critic magazine

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January 19th 1809: Edgar Allan Poe born

On this day in 1809, the American poet and writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts. The young Poe barely knew his parents, with his father leaving the family and his mother passing away when he was just three years old. He lived with another couple as foster-parents, and was forced to gamble to pay for his tuition at the University of Virginia, which he had to drop out of due to financial difficulties. He soon joined the army and was accepted into West Point, though he was expelled after a year. After leaving the academy, Poe turned his full attention to his writing. He then traveled around Northern cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore; it was in Baltimore, in 1836, that he married his young cousin Virginia. In Richmond, Poe worked as a critic for various magazines, occasionally publishing his original work which included short stories and poems. In 1841, Poe published his ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’, which many consider the beginning of the detective fiction genre. His most famous work, the poem ‘The Raven’, was published in 1845 to critical praise. Sadly, his wife died from tuberculosis two years later, leaving the writer grief-stricken and nearly destitute, as he never had great financial success.  On October 3rd, he was found ill in Baltimore and taken to hospital, where he died on October 7th aged 40. It is still unknown what his precise cause of death was, but alcoholism is widely believed to have played a part. While not appreciated in his lifetime, Poe is now considered one of the great American writers.

“Lord, help my poor soul”
- Poe’s last words

flickr

The Smart Set by Kevin Lightner

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />Thanks to Luis Cesar

Photograph by Juergen Teller

The Agony and the Ecstasy of Kanye West

For over a decade, the rap superstar has made music that pushes boundaries, courts controversy and divides critics. Now, the man who has compared himself to Jesus and Steve Jobs just wants to make clothes for the masses. 

See more here

Courtesy of Larry King Now

King of All Media | Larry King’s Internet Afterlife

Larry King has looked like a retiree for at least three decades - like the snappiest dresser at Boca Raton assisted-living facility - but he only stopped working in 2012, and not by choice.

See more here

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January 19th 1809: Poe born

On this day in 1809, the American poet and writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts. The young Poe barely knew his parents, with his father leaving the family and his mother passing away when he was just three years old. He lived with another couple as foster-parents, and was forced to gamble to pay for his tuition at the University of Virginia, which he had to drop out of due to financial difficulties. He soon joined the army and was even accepted into West Point, though he was expelled after a year. After leaving the academy, Poe turned his full attention to his writing. He then traveled around Northern cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore; it was in Baltimore, in 1836,
that he married his young cousin Virginia. In Richmond, Poe worked as a critic for various magazines, occasionally publishing his original work which included short stories and poems. In 1841, Poe published his ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’, which many consider the beginning of the genre of detective fiction. His most famous work, the poem 'The Raven’, was published in 1845 to critical praise. Sadly, his wife died from tuberculosis two years later, leaving the writer grief-stricken and nearly destitute, as he never had great financial success.  On October 3rd, he was found ill in Baltimore and taken to hospital, where he died on October 7th aged 40. It is still unknown what his precise cause of death was, but alcoholism is widely believed to have played a part. While not appreciated in his lifetime, Poe is now considered one of the great American writers.

“Lord, help my poor soul”
- Poe’s last words

 “I told them i wanted to put a black girl on the cover, after 90 years they only had two black girls on the cover, and i said i would really like the future to be more diverse. We were thinking Halle Berry or Beyoncé. And i said, maybe i can get Beyoncé to do it because i am really good friends with her husband’s lawyer. I sent my idea to Bey and she loved it”.
The shoot was a success, though it wasn’t without it’s controversy- one of the images, in which Beyoncé’s face was darkened, prompted some to criticize the magazine for what they perceived to be blackface. “She is portraying a Moor Queen and they wore face paint, this is part of our African heritage. It’s not blackface”.
Beyoncé impressed with Tailly asked him to be her creative director shortly after the shoot. “It felt natural because i wasn’t campaigning for any kind of job. I just wanted to create a beautiful shoot”. The two collaborated for 3 years, including on her influential 4th album 4, before amicably parting ways. “We’re still friends, but i needed to be freelance again”.

Jenke Ahmed Tailly on Beyoncé’s 2011 L’Officiel Cover Shoot

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The Mission Critical Baby Carrier

If you are a parent of a baby, you know all too well how important is to have your child safe and properly secured. Also, it is of vital importance for the baby’s early development to carry it properly, and have its head and neck supported at all times.

Taylor Swift’s army of loyal followers – aka “Swifties” – have a storied past of coming to the chart-topper’s defense whenever she’s faced criticism.
—  People Magazine

due to all the public holidays this week, I essentially have one day to do a good portion of my job. just gone past middnight and we go to print at 6am. Here is one of the things i just finished. 

“For such a sexually active group of people, the student populace knows surprisingly little about the end goal: orgasm. Critic’s Josie Adams explores the body areas and methods for having the best time.”

looking forward to McD’s for breakfast.

wish me luck. :)

Inside T’s Culture Issue

T’s Culture issue shines light on innovators in their many forms. In our cover story, the New York Times pop music critic Jon Caramanica explores the ever-expanding empire of Kanye West - hip-hop superstar, expert button pusher and now, clothing designer - as he attempts to broaden the reach of fashion, one sportswear collection at a time. 

See more here