crime society of america

anonymous asked:

do you think Eric would've liked "the Purge"?

Yeah, the whole plot of the movie is Eric’s ideal society after all.

Movie synopsis: In an America ravaged by crime and overcrowded prisons, the government sanctions an annual 12-hour period during which all criminal activity – including murder – is legal.  James Sandin (Ethan Hawke) and his family face the ultimate test when an intruder drags the vicious outside world into their home. James, Mary (Lena Headey) and their two children struggle to survive the night while trying not to turn into monsters like the ones they are striving to avoid.

A Quote from Eric:

“if humans were let to live how we would naturaly it would be chaos and anarchy and the human race wouldnt probably last that long, but hey guess what, thats how its supposed to be!!!!! society and government are only created to have order and calmness, which is exactly the opposite of sure human nature. take away all your laws and morals and just see what you can do.”

Racism = privilege + power

In order to be racist, you need to possess two traits. The first is privilege: A structural, institutional, and social advantage. White people occupy positions of racial privilege, even when they are disadvantaged in other ways. White women, for example, consistently make more than black women, because they benefit from racial attitudes. Furthermore, you also have to have power: the ability, backed up by society, to be a strong social influencer, with greater leeway when it comes to what you do, where, and how. For instance, white people benefit from privilege and power when they aren’t arrested for drug crimes at disproportionate rates, while black people experience racism when they’re arrested, and sentenced, for the same crimes. This reflects a racial power imbalance in the justice system. People of colour talking about white people don’t occupy positions of privilege or power. Therefore, they cannot be racist. Racism is structural, not personal.

As most of you know, I am currently in Japan. As fewer of you may know I am currently in Japan because I won a scholarship by writing a couple of essays on how I am interested in disability in Japanese society. Although I am not just interested in it in any old way - I specifically wrote that I am interested in how parts of American culture can learn some things from how parts of Japanese culture approach disability, to the long term betterment of how disabled people are treated in both cultures. I’m particularly interested in developmental disability and mental health. 

So because this is the biggest reason why I am in Japan, ever since I got here I have been quietly noting things about disability and engaging as best I can among everything else I’m doing, comparing and contrasting with the U.S. 

On the first day I met fellow disabled students in my program, all of us excited to be in Japan. On the second day I started noticing where around the cities that universal sign of disability is plastered. On Saturday I went into a bookstore and perused all their volumes on developmental disability and autism, happy to see them promoting an overwhelming acceptance and accommodation of difference. On Sunday I started noticing how many things are designed as accessible to blind or deaf people. Later that week I talked with a Japanese student about disability in her country and we shared a disdain for anti-vaxxers in the U.S. surrounding autism. This past Monday I went to see a kabuki show where the main play was the story of a man and his adopted blind son, the heart of the tale revolving around not how tragic it was that the boy was blind, but how wrong it was that he was rejected by his own parents and society. 

Then on Tuesday I woke up to learn that a man just outside Tokyo had killed 19 people, and injured many more, because he wanted to rid the world of disabled people, thinking society would be better if they all disappeared.   

The thing is, it does not shock me, or surprise me, or disappoint me that this happened in Japan. It saddens me that it happened at all. It deeply depresses me and disgusts me. However, it does not dampen my enthusiasm for engaging with how this culture approaches disability in a positive way, because I understand something that it seems like many abled Americans do not, judging from their comments. I understand that ableism is deeply rooted in the heart of the world. The entire world. In every society. No matter what it does “right”. 

I don’t think abled Americans understand this because I have seen comments where they easily detach themselves from this act of violence and hatred. I have seen them saying that compared to America, disabled people are much worse off in Japan. I have seen people “shocked”, saying this would never happen in the U.S. In a very twisted irony of ableism, I have seen people arguing that because mental health is so abysmally dealt with in Japanese society, it makes sense that this “insane” person would be able to get away with this “over there”. 

For those abled Americans who think this sort of thing - killing disabled people -wouldn’t happen in their society, I unfortunately have to inform you that it happens all the damn time. That the eugenics philosophy this man espoused before carrying out this crime was born in American society. That disabled people are being murdered in America at alarming frequency, in one way or another, and hardly anyone is noticing, much less caring.  

It was the anniversary of the ADA yesterday. This is probably the sort of thing abled people are thinking about when they think about America being better for the disabled. That type of legal protection that only came into existence twenty-six years ago and that still fails disabled Americans everyday. 

I have to tell you, its not a couple pages of a law that is poorly upheld, or how many handicapped parking spaces you become disgruntled by each day, that determines whether or not someone is going to think the world would be better without disabled people in it - or then take a knife to their throats while they sleep. That comes from a much deeper, much more ingrained sort of attitude that is as alive and well in the United States as it is anywhere else. This happened in Japan this time - but it could and does and has happened in the U.S. and each person needs to take responsibility for the factors, for the deeper ableism that is not bound by borders, that lead to these sorts of hate crimes. 

The United States does some things “right” regarding disability that Japan does not yet. Japan does some things “right” regarding disability that the United States does not yet. My interest in largely in the underlying attitudes and how that influences approaches. Both the U.S. and Japan are united by a worldwide ableism, that can take many different forms, but will ultimately result in violence against disabled people. All three of those reasons, the unique cultural perspectives and progressive steps that each country has to offer and the ableism everyone struggles against in both, is why I am so interested in opening a line of communication between the two. 

But when disabled people anywhere in the world are so hated as to result in their violent deaths, you cannot pass the buck as a cultural or societal problem that only they have. You have it, too. Your society, your cultural attitudes, your history. Trust me. It is rooted in the heart of the world. So these times of tragedy elsewhere are tragedy everywhere - and they are your time to take responsibility, too. 

“Mr. Chairman, let me begin with a profound remark: Two plus two equals four.

In other words, there is a logical and rational process called cause and effect. In terms of Newtonian physics, that means that every action causes an equal and opposite reaction. In other words, fellow members of the House, there are reasons why things happen, as controversial as that statement may be.

A farmer neglects to tend and care for his fields— it is likely that the crop will fail.

A company neglects to invest in research and development— it is likely that company will not be profitable.

In a similar way, a society which neglects, which oppresses and which disdains a very significant part of its population—which leaves them hungry, impoverished, unemployed, uneducated, and utterly without hope, will, through cause and effect, create a population which is bitter, which is angry, which is violent, and a society which is crime-ridden. That is the case in America, and it is the case in other countries throughout the world.

Mr. Chairman, how do we talk about the very serious crime problem in America without mentioning, without mentioning, that we have the highest rate of childhood poverty in the industrialized world, by far, with 22 percent of our children in poverty and 5 million kids hungry today?

Do you think maybe that might have some relationship to crime?

How do we talk about crime when this Congress is prepared, this year, to spend 11 times more for the military than for education; when 21% of our kids drop out of high school; when a recent study told us that twice as many young workers now earn poverty wages as 10 years ago; when the gap between the rich and the poor is growing wider, and when the rate of poverty continues to grow?

Do you think maybe that might have some relationship to crime?

Mr. Chairman, it is my firm belief that clearly, there are people in our society who are horribly violent, who are deeply sick and sociopathic, and clearly these people must be put behind bars in order to protect society from them.

But it is also my view that through the neglect of our government and through a grossly irrational set of priorities, we are dooming today tens of millions of young people to a future of bitterness, misery, hopelessness, drugs, crime, and violence. And Mr. Speaker, all the jails in the world, and we already imprison more people per capita than any other country, and all of the executions in the world… will not make that situation right.

We can either educate or electrocute. We can create meaningful jobs, rebuilding our society, or we can build more jails. Mr. Speaker, let us create a society of hope and compassion, not one of hate and vengeance. Thank you.

— 

Bernie Sanders , 1994 

 on the crime bill that has affected millions of poor POC. He predicted the disastrous effects of the bill and spoke fiercely against them. Who approved the bill? Bill Clinton. Who never spoke out against it, Hillary Clinton. This man is the real deal. He isn’t JUST talking about these issues to get elected. It’s his life’s work.  Get up and vote!

Mr. Speaker, let me begin with a profound remark: Two plus two equals four.

In other words, there is a logical and rational process called cause and effect. In terms of Newtonian physics, that means that every action causes an equal and opposite reaction. In other words, Mr. Speaker, there are reasons why things happen, as controversial as that statement may be.


A farmer neglects to tend and care for his fields—it is likely that the crop will fail.


A company neglects to invest in research and development—it is likely that the company will not be profitable.


In a similar way, Mr. Speaker, a society which neglects, which oppresses and which disdains a very significant part of its population—which leaves them hungry, impoverished, unemployed, uneducated, and utterly without hope, will, through cause and effect, create a population which is bitter, which is angry, which is violent, and a society which is crime-ridden. This is the case in America, and it is the case in countries throughout the world.


Mr. Speaker, how do we talk about the very serious crime problem in America without mentioning that we have the highest rate of childhood poverty in the industrialized world, by far, with 22 percent of our children in poverty and 5 million who are hungry today? Do the Members think maybe that might have some relationship to crime? How do we talk about crime when this Congress is prepared, this year, to spend 11 times more for the military than for education; when 21 percent of our kids drop out of high school; when a recent study told us that twice as many young workers now earn poverty wages as 10 years ago; when the gap between the rich and the poor is wider, and when the rate of poverty continues to grow? Do the members think that might have some relationship to crime?


Mr. Speaker, it is my firm belief that clearly, there are some people in our society who are horribly violent, who are deeply sick and sociopathic, and clearly these people must be put behind bars in order to protect society from them. But it is also my view that through the neglect of our Government and through a grossly irrational set of priorities, we are dooming tens of millions of young people to a future of bitterness, misery, hopelessness, drugs, crime, and violence. And Mr. Speaker, all the jails in the world, and we already imprison more people per capita than any other country, and all of the executions in the world, will not make that situation right. We can either educate or electrocute. We can create meaningful jobs, rebuilding our society, or we can build more jails. Mr. Speaker, let us create a society of hope and compassion, not one of hate and vengeance.

— 

Bernie Sanders, speaking in 1994 about Bill Clinton’s crime bill, which he voted for because it contained VAWA.

The Clinton campaign is saying he was for it back then and has flip-flopped. That’s more or less just untrue.