crisis of faith!

The Lying Detective: more like the lying perspective

ok. i want to talk about this. i think the theory in which our boys are intermittently drugged with TD-12 is very possible. i’ve been on the fringes of this theory for a while, certain that SOMETHING other than the drugs Sherlock is taking (because heroin or cocaine do not cause hallucinations - because whilst withdrawal could cause insomnia, we see that Sherlock doses just before he goes in to meet Culverton. He is not withdrawing here. He’s literally just used, they made a point to include that). We got a really good discussion going over here, my previous meta/theory/whatever on Sherlock and his drug habits - we concluded that he’s probably taking a whole bunch of stuff, but for the sake of this particular meta, I’m going to assume he’s not wandering around London with a myriad of different, incredibly illegal substances. The context of the conversations had point to him needing a ‘top up’, which makes me think heroin (even though he says he feels ‘psychedelic’ which isn’t really… heroin, but I think he’s just referencing the fact that he’s high rather than anything else). He’s also not really “acting” high, which sort of makes sense seeing as heroin users get to a point where they need more just to function normally (and Sherlock’s been off his tits for weeks, so- yep, makes sense). 

So, we know that for the morgue room meeting, Sherlock is NOT withdrawing. We know that he is pretty much… in control, or he certainly feels as if he’s in control. He has a plan, he thinks it’s going to work. He’s smug and he’s absolutely certain of his abilities.

Except it sort of… stops working in that morgue room, and Sherlock is suddenly confronted with a crisis of mental clarity via Faith. I think this sudden shift from confidence in his abilities to the realisation that he got it wrong sort of sent him spiralling. This is where the TD-12 shit comes in, because I cannot think of any other way to explain this particular scene away… 

Sherlock is hearing auditory hallucinations. His mind begins making connections that are not there. He sees Culverton pick up a scalpel when he is the one to pick the scalpel up, we see him begin to physically lose his grip on reality and he, quite understandably, freaks the fuck out. He feels as if he’s being mocked, moments after Culverton has mentally mocked and derided John and his abilities as a doctor: Culverton has made both of these men question their sanity and their usefulness in the space of minutes. But here’s the important part: I think Sherlock hallucinated more than just the laughing. I think Sherlock hallucinated the severe kicking he got from John, too. Let’s break it down.

Sherlock isn’t just experiencing auditory hallucinations here. He’s seeing Culverton laugh, he’s hearing it and he’s seeing it and it makes him angry, likely because he feels as if his intelligence is being mocked. But check out this screenshot: this is a pretty freaky thing to see, so it’s no wonder Sherlock begins feeling threatened. 

This is where it starts to get a bit Nuts. Sherlock brandishes the scalpel and demands Culverton stop laughing - and yet even when Culverton says he’s not laughing, the laughing continues in the background. John is forced to step in, to control the situation and the blatant manic episode Sherlock is going through and he’s forced to punch Sherlock to snap him out of it.

What does John say to Lestrade, in the scenes running intermittently between this morgue scene?

“I really hit him” Odd thing to say, if you’d kicked someone too. Surely you’d say “I really hurt him’ rather than put emphasis on ‘hit’ if he’d actually kicked Sherlock into submission, because that wasn’t just a singular ‘hit’. That was… brutal, honestly. 

Here’s the interesting part, the camera zooms in on John’s hands, just before the beating above is shown.

Keep in mind that this beating is so bad that Sherlock spits up blood. This is like, internal organs being kicked to shit bad. 

But here’s the thing, in the following scenes, that blood? Completely disappears. 

Where’s the blood? Are you telling me that in a show where they physically painted a pub door sign for literally two seconds of footage are going to forget to place the blood down? nope, sorry, not convinced. 

So, here’s what I think ACTUALLY happened in handy dandy bulletpoints:

  • John gets in between Sherlock and Culverton when he sees the scalpel
  • John crowds Sherlock up against the morgue doors
  • John punches Sherlock when he realises he’s not snapping out of it
  • Sherlock falls and hits his head against the morgue doors, which is why he needs stitching on his eyebrow. I literally have no idea where this eyebrow cut came from otherwise. 
  • Sherlock probably gets a concussion here, let’s be real, so anything that happens in between falling to the floor and John apparently being dragged away by goons that show up out of nowhere should be questionable at best, possibly even including the I killed your wife dialogue. 

The only other POSSIBLE explanation I can have for John beating Sherlock in this way is if he, too, is drugged, and starts having a massive PTSD freak out but that doesn’t account for the missing blood. 

Either way, I don’t think this scene happened the way it’s been set up, because there’s too many inconsistencies. John’s characterisation here is really weird at best: I can’t see him beating the shit out of Sherlock like this without some sort of… trigger? who knows

anyway thanks for coming to my ted talk

@the-7-percent-solution @teapotsubtext @goodmythicalmail @whatiwassuggesting @jenna221b  @watsonswaltz

The Last Jedi Teaser Poster Anyalsis

Worth a Thousand Words

An Analysis of The Last Jedi Teaser Poster

Having just returned home from Star Wars Celebration: Orlando, I am filled with emotions, excitement and anticipation for the next installment of the Skywalker family saga. I was fortunately enough sit in the The Last Jedi panel, after 20 hours of sitting on a concrete floor, and an additional 10 hours before hand, queueing outside. However, that panel was worth every second of the wait time. And while most people will say the long anticipated teaser trailer stole the show, as an artist and illustrator, for me, the star of the show was the teaser poster, that was also revealed.




My jaw literally dropped as I stood in stunned silence as the crowd cheered around me. In fact, my line buddy, a member of the 501st by the name of Matt, repeatedly asked if I was okay as stood agape at the poster, amazed in it’s brilliant design as well as very clear and intentional use of visual story telling. I was flabbergasted at the bold choices made by Lucasfilm in this teaser poster, and I do believe that this is more of an indicator of the film’s story, rather than the trailer. This poster tells us, the viewer, everything we need to know about the direction of the upcoming movie, as well as helps dispel the rumors that The Last Jedi will be nothing more than a carbon clone of The Empire Strikes Back.

Before I go into detail I just want to say that it’s no secret that I ship reylo, however, for the purposes of this discussion, I am setting aside my implicit biases and talking about the facts stated in this poster, rather than fan speculation and conjecture.

First and foremost, what stood out to me is the simplicity in the poster’s design. We see only three characters, Rey, Luke and Kylo Ren. After doing extensive research, I found that this is the ONLY poster with just three characters. All previous Star Wars posters depict the main ensemble of cast members, as far back as 1979’s A New Hope. Never before has a Star Wars poster depicted only three members of the cast, and it is a clear statement that these three characters are the most important in relation to the story. There is also a not so subtle nod to Luke Skywalker in the original promotional theatrical poster for A New Hope. Both Rey and Luke are positioned in almost the same spacial area, in the same pose, with an ignited light saber raised up. For Luke, this symbolized his acceptance of his heroic journey, and the inherent power he possessed. For Rey, however, the meaning is vastly different. The sequel trilogy is very much about passing the torch from the old generation to the new, and unlike in The Force Awakens, Rey is present and accepting of that power, physically and metaphorically, in The Last Jedi, the second installment, rather than the first. Rey is our new hero, now heroine, embarking on her own heroine’s journey.



Now I know not many fans like Kylo Ren, and in fact they perceive him as a whiny emo cry baby, trying his best (and failing) to emulate Grandpa Vader, but his importance in the story cannot be overstated! He is the descendent of Darth Vader, and Leia Organa, and as much as most fans dislike him, that’s just simply a fact! The Star Wars trilogy movies are about the Skywalker family, and he is the new Skywalker of the trilogy. He is important to the cinematic universe as a whole, and characters from the The Force Awakens who easily had double the amount of screen time as him, such as Finn, were purposefully omitted from the poster in lieu of Kylo Ren. Regardless of how much fans like his character, he is going to play a very impactful role in the film to come. I know that he is not the most important character or the focal point of the poster, however, given the overly negative response he solicits from fans, I felt that it is important and necessary to make my position, and the poster’s narrative clear; even if you don’t like his character, Kylo Ren is a key player in the Skywalker family saga, and the cinematic universe as a whole.

When analyzing any piece of artwork, regardless of the the medium, the best jumping off point is the focal point. In The Last Jedi teaser poster, the viewer’s eye is immediately drawn to Rey, brought forth by the strong contrast of the blue halo of light emitting from her lightsaber. In terms of visual hierarchy and storytelling, she is the most important element to not only the poster, but in the movie it represents. Her position, in the lower center of the foreground suggests that she is the most grounded of the three characters, and thus the one that we, as the viewer, is meant to relate to the most. However, she is removed from both Luke and Kylo, positioned below them, which indicates that she was not a initially part of their conflict. And originally, she wasn’t. Rey was just a scavenger, abandoned by her parents on Jakku, struggling each day to survive. At that point, Rey didn’t know or care about the Force, Resistance or the First Order. Her primary goals and motivations were pure and simple, survival.

This coincides with the backstory indicated in not only The Force Awakens but also in Claudia Grey’s novel, Bloodline. There are no indication that either men knew who Rey was or her origins until she found BB-8 and became tangled in fight with the First Order. Luke and Kylo have a contentious and tumultuous past, filled with conflict and anger, as they stand on opposite sides of Rey’s light saber. This is a visual metaphor for the Force, and where Luke and Kylo represent the Light side, and Dark side respectively. Separating them is Rey, and the light of her saber. Although she is removed from their history, Rey has been flung into the foreground of the struggle between opposing sides of the Force. She is part of their present, and thus their future. In short, the resolution of Luke and Kylo’s conflict rests on Rey’s shoulders, both metaphorically and visually in the poster.

The struggle been Kylo Ren and Luke is an interesting and important to the story, but what is more important is what it represents! At its core, Star Wars is a fairy tail, and was intended to tell stories and teach children about the human condition and morality. Understanding every detail of Luke and Kylo’s past is less important as what their struggle represents. It is the timeless struggle of good vs. evil. If the timeline in Bloodline is to be trusted completely, and there are no extra twists and turns in the interum, Kylo Ren turned to the Dark side of the Force approximately six years prior, and has been unable to locate or confront Luke since his disappearance. What has changed in that time? Why will Kylo suddenly be able to locate his former master on Ahch-to? The answer is right in the poster, Rey!

This of course opens the doors to a whole new set of theories, such as a Force Bond, or Snoke obtains a copy of the map and so on. But there is practically no solid evidence to substantiate any of these claims, and at this point, they are pure conjecture.

I also find Rey’s placement in the middle quite interesting in the wider context of the history of the Force itself. One of the central themes Star Wars has always been finding balance. In the prequel trilogy we saw this through Anakin’s development from the heroic Jedi knight, to the Sith Lord, Darth Vader. And yes, Anakin is responsible for choosing his actions and must therefor accept the consequences of such actions, however, the biggest contributing factor to his descent into darkness was the Jedi Order and their absolute refusal to acquiesce to the basic human nature of love and attachment. In fact, one can argue that the Jedi Order is even more barbaric and cruel than the Sith. Companionship and attachment is one of the hallmarks of humanity, and by denying them, they are essentially denying being human. But the Jedi Order in both the prequel and and original trilogy was the personification of the Light side of the Force, while the Sith representing Darkness. Too much of either side’s influence causes the Force to spiral out of balance, and thus the galaxy is thrown into chaos again. This was demonstrated numerous times on both sides, such as Anakin’s betrayal, or the New Republic unknowingly creating the groundwork for the First Order.

In short, the brighter the light, the darker the shadow. Both light and dark must be present in order to achieve balance, and Rey’s placement, directly between the light and dark, makes her the fulcrum, or the point of equilibrium. In essence, it is Rey who is who is going to bring about that balance.

Another interesting observation I made was that all three characters, Luke, Rey and Kylo Ren are all colored in red. I cannot stress this enough, the psychology of color is important! Specific colors invoke particular and subconscious imagery and responses. Color theory and its use in marketing and illustration is a universal language. In fact, color tells just as much, if not more, of a story as the composition! There are two primary colors in the poster, red and blue. Red is the color of darkness, evil and passion. Blue on the other hand conveys serenity and tranquility. Why is Kylo’s lightsaber red? Not because he uses the Dark side of the Force, but because the color red has a strong visual impact and the human brain automatically associates red with darkness and power. It’s no coincidence that the color red is associated with the Sith, while blue is attributed to the Jedi! Everything you see on screen or in print was designed to create a specific response from the viewer and convey as much information as possible with no words.

Further more, in both The Force Awakens and the teaser trailer for The Last Jedi, it’s made quite clear that our heroes and villain are all experiencing a crisis of faith in the Force. Rey had her entire existence turned up on its head looking for guidance and training. Luke, it is suggested, fell into despair and solitude after the death of his acolytes because his teachings and philosophies failed to save his own nephew. Kylo, who just recently murdered his own father in hopes of committing himself entirely to the darkness, felt more weak and confused than ever before (this is said nearly word for work in The Force Awakens novelization). Because the color red is frequently associated with the dark side of the Force, and I find it quite compelling that all three figures are bathed in red. To me, this suggests that the trio are all going to be struggling with their inner demons, which often implies the temptation of the dark side. In fact, the only beacon of light and hope comes from Rey’s light saber. Some have argued that the light comes from Rey herself, but when you compare her upper body to her lower body, you can observe that just like the figures above her, Rey’s form is red, and the blue reflected in her face is emanating from the lightsaber, rather than Rey herself. This coincides with Rian Johnson’s choice to make the Episode VIII title font red, and maintains visual continuity. The most logical conclusion one can extrapolate is in The Last Jedi is going to delve into much deeper and darker overtones and story lines than it’s predecessors.

The positioning of Luke and Kylo in relation to each other is another aspect to this poster that I find intriguing. Luke and Kylo’s heads are above Rey; in this poster they are literally watching over her, and her choice to accept the Skywalker lightsaber. However, they are on opposing sides of the saber, as described above, representing the light and the dark. As a viewer, this design illustrates a sense of tension and conflict in both Luke and Kylo, but also in how they view Rey, and her choices. This image is clearly setting up the overtone that Rey has to struggle between choosing accepting either Luke or Kylo. In other words, it’s another iteration of the never ending struggle between the light and the dark.

Looking back in The Force Awakens for a moment, we remember that Kylo Ren extended the offer to teach Rey, “You need a teacher. I can show you the ways of the Force!” We all know the choice Rey makes at the end of the movie, but what about Luke? Will Luke even want to teach Rey after his previous failings at reviving the old Jedi Order? The following does begin to tread into the territory of conjecture and theorizing, however I do believe there is solid evidence to back up what I am about to speculate, or else I would have omitted it form this analysis. At The Last Jedi panel, Daisy Ridley, under the watchful eye and ear of Kathleen Kennedy, did reveal some very interesting information. We, as the audience were MEANT to know this information prior to viewing the poster, or else the CEO of Lucasfilm would never have permitted that information be divulged (like the Rogue One mishap at Celebration Europe 2016). Summarized, Daisy stated that Rey indeed does meet her hero, Luke Skywalker, and like in real life, how we  (Rey) envision our heroes does not always coincide with the reality of our heroes. This very clearly sets up the idea that Rey and Luke are going to have a less than harmonious relationship in The Last Jedi. This is also backed up by some previous leaks and spoilers from MakingStarWars.net, however until we know the veracity of those rumors, I do not treat them as fact, like I do the things said directly from the people at Lucasfilm. The statements from Daisy Ridley at the panel, however, were purposeful in sparking ideas and igniting the flame of this idea that Luke and Rey will not have a peaceful mentor/mentee relationship in the same light as Yoda and Luke’s relationship.



Mentorship has always been another key themes throughout the Star Wars saga, from Anakin’s tutelage under Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jinn, to Luke studying with Yoda. There is every indication that those reoccurring themes will continue, but in a different fashion. It’s been made pretty clear that Rey is going to struggle with Luke’s training, and we already know of Kylo Ren’s unrelenting conflict within himself, stemming from the teachings of Supreme Leader Snoke. Snoke ordered Kylo to kill his own father, an act that he did follow through with, but the novelization has proven that that act made him more conflicted than ever before. Where it should have brought him strength, instead he found weakness and doubt.

And all of this ties back to Kylo Ren’s original offer to Rey to teach her. It is my belief, based on the evidence above, that Rey is going to struggle between the teachings of Kylo Ren and Luke. You may ask “how will Rey learn from Kylo? They aren’t on the same planet?” Well even that is partially answered in Episode VII, and confirmed in tweets made by Pablo Hidalgo. Pablo definitively said that Rey learned so much so quickly at Starkiller Base because she extracted the information from Kylo Ren’s mind during the infamous interrogation scene. So in a way, Kylo has already become her first mentor.

Both the Light and the Dark are justified in their beliefs and teachings. Adam Driver previously stated in an interview that Kylo Ren vehemently believes he is and was justified in his actions, and it’s quite clear that Luke fully intended to disappear into the galaxy as a frizzled old hermit. What will happen if Luke does not agree to initially train Rey? She has all of these newly awakens powers, and no way to control them. Just like Kylo stated, she really does need a teacher. But which teacher? The Light or the Dark? Or, at what this poster suggests, something in the middle!

By placing both of Rey’s mentors above her, two Force users who are much more skilled and honed than she is, it indicates that both mentors are going to be fighting within Rey’s psyche. Luke will be teaching her one method, while Kylo and his Dark side influence will be pulling Rey in the opposite direction. This is wiring and character growth done right! The setting and characters have been established in the first film of the sequel trilogy, while the second installment places challenges and obstacles in their path. Without those challenges, characters will not grow or develop. Even more evidence for this is Rian Johnson’s prior statements that the characters in The Last Jedi are going to be tested and pushed beyond their limits. What would challenge Rey more than knowing she is can identify and relate to the person she hates the most, Kylo Ren? That would force the characters into a position where they have no choice but to adapt and evolve into something that spans beyond the juxtaposition of the Light and Dark side of the Force.

In other words, Grey Jedi!

Most likely it won’t be in so many words, but the concept behind it will remain the same. A world of Force users that are not bound by the narrow dogmatic codes of the Jedi or Sith! And while I do find both of their ideologies absolutely fascinating an an integral part of the Star Wars canonical universe, by constricting Force sensitives to Jedi/Sith, Good/Evil, Light/Dark is extremely limiting and grossly inhibits the idea of character depth, subtlety, progression and nuance. Maz Kanata and Ahsoka Tano are prime examples of Force sensitive individuals in the Star Wars universe who are canon and are Force sensitive, but do not fall into the dichotomy of Jedi and Sith. There has never been a main hero character in the films (which are the primary story telling means in the entire franchise that reaches the most viewers and has the biggest impact on mainstream pop culture). Luke Skywalker was seen as universal good, the epitome of the Joseph Campbell’s hero, who embarks on heroic journey on behalf of goodness and justice. The passing of the torch from Luke to Rey indicates a paradigm shift in the understanding of the Force for not only the characters but the viewers and fans as well.

The light saber in the poster is another piece of evidence for this! There is no partition between red (Darkness) and blue (Light). Instead there is a gradient emanating from both ends of the lightsaber, further emphasizing that this story will not be so simply as “kill the monster, save the world” but instead of dimensionality and gradation. There is middle ground to be found in the Force between the Light and the Dark, and Rey is the key to unlocking it. Or as Rey quite simply puts it in the trailer “balance.”

                                                        ********

On a personal side note, I do believe this teaser poster does further add fuel to the Reylo fire, and it makes be believe even more fervently that Reylo will eventually become canon in some iteration, but I wanted to keep my personal biases and theories out of this analysis. If anyone enjoyed reading this and would like to read my views on The Last Jedi teaser trailer and how it relates to Reylo, I’d be more than happy to comply. But I wanted and needed to get this poster off my chest first. My mind has been boiling over, wanted to put these thoughts down in some sort of organized fashion because as someone who is fluent in the language of illustrations as a medium for visual story telling, this poster blew my mind. I stood just flabbergasted at how blatantly the story implications were, but when I asked people about their thoughts they all came to different conclusions. And yes, that is the point of this poster, to get people talking and theorizing about what it all means, however visual story telling generally complies with a set of rules that are universally, albeit often subconsciously, understood by the viewer.


 Whew! I wrote this entire analysis in a single sitting. I apologize if there are any immediate grammatical errors, but I proof read this a number of times, so I am pretty sure that it’s correct. 

EDIT: Thank you to @sleemo who helped me fix the grammatical errors in this!

It’s come to my attention that amidst the glory that is Wonder Woman many people are saying “This is what a DC movie should be like” and that godforsaken article “the dceu is in trouble everyone liked Wonder Woman” all the while blatantly ignoring the vivid and prominent parallels between Wonder Woman and the other DC movies, specifically Man of Steel and Batman v Superman, because they seem to be at center of all the vitriol. Some of these aren’t parallels necessarily, just things BvS and MoS have been criticized for that magically no one mentioned about Wonder Woman.

Let’s start out with the most obvious, yeah?

1. Wonder Woman was FUN!!!

No. It wasn’t. Let me explain, I had a blast in this movie, it moved me, it made me laugh, it made me cry, it made my blood pump and while I am so blown away by seeing a movie directed with the female gaze and with all these amazing female warriors, this isn’t a FunTM movie. It’s set in World War I for god’s sake. It never shies away from the atrocities experienced by the citizens and soldiers in this war. It shows realistically what PTSD looks like through Charlie. It brings up interesting and complex ideas and hard facts about racism, politics, sexism and the arrogance of mankind. There are light moments for sure, but it isn’t bouncy happy fun all the time. I would say it isn’t humorous or light the majority of the time either. It’s a very serious movie, it expects you to take it seriously and you do. The thing is, Batman v Superman and Man of Steel are the SAME way. There’s humorous moments, light moments, but they are serious movies with complex ideas about heroism and being an immigrant in a strange world and how the darkness can corrupt even the most justice and moral driven of heroes. I had in watching them. I had amazing experiences. So did many others. But none of these movies are “fun” movies. They don’t shy away from sacrifice or darkness. They acknowledge that. You can have fun experiencing the movie, and laugh at its humor, but it isn’t a lighthearted film.

2. Colors!!

I mean, we’ve all hear the terms “dark and gritty” and “lacking color” when talking about the DCEU, which is frankly bullshit but I digress. Wonder Woman wasn’t really “colorful” either. Themiscyra was, but I mean it’s a magically hidden island of Amazons from ancient times. But as soon as they leave the island, the world is grey and dark and dismal. Diana calls it hideous. But this didn’t seem to detract anyone from enjoying the movie or following the story. Diana’s suit isn’t even that brightly colored, something Henry Cavill’s Superman has been criticized constantly about. Both movies use color and the lack thereof, shadows, darkness, to help tell the story.

3. Mental health/Triggering

Both Wonder Woman and Batman v Superman tackle PTSD in very real, pointed ways. Each depicts scenes where characters clearly struggle with nightmares, triggers, and outbursts from what they’re experiencing. Both did so in a compelling and realistic way and yet one was mocked relentlessly and one was not. Batman v Superman lingers on the mental health issues the characters are experiencing more, but they are central parts of the story and how it progresses. Bruce’s PTSD is what allows him to be manipulated by Lex’s games. Charlie’s PTSD is real and heartbreaking, but he is surrounded by friends and people who understand, Bruce is largely along besides Alfred who honestly doesn’t now how to help anymore.

4. The name game

So something I heard over and over as a criticism for Man of Steel was
that no one calls him “Superman”. People said Zack Snyder was afraid to use the name, despite the fact this was an origin story and he wasn’t Superman yet. Despite the fact that Captain Ferris calls him Superman by the end of the film(and I agree Ferris, he’s totally hot). Yet Wonder Woman was not called by “Wonder Woman” in the film and no one seemed to have any problem with that.

5. Stories about sacrifice

This one really gets my goat. Man of Steel ended in the destruction of Metropolis, but the hope we could rebuild. Batman v Superman ended with Clark’s death, but the idea that men are still good, justice is coming. Wonder Woman ended with Steve’s death, but that love is the most powerful motivation for heroism. All three of these things are important, and yet BvS was trashed for implying that heroism requires sacrifice and Clark should have just given Diana the spear. Well, as Wonder Woman also expertly showed us, sometimes, you can’t do everything. Diana told Steve whatever it was, she could do it. But she couldn’t. There was no time. He could save the day, but she needed to save the world. In Batman v Superman a similar situation unfolds: a creature from another word. Batman has the gas, but he’s a weak human compared to Doomsday. Diana is strong, but she’s holding Doomsday back with the lasso. And there’s Clark who knows that he has to do something. He has the spear. When you can do something you have the responsibility to. That’s what being a hero means. So he does. In both cases that sacrifice reminded the heroes of what heroism really is about: hope, love, the fact that humanity is deeply flawed but worth fighting for. This lesson is also demonstrated in Man of Steel when Clark has to kill Zod to save a family.

6. The Hero loses faith

When Batman v Superman came out Superman/Clark was heavily criticized about the fact that he has a crisis of faith, right after the bombing and before Doomsday it really looks like Clark is going to give up. That he’s going to hang up the cape and give up the dream of being the people’s guardian. Diana has a similar experience. After fake-Ares is killed and she sees that nothing stopped, she has an absolute breakdown. Her entire worldview, everything she was taught was shaken and uprooted. Steve tries to convince her that people are worth believing in, and when he can’t he goes back to doing what he must do. He must help save people. In both situations, the heroes are put to the test when people they love are put in danger and face real doubts about heroism and themselves. In both cases, each hero makes the choice to continue the battle. Diana saves Doctor Poison, choosing to believe in humanity and and take down Ares. Clark does his best to reason with Bruce, who he considered a violent vigilante, to stand down, and even after the fight goes beyond his control he begs him to save Martha, he doesn’t care if Bruce kills him first, as long as he saves her. He puts his trust in Bruce’s humanity and THAT is why they are able to put their differences aside to help fight Doomsday. In both cases the crisis of faith were important developmental moments, showcasing to the audience how grueling and disheartening being a hero is sometimes. Sometimes people don’t understand, they vilify you, they mistrust you. Sometimes you don’t win, and those failures have a high cost. Do you keep going? Both these movies answer yes.

Listen, I’m really not asking you to like the other DC movies if you liked Wonder Woman. They are different movies and each film had different strengths and weaknesses, but I am saying that as a whole MoS and BvS have gotten some pretty unfair criticism due to largely what I think comes down to Zack Snyder. Some people don’t want to like his films, so they don’t. But in the light of all that Wonder Woman is getting praise for, which it deserves, that both the other films did well along side it is hypocritical. Patty and Allan did an incredible job, but I would like to remind people that Zack casted Gal Gadot, not Patty, and Zack, along with others, helped write the story that Allan adapted into a screenplay. This movie was a team effort in a grand scheme of films that had its own wonderful unique qualities while sharing the ideals and driving force that its predecessors did.

Who the Hell is Apollo Justice? - an AA5/AA6 critique

A twitter thread reminded me that during NaNoWriMo last year, I wrote 1,600 words on why Apollo in AA5/AA6 frustrates me so much.  Be warned, this is only very lightly edited, so it’s more of a ramble than a full essay. 


So, Apollo! Lemme start off by saying that character-wise, e.g. personality and dialogue and whatever, I don’t really have any objections to how Apollo’s portrayed in AA6 or AA5 (give or take some of his DarkMode angst in AA5-5.) People go on and on about how AA5 and AA6 “totally redeemed” him but he honestly doesn’t feel that different from AA4.

The trouble with Apollo is basically everything surrounding him, and how it was handled.

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Guardian (IXX)

Author: kpopfanfictrash

Pairing: You / Jongdae / Baekhyun

Rating: PG-13

Word Count: 6,211

Summary:  You keep seeing the same guy everywhere you go. In the coffee shop, on the streets, in your philosophy class. It’s getting to the point where you think he’s stalking you - only to realize that maybe there’s something much more mysterious at play here. 

Originally posted by baekhyunsama

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anonymous asked:

Can you tell us more about your "Austrian" grandpa? When did your family figure out that he was a Russian Jew? Was he fleeing the tsarist draft?

I’m not sure if he was fleeing the Tsarists specifically, or Russia in general.  

GG had suspected he wasn’t actually Austrian, mostly from the heavy Russian accent and the fact that he barely knew anything about Austria.  He had some kind of crisis of faith prior to meeting her and was always uncomfortable discussing matters of faith.  Which kind of worked out fine for GG, because being a third generation agnostic was hard in the nineteen teens.

But, when a guy never eats pork “out of habit” you get an idea.

As he got on in years, he started developing dementia. He gradually lost his ability to speak English,   So he started speaking German, then he started to lose that and spoke only Russian at the very end.  Mom still knows a smattering of both languages form communicating 

He also lost the ability distinguish what happened on TV from what happened IRL and started doing things like thinking he had lunch with the Queen of England because she was on TV while he was eating.

This sounds really tragic but Grandpa Adam quickly realized that he was losing it, and decided that it meant he didn’t have to deal with anyone else’s nonsense anymore.  Also, since he was retired and could stay at home, there wasn’t much issue in indulging him.

So mom would come home from school and ask grandpa what he did that day, and would listen to how he had a political discussion with Mr. Gorbachev.  Grandpa Adam had trouble with reality but DAMN if he didn’t have some great diplomatic ideas about how to end the cold war.

TVLine May Sweeps Preview and Finale Spoilers

PRE-FINALE: Though most of your favorites will survive the impending “death wave” — which arrives in 10 days! — executive producer Jason Rothenberg says we should prepare to say goodbye to at least one more character this season: “The stakes are real. If they weren’t, the show wouldn’t be as emotionally involving for people.” In the meantime, Clarke will attempt to “figure out who gets to go inside” the bunker, which fits roughly 1,200 people; Bellamy will continue working through his “crisis of faith,” desperate to find “a way out of the darkness”; and Octavia’s journey is “about to go into orbit. It’s crazy what we’re about to see from her.” As for Becca, “These people have been in her house and her lab, and she might not be happy about that — you know, if she was still alive.” 

SEASON FINALE (MAY 24): “The finale unfolds almost in real time,” Rothenberg reveals. “The season has been constructed around the idea that the clock starts ticking in the premiere … and when the finale starts, we’re at the 44-minute mark. The click is ticking loudly. It’s breathless.”

Arya Stark + The Old Gods of the North

Even though Arya hasn’t been in the North since her first chapter, she has remained firmly connected to her Northern heritage and has many links to Northern people and sites. The most obvious link to her heritage is her continued faith in the old gods. 

Like her siblings, Arya grew up in a dual-faith household.  But as the novels progress and she endures hardships and atrocities, she begins to struggle with her faith in both religions.

Back in Winterfell, Arya had prayed with her mother in the sept and with her father in the godswood, but there were no gods on the road to Harrenhal, and her names were the only prayer she cared to remember. – ACOK

She even gets to the point where she blames the Seven and the old gods for not saving her parents.

Sometimes her father had prayed a long time, she remembered. But the old gods had never helped him. Remembering that made her angry. “You should have saved him,” she scolded the tree. “He prayed to you all the time. – ACOK

They are not my Seven. They were my mother’s gods, and they let the Freys murder her at the Twins. – AFFC

Though Arya’s crisis in faith leads her to disconnect with the Faith of the Seven, she still continues to believe in the Old Gods of the North. This is evident in the way she mentions the Old Gods wanting her to keep Needle, the symbol of her family and home.

The gods wanted me to have it. Not the Seven, nor Him of Many Faces, but her father’s gods, the old gods of the north. The Many-Faced God can have the rest, she thought, but he can’t have this. – AFFC

She also mentions the old gods in TWOW when she sees one of the criminals she wants to execute. 

The gods have given me a gift. – TWOW

This continued connection may have to do with the fact that, unlike the Seven, she knows that they Old Gods are real. In one of the most powerful scenes in the entire series, the gods reach out to Arya through the weirwood in Harrenhal and speak to her in her father’s voice.

"You are Arya of Winterfell, daughter of the north. You told me you could be strong. You have the wolf blood in you.”

“The wolf blood.” Arya remembered now. “I’ll be as strong as Robb. I said I would.” She took a deep breath, then lifted the broomstick in both hands and brought it down across her knee. It broke with a loud crack, and she threw the pieces aside. I am a direwolf, and done with wooden teeth. – ACOK

With Ned’s words and voice, the gods reawaken Arya to who she really is and galvanize her into taking action in a way she hasn’t dared since being taken prisoner and enslaved. 

In A Clash of Kings, Arya is repeatedly frightened into submissiveness and loses confidence to the point where she no doubts who she is. Instead of being a direwolf of House Stark, she sees herself as a meek lamb and a timid mouse. Even when she regains some measure of bravery as the Ghost of Harrenhal, the strength she feels isn’t her own. That newfound power is completely rooted in Jaqen. Once she loses her wishes. Arya knows she will go back to being helpless. 

That’s what makes Arya’s scene with the Old Gods so powerful. The gods aren’t providing her with strength. They don’t plan and execute her escape from Harrenhal. Instead, they are reminding Arya of the power and strength within her, which in turn leads Arya to reclaim who she is and rescue herself and her pack from their imprisonment. 

This scene very well could be why Arya continues to believe in the Old Gods all the way into The Winds of Winter. It’s also likely that this won’t be the last time the old gods influence and guide Arya, if Bran watching her warging in Nymeria is any indication. 

“IT’’S A TERRIBLE PLAN! AND IT WAS MINE FIRST!!!”

This probably won’t make sense to anyone who isn’t me, but let me try.

I was trying to explain my position the other day in a discussion about dusttale and Papyrus’s likeliness to be a willing co-conspirator in that kind of situation.

I was trying to express my opinion that even if there was an endless cycle of genocide runs and both brothers somehow remembered them, and even if all hope was lost, the second such a plan was actually vocalized, I felt like Papyrus would decide there had to be another way. He would never go through with it or support it unless he was completely corrupted beyond recognition (even if he was of sound mind but completely compromised morals). I was trying to express a very difficult to explain series of headcanons and analysis, which made this a personal exception, even though I enjoy Papyrus crisis-of-faith plots, angst, face heel turns, and the brothers actually being on the same page. I was trying to be both eloquent and elaborative. 

But instead all my mind could conjure up was a scene of sweet, sweet sibling hypocrisy.

I suppose that’s as good a reason as any not to murder everyone you’ve ever known and corrupt the very culmination of your being in a bloody, dusty final stand.

Thoughts on Wonder Woman that literally nobody asked for:

  • I loved the little girl and her face and everything she stands for omggg
  • That scene?? where antiope trains teenage diana?? and hippolyta enters all furious?? and these ~50~ year old sisters just fight and make up and agree?? SIGN ME THE FUCK UP MATE OHMYGOD
  • Okay but as brutal as it was to watch antiope die, for me it was actually worse to watch the beginning- where the bullet flies for the first time, and strikes an amazon who’s jumping behind diana- and diana realizes the true horror of what’s happening. 
    • Like to see the effects of war on this paradise island
    • was
    • heartbreaking
  • steve’s scene in those pools. I AM JUST——- [insert incoherent mumbling/sobbing/shrieking here]
  • Diana is innocent and shining and beautiful. I would totally die for her. She will make Steve believe in Ares with the strength of her own belief. That boat scene slayed me a thousand times over.
  • Coughs and slides into a puddle on the floor about diana saying, “baby” bc i have never seen such pureness EVAH it turned my skin clearer than a fucking transparent sheet of plastic.
  • SAMEER
  • LET ME SAY IT AGAIN: SAMEER.
    • “I AM NOT THE RIGHT COLOR.”
    • just rip my heart out you little ball of wool and wanting and teeth, just tear it out, ohmygodddd
  • Also, ummmm, that scene. Right before Diana gets ice cream. bc there were sikh soldiers and SO MANY soldiers of color and I did not expect that but I was so glad to see them.
  • I- as much as I understand why steve and diana shared that night- didn’t really like it all that much. Honesttogod would’ve liked it better if they’d kissed on the tarmac. 
    • That said, the scene was shot. so. well. 
    • all dark and intimate and silent. PERFECTION.
    • Apologies to gifmakers though that scene must still be causing y’all nightmares lmao
  • “What I do is not up to you.”
  • ALSO ALSO ALSO: that scene where diana rides off with the horse- after the village- it was such a parallel to the scene in the beginning, where she’s a little girl and in the perfect world and everything is sunlit and bright and golden; but now diana’s raging and armored and fierce as any goddess, in a darker world; tired, and still, despite it all, lovely.
  • (Apparently if diana looks up and closes her eyes and thinks she’s at peace, everything will just become worse. This happens twice, jfc.)
  • “Maybe it’s not what you deserve.” 
  • “Maybe I don’t deserve it.”
    • Listen, I am many things but I am such a sucker for the way Steve Trevor doesn’t pin his hopes on Diana and walks away from her on that tower- he loves her; he does, but there’s no time for Diana’s crisis of faith here. And Steve tries to bring her back to him, but when she refuses- he has to go. He walks away. And he doesn’t hold it against her, because she’s from another world and another culture, but he doesn’t coddle her about it either.
    • And then Diana fights back and she fights forwards and Steve has faith in her even after all of it.
  • Diana knows paradise, okay? She knows paradise, she’s lived there for centuries. And Ares shows her this paradise and shows her what he plans and shows her what could be-
  • And Diana closes her eyes. Diana imagines.
  • And then Diana says, “I could never be a part of that.” and gives up her vision of paradise in favor of reality 
  • There was a meta talking about Diana wielding a sword and how it was the antithesis to her character bc it’s a masculine weapon and I’d just like to say that I went into this movie expecting to hate it and then that sword got fucking DESTROYED and it was such a cathartic moment
  • Chief and Sameer and Charlie resigning themselves to death. Together. Knowing there is no way out; deciding, eyes wide and open and hands clenched tight- they were shadows at the end, lit against flame, visible only through their silhouettes- and they just ripped up my heart into a thousand pieces I hate them all so much.
  • Chris Pine’s eyes have never been bluer than when he points a gun back at a cargo of bombs and swallows. He looked so young; looked so afraid; but he kept those blue eyes open and pulled that trigger and idk man but he is the son of my heart and I will never let him go, like ughhhh.
  • But tbph that scene where Isabel Maru’s mask rips off- was just. so- poignant.
    • beneath the plastic; beneath the half-human half-machine monstrosity that is isabel’s face; beneath this person who is a villain in the purest sense of the word- 
    • there is a scar.
    • there is fear, and loss, and just- mortality. 
    • And Diana sees, even in the depths of a grief deeper than anything she’s ever known, and she chooses not to kill Isabel. 
  • Diana chooses to kill Ares with his own power, which was an amazing choice. Also that scene where she fights him with the lasso on the rooftop? I will never get over it. NEVER.

So, like, this movie is fucking iconic and also fucking amazing and I am fucking ended ohmygod.