critiqu

anonymous asked:

What do anti-psychotics do to people who aren't hallucinating? What happens in the long term? What if you suddenly stop taking them? My character is 28 and has been on anti-psychotics since he was 14 because he actually was seeing monsters but obviously nobody believed him and thus, drugs. If he stfu and took the pills (because due to Plot, they actually did mute the monster thing significantly), how likely is it he'd still be on them at 28? What would happen if he suddenly went cold turkey?

Being honest, Anon, your character is looking at some serious side effects. Here are some of the most notable / dangerous ones:

Involuntary movements:

  • Muscle spasms
  • Feelings of inner restlessness
  • Parkinsons-like symptoms
  • Tardive dyskinesia (which is irreversible, even if your character stops taking the medication!) I can go into TD in more detail if y’all want - I did a presentation on it recently!

Metabolic:

  • Weight gain 
  • Type II diabetes

Other important side effects:

  • Sedation (often extreme)
  • Increased chance for arrhythmia (with specific drugs)

And those are just the really serious ones! There’s a lot of other different ones too.

Certain classes of antipsychotics are more associated with different symptoms. For instance, the typical antipsychotics are more associated with movement symptoms, and atypical ones with metabolic ones. That’s not to say that an atypical antipsychotic can’t cause movement symptoms - it just does so at a much lower rate than a typical antipsychotic does.


Something really important to note - your character would likely not be on antipsychotics continuously for 14 years straight. Usually, a year or two after the first episode of psychosis, they’ll try to taper down and see if the antipsychotic is still necessary. If they have another episode, they’d go back on it, and they’d reevaluate after 3-5 years.

Oh, another thing - nowadays a lot of people taking antipsychotics long term actually don’t take pills; they get an injection. How frequently they get the shot depends on the drug, but it ranges from once every two weeks to once every three months.

Going cold turkey will indeed cause withdrawal symptoms - these symptoms are more specific to the drug in question.

Hope this helps!

Disclaimer

vimeo

@clueshq / coming soon 

clueshq is a brand new semi appless skeleton rp coming soon to the tags. based on the game clue and the new movie murder on the orient express, it revolves around 14 individuals who get invited on vacation by one of their friends – ariel kassis. when they wake up the next morning find murdered by someone in the house. now the guests can’t leave until they figure out who did it.

inspo blog

Technorealm Review: What to Expect

I was initially going to write a review based on multiple aspects of the story, including characters, plot, setting, flow of events, etc.

However, I’ve come to realize it would be super overwhelming to have everything laid out at once or make it too long.
(I do love to writing- and details- so it’s easy for me to get carried away.)

In light of this, I’ve decided to condense my review of Technorealm into three different sections (posts), all of which will be posted (in order) on different days and contain spoilers:

#1. Things done well. This post will include ten (10) things Technorealm has done well or excelled in, whether it be with characterization, dialogue, plot, or any other story aspect; it will also include a basic overview of the plot and main events . 

#2. Things to improve on. Here I’ll post ten (10) things Technorealm either struggles with or fails to accomplish. Along with this, I’ll also include possible solutions or ways to improve below each criticism.
Grammar, spelling, and sentence structure will be included in this section, but as a separate small piece at the end.

#3. Review summary. Here I’ll post a general summary of the first two posts, as well as my overall thoughts on the story, leading to a final conclusion.

**PLEASE NOTE:

My intentions are to be honest, fair, and gentle in my reviews, and I hope those who read them will see this as well.

From personal experience, having my work reviewed or critiqued hasn’t always fun or pleasant, but having this kind of feedback has helped make me into the artist I am today.

I’m hoping those who read them will share the same mindset. 

haven’t drawn a night sky in a while so now the boys are stargazing

Critique, the oily beast

Hi, it’s me again.

Below is a text of personal opinions that I’ve decided to share, concerning a downside of constructive criticism, and it might read as an angry rant. I apologize for that. Before I begin, I also want to point out that I’m not targeting anyone specifically. What I am doing is sharing my views on a behaviour that I’m not fond of. Parts of it is tongue-in-cheek, but the subject might be touchy. Wall of words after the cut, if you want to read it:

Keep reading

7

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME~ As a gift, I got myself the chutzpah to start practicing comics and long-form storytelling.

These are the first 6 pages of Fiend and Hera’s story, False Edge. It’s perfect for a first try: I’m invested in the characters, but without being so precious with them that I’m scared to mess up. Plus, it’s full of excuses to draw monsters and violence and gratuitous shots of Fiend’s butt. But for now: nice cat people.

ANYWAY if you wanna see where this goes (and where Fiend comes in), I’ll be posting new pages at @false-edge everyyyyyy what’s today. Wednesday.

Boy, I’m going to live to hate Wednesdays.

IMO the boundary between critique, purity culture, and censorship is this:

it is responsible, and the mark of a good audience, to critique problematic elements in the media we consume. For example, I love gothic lit - but a lot of it is incredibly sexist and racist. I can acknowledge that these elements are a problem and objectionable while still enjoying the piece for a multitude of other reasons. I can also say to myself “if I ever want to write my own gothic lit, here are some elements I should avoid.” Or, if I do want to tackle the issues of racism and sexism in my future gothic lit, then I can say “I will avoid writing in a way which implicitly or explicitly condones racism or sexism, while still emulating the praiseworthy elements of gothic lit.”

In essence, the fundamentals of intersectional media critique is this:  “these elements of [x media] are problematic and we should rethink them in future media, both as audiences and as creators.” By rethinking these elements, I don’t mean utterly doing away with them, but rethinking how we approach them and how we read them.

We enter purity culture when our statement moves from “these elements of [x media] are problematic and we should rethink them in future media, both as audiences and as creators,” and becomes “these elements of [x media] are problematic and therefore anyone who consumes or creates [x media] is condoning everything about [x media].” The implication here is that, if one wants to be a good person, one should avoid [x media], because to do otherwise is to either implicitly or explicitly condone everything in [x media]. This type of attitude towards media is very common in conservative religious circles.

It moves fully into censorship when the statement moves from  “these elements of [x media] are problematic and therefore anyone who consumes or creates [x media] is condoning everything about [x media]” and becomes “these elements of [x media] are problematic and therefore nobody can consume or create [x media] for any reason.” Those who break this rule are seen as evil and shunned. This type of attitude toward media is very common in fundamentalist circles.

A culture of censorship is the natural outcome of purity culture, because purity culture by its very nature seeks purity until even the whisper of objectionable content, in any context, is suppressed.

I would wager a guess that many people who are against anti culture are familiar with either these toxic conservative or fundamentalist attitudes towards media, and we are alarmed by their striking similarity with antis’ attitudes towards media. It is most certainly why I am against anti culture. 

Because there's still people who say this...

Lars’ descendance and culture has not magically gotten erased because of him turning pink. Lars is still the same Filipino kid he’s always been. He’s just pink. And for those that are saying it’s whitewashing, whitewashing is not only making a previously POC character white, but erasing all of that character’s previously established culture. Lars turning pink is not whitewashing, nor racist. Again, he’s still the same Filipino kid we’ve gotten to know.

Originally posted by sadiebarrigaofficial

Originally posted by aquamaspleen

On Fanfiction Commenting

I have been both a consumer and a producer of fanfiction since I was probably far too young to be doing either, so here are some of my tips on commenting on fics:

  • Comment. Please. Comments motivate authors to write.
  • Incoherently rambling is okay. One word comments are okay. Smiley faces are okay. I guarantee getting a notification that someone commented AAAAAAAH :D on a fic will make a writer smile.
  • Really long comments are awesome. You want to talk about your favorite scene? Go for it. You want to talk about how much you like a character? Please. Explain how well you think this writer fits within canon, or is better than canon, or gave you a new headanon.
  • Talk about how it made you feel.
  • If you read something a second time, or a third time, or a fifth time, tell them. Writers love to hear that. Tell them when you stay up all night to finish a fic. Tell them that you cried. Tell them that you laughed.
  • Be careful with critiques. Some authors are cool with them, some aren’t, but regardless, if you have a critique of the story, be gentle, be kind, compliment them too, remember that they wrote this and provided it to you for free, and consider not sending it directly to them.
  • If you think they got something particularly touchy (sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, etc.) wrong, first check to see if they say they are that thing that you think they got wrong. If they are, don’t say anything. People are allowed to interpret themselves however they want. If they aren’t AND YOU ARE, you can consider gently letting them know, preferably with thanks for attempting representation and maybe a link to a resource that might help them (unless they’re being malicious or have a particularly egregious error, in which case don’t thank them for representing you).
  • If there is one typo or mistake, let them know. if there are five, don’t. Most writers don’t want to go searching through their story to fix every typo they made at 3 am, but one thing is wrong–particularly if they wrote the wrong name–it’s not that much work to fix. They might not fix it, but you’re not putting much of an extra burden on them by letting them know.
  • If you read 50k words of a fic and then comment a dissertation on all the reasons you hated it, maybe consider just…stopping reading it, instead. You didn’t pay for it. You are gaining nothing from the cost of time of reading it. Go away. Also I will tell my friends about how ridiculous you are, and we will laugh about you.
  • Don’t share your life story. 9 times out of 10, we don’t care they you are uncomfortable with the idea of polyamory because your SO cheated on you and you think polyamory is like cheating and you don’t judge anyone else for participating in polyamory but you wouldn’t do it personally, so please, don’t tell us. (Fun fact, that’s a true story.)
  • “I would love to read more (of this story/of this world/of your works)” is fine (unless they explicitly say they won’t write more). “Have you thought about writing more” is also fine. “Hey, it’s been a while, I love your story and hope you post more” is pretty okay. “You need to write more” is a little iffy. “UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE” is kind of aggressive. “Why haven’t you updated, you terrible person” is way out of line.
  • Don’t be mean.

anonymous asked:

I saw last time you played Dream Daddy..! :o How was it? What do you think of the game? I love your blog btw!

Thanks! Hmm, well I could analyze the good and the bad of the game without taking its popularity and the way it was released and marketed into account but if I don’t do that I think it’s gonna be half my critique. Is Dream Daddy a good game? Perhaps. Is Dream Daddy deserving of its popularity and ratings? No. At all. I don’t want to be negative about it and this isn’t a hate post or anything, it’s just the things that really bothered me. Believe me, I was super pumped for the game. Like, legit, I WAS DRINKING CHAMPAIGN WHILE I STARTED PLAYING IT. And all was well and good but then, it went downhill. 

1) The game has 0 length. Like, I literally finished playing it in 2-3 hours, WITH breaks. Yes, I only played Craig’s route (Craig is cool btw) but this is a DATING SIM right? So, it HAS to be sufficient and has to be long even if the player just plays ONE character route. Because people are like “no it is pretty big”. It isn’t. Not everyone is going to play ALL THE ROUTES just so as to feel like they played Dream Daddy ‘a lot’. A dating sim game, cause that is what it claims to be, should NOT be valued by the sum of the time spent on ALL ROUTES, but just INDIVIDUAL character routes. 

2) The sprites were very nice and I loved them. The backgrounds HOWEVER were actually lacking. Again, the background is fine, but it is lacking in the CONTEXT cause Dream Daddy is supposedly a good game. Look at this: 

The background is literally some plain line art with some flat colors. No shading, no nothing. Yeah it looks good but cmon. Do you know how quickly a good artist can draw this? Very. Do not forget I am here to defend all Visual Novels and Dating Sims cause I really am a fan of the genre. And I am only making this critique in comparison to the ‘standard’, ok? HELL, even HATOFUL BOYFRIEND had better background art 

AND THIS IS A PIGEON DATING SIM IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW.

3) This is an addition to my saltiness about the lack of art, cause literally the ONLY ART FOR THIS GAME was the 1) Sprites, 2) Backgrounds AND 3) Those picture thingies you would get as a bonus for finishing the game/ a character route. Honestly. For people who are not familiar with visual novels and dating sims, this is LACKING at best. Most visual novels of this kind have art for important scenes and if not they at least HAVE ONE FOR AN ENDING SCENE. But not Dream Daddy of course. I literally was sleeping next to Craig and we had the whole confession thing happening inside a tent in the woods or smth and there. Was. No. Image. Anyways you get my point. Moving on,

4) The background sound was straight up bad. Not the songs themselves but the whole tuning and looping was horrid. Like, the different tracks were on different volumes and some would like stop and then start again without making the looping discreet or anything. I VIVIDLY remember my ears dying when I was in a forest with Craig and the ‘forest sound’ was so overly loud (and of course you could not hear Craig’s casual “ah”s at all). Man the sound was a mess.

5) Rushed, poor and Rushed once more. The characters were interesting and the setting and concept was good, I give you that, but the way they handled the plot and DELIVERED it however… Again there wasn’t any length to it and the writing could have been more detailed. Even in important scenes, there wasn’t much to be said. It honestly felt like they just wanted to get it over with. And honestly the plot was kinda flat. Like yeah ok we went on some dates or smth (with DADBOOk,,, ok uh huh)(they obviously couldn’t make it somehow linearly connected through the story and had to use such an easy way of doing routes cause that would basically mean a lot of work to make)(once again) and you’d get the casual heartbeat and nice smooth talking and jokes but that was it. The plot was average anyways. I guess the part with the teddy bear and the devil children dissecting it was a fun twist tho haha. 

Anyways! I am not really a person who rants or anything like that, and I am not AGAINST this game or anything. I still liked the game. I just had to speak the truth and say how it felt for me, especially with a successful game like this, since, in this genre of Dating Sims and Visual Novels, it’s very difficult to achieve such success or be advertised as much, and I am just trying to be just about this. A lot of people put so much EXTREME work into these games and they pour their soul into it, and achieve better quality, and it is just a shame that a game like this would be elevated and be called a ‘masterpiece’ when it was honestly a rushed game without much put into it besides some good ideas and a few interesting characters combined with a very talented sprite artist. 

alternate universe in which everything is the same but everyone is named aegon
  1. Aegon Arryn smiled tremulously. “Only one? Oh, Aegon, do you swear it? Only one?”
    “Only Aegon.” He gave her a short, sharp shove.
  2. “Aegon,” she said, tugging on his ear, “sweetling, I have known you since you were a babe at Aegon’s breast. You smile like Aegon and fight like Aegon, and there’s some of Aegon in you, else you would not wear that cloak … but Aegon is Aegon’s son, not you. I said so once to your father’s face, and he would not speak to me for half a year. Men are such thundering great fools. Even the sort who come along once in a thousand years.”
  3. “Let me tell you something about wolves, child. When the snows fall and the white winds blow, the lone wolf dies, but the pack survives. Summer is the time for squabbles. In winter, we must protect one another, keep each other warm, share our strengths. So if you must hate, Aegon, hate those who would truly do us harm. Septa Aegon is a good woman, and Aegon … Aegon is your sister. You may be as different as the sun and the moon, but the same blood flows through both your hearts. You need her, as she needs you … and I need both of you, gods help me.”
  4. “I am Aegon, father. Who else would I be?”
  5. “Aegon? Aegon? Do we know anyone named Aegon, Aegon?”
    “He means the Lord Commander.”
    “Ohhh. The Great Lord Snow. To be sure. Why do you want to see him? He can’t even wiggle his ears.” Aegon wiggled his, to show he could. They were large ears, and red from cold. “He’s Lord Snow for true now, too bloody highborn for the likes of us.”
    “Aegon has duties,” Aegon said in his defense. “The Wall is his, and all that goes with it.”
  6. Aegon, Aegon, it rhymes with freak.
  7. Only the kindly man knew the Common Tongue. “Who are you?” he would ask her every day.
    “No one,” she would answer, she who had been Aegon of House Stark, Aegon Underfoot, Aegon Horseface. She had been Aegon and Aegon too, and Aegon and Aegon, Aegon the cupbearer, a grey mouse, a sheep, the ghost of Harrenhal … but not for true, not in her heart of hearts. In there she was Aegon of Winterfell, the daughter of Lord Aegon Stark and Lady Aegon, who had once had brothers named Aegon and Aegon and Aegon, a sister named Aegon, a direwolf called Aegon, a half brother named Aegon Snow. In there she was someone … but that was not the answer that he wanted.
  8. “No more than me. It’s only Aegon who says I’m too dumb to be frightened. I get as frightened as anyone.” Aegon bent to scoop up a split log, and tossed it into the fire. “I used to be scared of Aegon, whenever I had to fight him. He was so quick, and he fought like he meant to kill me.” The green damp wood sat in the flames, smoking before it took fire. “I never said, though. Sometimes I think everyone is just pretending to be brave, and none of us really are. Maybe pretending is how you get brave, I don’t know. Let them call you Aegon, who cares?”
  9. Old Aegon had told him the same story once, Aegon remembered, but when he asked Aegon if it was true, his brother laughed and asked him if he believed in grumkins too. He wished Aegon were with them now. I’d tell him I could fly, but he wouldn’t believe, so I’d have to show him. I bet that he could learn to fly too, him and Aegon and Aegon, even baby Aegon and Aegon Snow. We could all be ravens and live in Maester Aegon’s rookery.
  10. “And I’ll serve you the same if you give me trouble,” Aegon threw back. “We’re taking the wench.”
    “Her name is Aegon,” Aegon said. “Aegon, the maid of Tarth. You are still maiden, I hope?”

Wait wait @bluepearl-criticism

I had an idea.

If pearl can’t speak about what happened, what about the other pearls?

You remember the old saying

Hear no evil

Speak no evil

See no evil

Well our pearl is speak no evil

Blue pearl’s eyes are covered is she see no evil?

And yellow pearls hair covers her ears is she hear no evil?


Did whatever happen to pd directly correlate to the pearl’s and their inability to discuss homeworld topics?

Am i making all of this up as i go along?

Idk tune in at eleven to find out

I feel as though I barely post any Sansa things on the blog during got season (since season 5 anyway) and I thought it was probably time to state why. I love book!Sansa. She is one of my favourite characters. I love how complex she is and she has great character development.

Having said that, I don’t hate show!Sansa. I hate how she is written.

(yes, there is a difference, hence why I’ll still reblog sets of her in scenes I like)

I saw a meta recently about season 7 (about the conflict in the North) and it summed up my feelings about the way Sansa is written in some scenes in one perfect word: contrived.

A key example of this is the scenes in this season with her and Jon when Jon is holding council. Twice now he has held a public council and show!Sansa has spoken against his decisions. This doesn’t fit at all with her character. Sansa was a lady at three, courtesy is her armour, she knows about image politics (that was amply learned in her time in the south). She would not speak against the King in the North publicly, undermining him, she would do it privately.

I’ve seen people in the tags defending Jon, defending Sansa, arguing over who’s right. It’s bad writing, simple as that. These actions do not make sense, but the writers wanted conflict, so it has to be Sansa speaking out publicly even if that isn’t something she would do, because the conflict is what they need to move the story to where they want it.

They’ve done this so much with show!Sansa. Plot progression based on character actions which are built on a solid foundation of characterisation and logical character development tells a good story. Instead they insert Sansa into these scenes (marrying Ramsay (when she is already married!), hiding the info about the knights of the Vale, being the negative voice in Jon’s councils) when we could have had Sansa in the Vale to begin with, bringing the knights of the Vale to take back the North (perhaps even at the same time as Jon’s assault with the wildlings!), then a natural conflict between her supporters and his, because a choice between a bastard son and a legitimate daughter should come with some consideration (and even more when they know that a legitimate son also lives).

Anyway, rant over, those are my thoughts

remember when Lars thought Steven’s gem stuff was ridiculous and would make fun of/be embarrassed by Steven, and he wanted to be so cool but had such deep rooted insecurity and NOW he’s the pink captain of a STOLEN HOMEWORLD SPACESHIP and he’s FIGHTING EVIL GEMS AND HAS A TEAM OF BEAUTIFUL DIVERSE GEMS TO FIGHT BY HIS SIDE AND THEY LOVE HIM SO MUCH JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE

MY STRONG AND BRAVE SON LARS THAT IS SOME CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT YOU CAN NOT CRITIQUE

Indie Game Reviews

Hello, everyone!
After I posted about the games I’ve platinumed I received a few asks about the Indie games I’ve played, so I figured: “Why not review my favourites?” Below is a list of Indie games I’ve played that I consider above average. Hopefully this list will help people decide if they’re worth playing or not. Keep in mind, though, that these are my opinions. If anyone would like to discuss the games further, please feel free to message me or send me another ask specifying the game you’re interested in. I’m always happy to discuss games. XD

Whispering Willows

Whispering Willows is like a throwback to the 90s computer games that we all loved and played when we were kids. With a spooky atmosphere and almost game board-ish feel, the story takes place on an old mansion property where a young girl named Elena Elkhorn must depend on her Native American roots to find her missing father. Switch between human and soul to solve puzzles, overcome obstacles, and attack enemies. Though a bit slow-paced, the story and gameplay are solid and definitely worth a try.
6/10

CounterSpy

CounterSpy is a fun little platformer that’s almost comedic in nature. You play as a (possibly) British spy during the Cold War, who spies on the Russian and American forces to prevent nuclear detonation on both sides. The missions are pretty straight forward, with you shooting or sneaking your way through enemy territory to discover their plans of attack. If you fail to thwart them … it’s the end of the world! While it isn’t really anything too special, its in-your-face 1970s James Bond style music and gameplay are entertaining as hell, and if you set it to the hardest difficulty, it is a fun challenge. I’d recommend it as a good time-waster.
6/10

Assemblance

Assemblance is a psychological first person thriller, where you play as a man who is forced to repeat a time paradox over and over until you figure out a way to move on. The story is subpar at best, but it’s not terrible. The graphics are beautiful and very relaxing, as is the music. I’ve heard this game be described as a “mind fuck” too, but I’m not sure if I’d give it quite that much credit. Either way, it is a good game if you’re looking for something to pass the time, and if you’re looking for a light challenge.
6/10

Velocibox

Velocibox is a pure challenge game where you control a tiny square that zooms through various obstacle courses. It doesn’t sound like much, but the levels can be extremely frustrating and the trophies are so hard to attain that they’ve only been awarded to a ridiculously small percentage of players– we’re talking hardcore gamers with no life (like me). If you’re looking for a fun challenge, this is the game for you.
6/10

The Park

The Park is a first person, mostly cinematic horror game, where you play as a schizophrenic mother who chases her son through a theme park that she used to visit when she was a child. As you play, you begin to ask yourself if what you’re seeing is real or if it’s just the result of the mother’s mental illness. There are a few jump scares and puzzles to solve, but all and all it’s basically a horror movie, with a child so un-likable he makes you miss the boy from Babadook. The story is worth exploring, however, and the graphics and voice work are topnotch. I’d give it a chance, unless you scare easily.
6/10

Race the Sun

Race the Sun is a meticulous challenger game where you steer a tiny plane through an endless field of obstacles. The objective of the game, aside from collecting trophies, is to simply beat your own record before you crash or run down. You collect extra points by hitting rings, which eventually allows you to upgrade your plane for future levels. While I will admit that at first the game is fairly addictive, it can get a little boring. You can’t memorize the fields because they change and randomize every 24 hours, which is a neat idea, but it still does little to keep players interested. But if you’re looking for a decent challenge, then I highly recommend this game. Personally, I’ve come to use it as a fun time-waster while I download other games.
6.5/10

Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture

Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture is a story-based video game where you divulge the disappearance of an entire town. I wouldn’t suggest this game to people who prefer action-packed shooters or tricky platformers, because aside from walking around and watching a beautiful cinematic story unfold, there isn’t much else to do. Don’t get me wrong, though; the game is still highly enjoyable. You play from a first person point of view and collect clues that give you insight to the missing townspeople. Each clue reveals a short story that helps you arrive at the conclusion, in the form of several astral projections. Aside from the creative story and stunning graphics, the voice acting is also incomparable. Definitely worth a play through if you’re into cinematic game play.
6.5/10

The Unfinished Swan

The Unfinished Swan is a first person puzzle game where you play as a young orphaned boy named Monroe. The game is relaxing and wacky, as paint your way through various levels to help Monroe finish his recently deceased mother’s favourite painting. As you play, a world of imagination unfolds, and the air of innocence reminds you what it was like to be a child. Definitely worth a try if you’re looking for something light-hearted.
7/10

The Fall

The Fall is a puzzle platformer where you play as an advanced robotic spacesuit AI named Arid. The game begins with you crash-landing on a seemingly abandoned planet, with your pilot injured and unresponsive inside you. In order to save him, you search the planet for medical supplies, but soon find that the robotic inhabitants are dangerously malfunctioning. To save your pilot, you must succumb to several tests, forced on you by the head AI, and defeat an army of homicidal robots. The puzzles are fun and challenging, the story is wholly original, and the twist ending makes you think you’re watching The Sixth Sense. If you’re looking for an intelligent Sci-Fi Indie game, you’re looking for The Fall.
7/10

White Night

White Night is a horror survival game where you play as an unnamed man who crashes outside of a haunted estate. Injured and in need of help, he hobbles to the mansion and breaks in, desperate when no one answers the door. Once inside the house, certain events transpire and horror ensues. I won’t spoil the plot, but there is a twist ending and a story worth experiencing. The game has a very noir-type feel to it on top of the horror genre, which I thought was very unique. To beat the game, you must outwit the ghosts that hunt you, solve puzzles, and discover clues that eventually prompt the ending. The game also does an excellent job at making you feel helpless and vulnerable, as your only defences are running, hiding, and depending on matches for light. I personally didn’t have this problem, but I have heard people complain about their eyes hurting after a few hours of gameplay– so as a warning, the game is almost entirely black and white. If you’re not sure if you can handle that, then I’d highly suggest watching a spoiler-free video on YouTube before buying, just to see how well you adjust. Overall, it’s a great game that I highly recommend.
7/10

Contrast

Contrast is a platformer clearly meant for the PC, but it is playable on consol. If I had to describe the setting, I’d say it’s almost Tim Burton-y in nature. You play as a voiceless woman named Dawn, who watches over and guards a little girl named Didi. Didi lives with her poverty-stricken mother in a tiny house in a town filled with corruption and debauchery. With no friends and nowhere to go during the day, Didi sneaks out at night to play; therefore, it is your job to make sure she stays safe. When her father starts meddling with some dangerous loan sharks, however, events transpire and you must help her save her family. Aside from some irritating controls on consol, the game is great and the story, obstacles, and puzzles are magnificent. The voice acting is also highly commendable, which was a pleasant surprise. Didi is actually voiced by a little girl, not an adult playing a child, and she did such an excellent job I thought Disney hired the cast. I definitely recommend this game, especially if you play on PC.
7.5/10

The Vanishing of Ethan Carter

The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is another story-based game in which you play as a first person detective searching for a missing boy named Ethan Carter. Much like Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture, the game is almost entirely cinematic with a gripping story and stunning graphics. While exploring various locations, you will find clues and solve intricate puzzles in order to piece together what happened to Ethan. Without spoiling the plot, I can only say that the mystery turns very dark and engaging. Definitely worth a penny or two.
7.5/10

SOMA

SOMA has repeatedly been praised by fans for its “mind-blowing” original story and designs, but I personally took issue with some aspects of the game. I will agree first and foremost that the story is fresh beyond belief: it begins with you, Ethan, booking an appointment with a famous neurologist after viewing a flashback of a car crash. It becomes apparent that Ethan suffered a brain contusion during the accident, which could, at any given moment, kill him. The next day you visit the doctor and agree to an experiment that could help Ethan and others like him. After a long conversation, you get strapped into a machine, then wake up in an underwater, apocalyptic hell. SOMA has also been described as a “mind fuck”, and you might agree, especially when it comes to certain choices you’re forced to make. I personally found the game to be a bit buggy, which is apparently common, slightly slow, and somewhat boring at times. The bulk of the game consists of you exploring a huge map and evading “monsters”, which can be rather irritating when they get too close. There are some horror elements to the game, but nothing spectacular. All and all, it’s worth a quick run through, if not for the story alone.
7.5/10

Type:Rider

Type:Rider is an educational platformer where you play as a colon (two dots) and work your way through several levels to learn about the origins of various forms of print. If you’d rather just play the game you can easily skip the information– but I promise you, it’s fascinating. You can learn about Script, Gothic, Times New Roman, etc. The game itself is a blast, but the history lessons work as an added bonus.
7.5/10

Oxenfree

Oxenfree is an intriguing supernatural mystery graphic adventure where you play as a teenager trapped on a costal island. What at first seems like a harmless trip with friends, it quickly turns into a living nightmare when strange events begin to occur. The story itself is distinctive and gripping, where certain decisions you make help determine the outcome. The game has several endings and multiple puzzles that require independent success or teamwork with the other NPCs. The gameplay is smooth and soothing, the visuals are clean, and the story is outstanding. Highly recommend.
8/10

Feist

Feist is an adorable platformer with some of the most intelligent enemies I’ve ever seen. If you’re up for a challenge, they’ll make sure you’re not disappointed. Though a mostly dark game, with the main character, the enemies, and much of the levels being a black silhouette, the game is fun and endearing. You play as a cute, unidentifiable creature that fights through obstacles to save his abducted partner. The game has a very primordial feel to it, with a sort of “survival of the fittest” connotation. Without the strength or biological advantages that your enemies have, you must rely on your superior intellect. The trophies are also incredibly difficult to achieve, half of them being speed runs, with almost no players having platinumed it. Aside from a few glitches that occur every now and then, the game is definitely worth buying.
8/10

The Swapper

The Swapper is a platformer where you must solve various puzzles by making and erasing copies of your own character. There is a story to follow, set in space, where you begin to experience weird occurrences. Each new area offers harder and harder puzzles, but nothing unmanageable. For me, the true wonders of this game are the graphics and music. The soundtrack is so beautiful and ambient that I found myself downloading the whole score halfway through the game. The map is relatively confusing when you get a bit further in, so you might find yourself lost every now and then. You do have to backtrack to some levels, so I suggest learning the layout early on. All and all, it’s a fun challenge well worth your time.
8/10

Wick

Wick isn’t a game I would recommend to anyone who frightens easily. The game is riddled with jump scares and portrays a haunting story about five dead children and their psychotic killer. Despite being a survival horror, there is a story to explore through certain clues that you can collect while playing. The game has several challenges, including a DLC that answers a lingering question that looms over you throughout the original levels. In order to beat the DLC, though, great memorization of the map and clue locations is required. Wick also holds some of the hardest trophies I’ve ever achieved for an Indie. The game itself takes place in a very small campground at night, where you are pursued by the five dead children. Your only source of light is a candle, which burns out if you don’t locate more. Each level runs longer and longer and introduces a new child every time, each with their own unique form of hunting you. If you decide to brave this game, prepare for a long night.
(Game is not as slow as the gif suggest)
8/10

Octodad: Dadliest Catch

Before I get into this game, I must be sure to tell everyone that it is likely a game for children, so I’ll be judging it from a child’s perspective. While I don’t see it winning a ton of awards, even as an adult I’ll admit it’s fun as hell. You play as an octopus with a wife and two children, so already the theme is ridiculous. To make matters worse, your family doesn’t know that you’re an octopus, so you have to do your best to keep it a secret. Throughout the game you must perform various mundane tasks, but as an octopus the controls are intentionally wonky, which makes for some hilarious accidents. There is also a story to follow with a rather adorable ending. The game is colourful, cartoonish, original, and warm-hearted. Perfect for anyone who’s looking for something soft and enjoyable.
8/10

She Wants Me Dead

She Wants Me Dead is a noir-type platformer, possibly set in New York City, where you play as a man trying to outsmart his homicidal cat. The cat, after being neglected by her owner, forces you to work your way through various traps and obstacles. The levels naturally get more and more challenging as you progress, but the game itself is incredibly fun. Additionally, only one song is played throughout every level, but it’s one of the most kickin’ songs I’ve ever heard in a platformer– “She Wants Me Dead” by CAZZETTE vs. AronChupa ft. The High. The beat of the music actually helps you determine when it’s safe to jump, which I thought was really cool. If you’re looking for a decent challenge, I’d highly recommend this game.
8/10

Layers of Fear

Much like Wick, Layers of Fear is a first person horror game filled with jump scares and a recurring theme of helplessness. Nothing scares me, but when I had my sister play this game she got a headache and threw me the controller– it scared her that badly. The game does a stellar job at recounting the story of a painter gone mad as you explore his house and piece together his past. Aside from the spooky atmosphere and wonderful graphics, Layers of Fear also includes one of the most hauntingly beautiful soundtracks I’ve ever heard. If you’re looking for a good mystery/horror game, Layers of Fear would be my first recommendation.
9/10

ABZÛ

ABZÛ is an adventure art video game where you play as a female diver who silently uncovers the ruins of an ancient civilization. The entire game takes place in the ocean, where the eco system seems to be terribly damaged and unbalanced. As you swim through each beautifully crafted level, you discover the reason for the imbalance and work to revitalize the ocean. The graphics are spectacular, the story is new, and, if desired, the game is also educational with nods to marine biology. The overall control of the character takes some getting used to, but I highly recommend this game to anyone looking for something uplifting and peaceful.
9/10

Typoman

Typoman is an adorable little platformer where you play as an all-black typographical character made up of the letters H E R O. The game itself is particularly unique, with every enemy and almost every level being made primarily of letters. The story sports a creative battle of good versus evil in the form of words, with “good” words having positive effects and “bad” words having negative effects. As the hero, you must solve puzzles and traverse through a post-apocalyptic wasteland to defeat the evil running rampant through the streets. The graphics are gorgeous, the story is amazing, and if not for the game’s unfortunate tendency to crash during the mini games and mild glitches, I would have given it a perfect ten.
9/10

Unravel

Buy it. Just buy it. I shouldn’t have to say anything else, but I will.
Unravel is a beautiful Swedish platformer where you play as a little red character named Yarny. As you may have already guessed, Yarny is made of yarn, and as you control him you embark on a journey to find multiple missing ornaments for a photo album. Each ornament produces a page of pictures that “unravels” the story of Yarny’s family (humans who don’t know that he can move). Each level presents a menagerie of fun obstacles and atmospheres. Aside from the flawless controls and beautiful story line, Unravel impresses players with gorgeous graphics and a soundtrack that could put Mozart to shame. Highly, highly recommend.
10/10

Inside

Inside is a puzzle-platformer adventure game that really tugs at your imagination. The story is multi-layered and brilliantly crafted without a single word of dialogue. Without knowing or understanding where the story is headed, you play as a nameless boy who traverses through many psychological puzzles, with danger lurking around every corner. Since the game’s release, no one has been able to decipher what the story is truly about, but if I had to guess, I’d say it presents an Orwellian dystopia that forces mind control on the masses and foreshadows our eventual future. I believe the entire game is a controlled experiment, wrought by the facility that you’re trying to escape– but really, who’s to say for sure? The controls, story, and graphics are crisp, seasoned, and endearing, and they convey a uniqueness of the highest calibre. Highly recommend.
10/10

Limbo

Limbo is a two-dimensional puzzle-platformer designed by the same company that produced Inside. Much like Inside, you play as a nameless boy who awakens in the middle of a forest on "the edge of hell”. How the boy died or if he’s even truly dead is a mystery. While searching for your sister, you encounter other hostile children, mechanical traps, murderous creatures, and all around unfriendly environments. As you play, you begin to wonder if anyone is trustworthy and if there’s a way out of the forest at all. The game does not hold your hand, so it is up to you to depend on your wits to succeed. Besides being pleasantly enigmatic, the gameplay is also awesome and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys peaceful but challenging platformers.
10/10

Journey

Journey is an interactive adventure game where you assume the role of a figure clad in robes. While able to play alone, online gameplay allows other players to connect with you, which enables you to share the adventure. The story is silently narrated through cut scenes that you unlock as you venture through the desert, eventually ending up at a snowy mountain. This game is definitely meant as a “feel good” type of platformer, with music and graphics that put some mainstream games to shame. The story consists of you, the character, realizing the fall of an ancient civilization while avoiding the giant automatons left over from the war that destroyed it. I would also argue that the journey you embark on is a quest to find your ancestors, who later guide you to paradise. While I couldn’t confirm this and it might not be true, I personally believe that this game was also heavily inspired by the Hinduism. For anyone looking for a relaxing, family-friendly adventure, this is the game I would recommend.
10/10

Little Nightmares

I’m sure that by now most of you have heard of Little Nightmares. Personally, my sister and I were looking forward to this game long before it hit the mainstream, and I’m happy to say we were not disappointed. Ironically enough, Little Nightmares ended up being one of the best Indie games I’ve ever played. With a Spirited Away meets Tim Burton feel, Little Nightmares gives us a puzzle-platformer horror adventure game superior to all others. No one knows the true plot of the story, which has sprung theory after theory after theory from fans, as you work your way through the mysterious Maw and avoid being eaten. I also have my own theories, but if I went into that we’d be here forever. I’ll simply say this: Little Nightmares triggers your imagination and keeps you on the edge of your seat. While some people have complained about the slow load times, the only complaint I have is that it’s relatively short. I could have played this game for days without getting bored. The horror element is almost kid-friendly, the graphics are stupendous, and the character designs are out of this world. I might even start collecting the comics.
10/10