an anthology with bestselling authors, so I believe that this price tag is warranted.

My situation is desperate because I now have to move by September 1 - so in about a week and a half - and I still don’t have a place to live, and I have no friends in the area, nor do I have family that is able to take me in. My last close living relative passed away three years ago, as I’ve mentioned before, so this is a difficult time for me.

Please reblog for visibility if you can!

The works in Disguise: Masks and Global African Art are organized around the idea that masquerade is always an art of becoming.

Modeling these neon signs after actual historic masks in museum collections, Brendan Fernandes plays with masks as icons, signifiers for a supposedly authentic “Africa” that are nevertheless divorced from their original context. The masks also pulse questions about who they are in Morse code, becoming political platforms from which to critique the institutions of art history and museums.

Posted by Kevin D. Dumouchelle and Meghan Bill
Brendan Fernandes (Canadian, born Kenya, 1979). From Hiz Hands: 1979.206.143, 2010. One of three neon-on-glass-frame signs. Loan from the artist. © Brenden Fernandes. Photo: Courtesy of the artist

taveh submitted: I drew my OC as a light and colour practice and overall I’m pretty satisfied with the result but the the only thing that bothers me is the the hair compared to the face.I’m not sure how I could have made it look “fuller” without stepping out of my style.An overall critique would really help :)


Great colors! This looks pretty okay like this, if anything the background color makes the whole thing look duller, we’d recommend plain white.

To make the hair look fuller (we assume in terms of coloring), you might try to follow the strands instead of just splashing the base color here and there (which looks fine anyways in this case), we reblogged a hair tutorial not too long ago.

Other than that, everything looks good!

Keep drawing!

Mastery Is Not Literacy.

One of the greatest complexities affecting our ability to confront video games (and even board and card games) as artistic media is the matter of mastery as literacy. 

I want to be sure about what I mean. 

The video games media had a furor recently about whether a journalist (not even a journalist, most likely an intern) not being capable of playing a game perfectly for site footage capture is a sign that, as a result, reviewers aren’t knowledgeable enough to comment on a game. 

But, to me, by this logic asking people to play games in genres they’re unfamiliar with is asking people to not like the game anyway. 

What we need to get over at this point is that the notion of mastery is separate from the notion of literacy. It is possible for someone to not be good at the physical language of a genre and still be capably literate in it. 

Keep reading

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I doubt I’ll get any bites, but since it’s the theme of critiquing dogs I’ll post mine for you guys to take a crack at. ;) I’ll be happy to share my thoughts on them after. (And don’t be shy, whatever you have to say I’ve probably heard worse. :p )

Natsu is a 20 month old male GSD West German working lines.(And yes, that rise at his croup is coat)

Daffy is a 3 year old female GSD Czech/West German working lines.

Critique Sessions from Legit

So, a lot of people have been asking me about my rates for critiques of lengthier works, but after some thinking I have a deal that I would like to offer. 

For a flat fee of $100, I can offer a LENGTHY and THOROUGH critique and some very basic editing on a manuscript of around 40K to 50K (but no longer). I believe this is fair because I can complete this amount of reading and critique in an amount of time that wouldn’t take away from my other work.

When I say a lengthy and thorough critique, I mean that you will receive a document of no less than a couple thousand words detailing what I believe could be implemented into your story to strengthen it and help you improve upon what’s already there, how you can edit it to make it stronger, how you can break it up to create stronger chapters, etc.

(Likewise, if you have 20-25K I can do $50, etc.)

Since so many have been asking about prices, this is what I think I can do for the time being. 

Mind you, I have professional editing experience for over 5 years now working for a professional writing company, I have extensive ghostwriting experience, and I have been professionally published myself in an anthology with bestselling authors, so I believe that this price tag is warranted. 

Anonymous submitted: hey! I thought this looked sort of nice and I wanted someone else’s opinion. I know my art isn’t that great, but I haven’t had it critiqued before and I figured it could help me improve!


Hi! Don’t say that, your art is good!

Lineart: Many of the lines overlap, we’d suggest cleaning the lineart a bit. Also, regarding the folds, here’s some references for skirt folds if you wanna check them out!

Anatomy: The arms have different lenghts, careful on the position of the body too! It looks a little stiff right now. Don’t be afraid to use references! The proportions are pretty alright though, nice job!

Keep drawing!

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Yo I redrew spider pearl
Am I to late to do this I don’t actually know
I didn’t have the right colored markers so I had to use my crayola pencils
Her weapon is just a sword but it’s in its case always because I can’t draw weapons
Also i am aware that the anatomy is a bit off I’m still working on it
Critique?
~kiki-is-despair


Overall I love your style, it’s so cute!
I’m real bad at weapons too so i’ll just ignore that ahah

The body shape, even with a few minor anatomical mistakes, looks natural and flowey, The only mistake really visible with it at first sight being the thighs. The one on the left seems to be much thicker than the other. I mess this up quite often as well, I’ve found moving the thigh gap a little more over towards the side that has more mass (in this case to the left) to make it more even. The eyes look a little off to me but I can’t really pinpoint what it is?? I think maybe making them a little smaller in size will do the trick. I FIGURED IT OUT! It’s the eyelashes, They are very stringy and too long, try working in larger clumps instead of single strands.

Also… The hands. Good god are hands hard to do. Every artist I know hates drawing hands, the reason being it’s so hard to get them to look ‘right’ in your case, they look rather flat, especially the right one on the hip. I suggest grabbing as many hand refs as you can, study them, look at real hands, look at drawn hands, look at all hands, it will work wonders.
Here, have some hands that I’ve drawn, any of you guys can use these for reference if you want

-Mod Rat

Sharing Saturday.  THE FAN WARS

Today we watched the latest pony episode, and we found it very fascinating because it dealt with the topic of fan wars.  Which provides perfect timing to share some positive vibes about sharing what you like.

If you observe any fan argument from the outside, it always comes down to people trying to validate what they like, because they feel if someone doesn’t line up with what they love, that’s an attack to their ego:

“Superman is much better than Batman and would kick his sorry butt all around Gotham”

“BS!  Batman is a million times better than Superman because he is human and doesn’t rely on powers!”


What is being said here is “MY SUPERHERO IS BETTER THAN YOURS”,  which boils down to two stubborn goats, and what they are really saying is “I AM TRYING TO CONVINCE YOU THAT I AM BETTER THAN YOU, MY OPINIONS MATTER MORE, MY TASTE IS BETTER” .

If you are trying to convince someone that you are better than them, there is a “feeling small issue there!" 

When you realize that, you earn immunity to those comments *insert ZELDA open chest SFX here*.  Still, you want a verbal shield? “GOOD FOR YOU!” or “THAT IS FASCINATING”.  It never failed me to end the no-sense.

NEEDING to CONVINCE =  NEEDY, and NEEDY = ICKY for you and everybody else.

Wars over shipping X with Y! , over how an artist doesn’t deserve popularity over another..  Even claiming "romantic ownership” over a fictional character and bashing anyone who defies that .. for the love of G..

Over the years, I found simple mindsets that make this feel “right”, because they will both ADD to you instead of TAKING from you. If you want to give it a go, here is how I roll it:

1. If you don’t like it, leave it.   yeah, haha, very simple, but not always obvious when it is YOUR LIFE (specially when a core value is challenged).

I may profoundly disagree with some the values that are transmitted through someone else’s works, but I don’t need to educate them in “right and wrong”.
Giving negative attention  requires a lot of energy!your energy is precious! don’t waste it!

When you’re cold, you get something warm and wear warm clothes.. when it’s too hot, you seek ice cream and refreshment.. it’s our nature, we seek what feels good and make it all better.

Sometimes people bask in an argument because they choose misery over uncertainty.

By uncertainty, I mean going on a little journey to find something better.When you let the “meeeeh” thing go, you are left with a void for a little while, even if it is just a minute. what if you don’t find anything? what if  what you find is worse? ayayay…

Realize this is a , risk-less place to  to learn to have a little courage!  when you’ll see it works for you, you can branch it to bigger stuff, like not conforming to the “meeeh” workplace or college you are in right now, and going for something that is better for you!

Again, being a fan can be an incredible, empowering life experience, if you make it that way.

2. You don’t like it? I am curious, why so?  If someone hates our drawings, ideas or videos, I find fascinating to learn to know why. I always take those answers with zero judgement, and sometimes there are brilliant critiques hidden inside those gut reactions. Hell! I want the critiques! how else I’m supposed to grow if I don’t have any contrast?

It lets you know the other person better (or your audience), even if you don’t agree with them, if you realize that it is all about them, not about you. Worst case scenario? it makes no sense and it makes you laugh, and believe you me! some of the nut-job comments we get are comedy gold!

In conclusion, don’t even bother to convince anyone, instead, try to enjoy your experience and connect with others, you are all worthy and valuable. Learning to deal with critique  can add massively to your life.

If you choose to give this a try, I sincerely hope it makes you feel good. It does for me!

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I am now offering my services in RED-LINE CRITIQUE AND ONLINE ART TUTORING!!

Get art advice from a Savannah College of Art and Design alumni with professional experience! Improve your comic art and cartooning skills from a caring, personal tutor!! 

Contact me at Austinvanderwilt@gmail.com to schedule a tutoring session or critique!