creoleness

The Founding Fathers...

Were often just as catty as any of the Real Housewives. They insulted and belittled each other constantly. Say what you will about polarization, but at least most politicians these days aren’t regularly accusing one another of sedition. We love to quote the founders but rarely do we recall John Adams accusing Alexander Hamilton of being “a creole bastard” who was colluding with the British. Honestly, the more you learn about the founders, the less impressive they seem.

Okay, Disney, I’ve had a bone to pick with you for a while

Where the hell is “Tiana’s Place”? Don’t get smart and say New Orleans, I mean for real. Why have you not made a Tiana’s Place at one of your parks?

I see no possible reason why you wouldn’t have built a restaurant like this yet. It’s cute, classy, and would be totally fun. You could serve creole food (as well as just plain american fair for the less adventurous.)

It would be pretty as hell inside

It would be fun for kids and adults, you could have dancing and a band playing. You could have a magician (bonus points if he’s dressed liked Facilier. Or train your Faciler face person to do short tarot card readings! Or get a mama Odi!)

The face characters could come in and out, but there’s always a set time Tiana and Naveen would be there (and if they aren’t you can say their in the kitchen cooking up a storm!) Jazz music! Lots of Jazz and swing. You could have workshops with Tiana for kids to learn stuff like the charleston, or cooking!

And then night or during the day a couple times a week you could have a second line (small New Orleans style jazz parade) with a brass band and Tiana and Naveen leading it, all the way to the restaurant.

And Oh my god, do you consider how many people would love a place like that to get married at the park! Having a wedding second line too? How fun that would be?

Disney, you are really missing out by not playing up the fact you have a character that opened their own restaurant (outside of Remi from Ratatouille but that’s another rant) and I’m really sick of The Princess and the Frog being among your more ignored movies. Put it at Epcot near the river or just anywhere! Heck, I know I stayed at a New Orleans style resort area of yours when I was like six! (Is that still around? I don’t remember what it was called, but there were Gator statues with instruments that would tie in really well…)

In conclusion

sacred-texts.com
Pow-Wows Index
Pow-Wows, or Long Lost Friend, by John George Hoffman, [1820], full text etext at sacred-texts.com

Written by a Pennsylvania Dutch healer in the 1820s, this book is a rambling collection of rural home remedies and folk invocations. Pow-wow is a unique creole of Christian theology and a shamanistic belief system. It is still practiced in some rural areas of Pennsylvania. In spite of the name, it is not of Native American derivation. It is believed to have been brought over to America by German immigrants who practiced folk-magic.

This little book includes healing spells, binding spells, protective spells, talismans, wards and benedictions. As for the home remedies, we don’t recommend you try any of them (e.g., if you have scurvy we suggest that you get some limes. And if your livestock are sick,

please

have a veterinarian look at them.) The text is also of historical interest, as it paints a vivid picture of the miseries of rural American life in the early nineteenth century. The original is very rare.

Some awesome folk magic of the Pennsylvania Dutch. 

Okay whoever called me a nigger can go die. For one. I’m proud to be creole, and Two I don’t need your shit you have been blocked.

Don't sleep on Haiti

Without Haiti, the US wouldn’t have WEB DuBois, James Audobon, Jelly Roll Morton, New Orleans Creole culture, zombie fiction, Basquiat,… and that’s only the beginning!

The Origin of Red Bones

‘Red Bone’, referring to an ethnic group in Louisiana and a black American term for people with fair skin, has strong ties to peoples in what is now eastern Nigeria. Originating from 18th century chattel slavery in the West Indies, the term ‘red bone’ takes from the creole term ‘red Ibo’ referring to fairer skinned black people. The term derived from observations of fair skin among some members of the Igbo ethnic group (and some other peoples lumped in from eastern Nigeria) whose numbers in slavery ratcheted up in the 18th century due to internal conflict in Igboland. European slavers and plantation owners often made observations and generalisations about various ethnic groups since different Africans were targeted for their knowledge, education and skills; a hefty amount of stereotyping and dehumanising was subsequently placed on various ethnic groups found in large numbers in slavery. One recurrent observation was the relatively higher prevalence of fair skinned people from the Igbo area, known then in the Atlantic as the ‘Eboe Country’. The fairer skin was demonised by planters as ‘sickly’ and the Igbo were characterised as weak because of this. This also meant their ‘price’ dropped and poorer planters in places like Virginia took many Igbo leading to a saturation of Igbo people there. The disdain, however, may have been fuelled somewhat by the fact that enslaved Igbo people weren’t unknown for their defiance of slavery, immortalised in the folktale of Ebo landing; they were also involved in a number of slave revolts all over the Caribbean, including in Haiti.

Ultimately, this characteristic was taken in as a negative one and the term ‘red’ was combined with ‘Ibo’ (Igbo) as a pejorative used by black people in the British West Indies for people who were black but with fair skin as opposed to mixed people who were just ‘red’ or ‘brown’ thus suggesting a hierarchy of phenotypes and hair types. Some creole linguists trace the term to Louisiana where it was heard as ‘reddy bone’, leading to the understanding of the term as ‘red bone’ with a less negative connotation as it is still used in AAVE today.

The term red bone is interesting as it seems to be a word that’s linked to a particular experience of an ethnic group in slavery. The word itself carries a lot of historical weight in terms of what it meant for one group of Africans in that era. (Kniffen, Gregory and Stokes 1987; Don C. Marler 1997, 2000; Winer (2009). Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago. pg. 754.; [Louisiana, Where Music is King, PBS.])

I’m pretty sure this is my first ever photograph of a family of four generations of women. Three of them speak French, Creole and English.

Boston, MA

Puerto Rican (Taino, African, Spanish) & Danish/Irish

@bmlambert9

Being mix can be a struggle at times when people want to label you as one thing. The issue I have with that is that when you are of a mixed ethnicity you have so much background, it is an insult for them to forget all of your heritage. I love to see mixed race people from all backgrounds celebrate their heritage on both sides. Having a sense of identity is important, and i suggest those who have trouble with this to seek out more about your own heritage; be proud!