creative mixing

100 Art Journal Materials.

1) Pressed flowers
2) Coloured Sand
3) Thin buttons
4) Embroidery thread
5) Second hand postcards
6) magazine clippings
7) Patches for mending clothes
8) Denim from old jeans
9) Pages of old books
10) Pressed insects
11) Newspaper articles
12) Calligraphy inks (more vibrant and transparent than water-color)
13) Paper bags
14) Envelops
15) Washi tape
16) Spray paint
17) Scrapbook paper
18) House paint (paint stores give away mistinted paint for extremely low prices, can confirm: I work at a paint store and get free paint every day.)
19) Colour chips (get these while you’re at the paint store :p)
20) Tin foil
21) Candle wax
22) Nail polish (if you pour it on the page and let it dry its beautifully shiny and textured. I use it to make eyes that glisten).
23) Oil pastels
24) Locks of your hair
25) Perfume samples
26) Resaraunt coasters
27) Gold leaf pen ( found at art stores)
28) Chalk
29) Black coffee
30) Postage stamps
31) Junk mail
32) Leaves
33) Dead butterflies and moths
34) Food lables
35) Coffee sleeves
36) Ribbon
37) Unused pages from previous journals/ notebooks.
38) Duct tape, patterned or otherwise.
39) Watercolor
40) Sharpie
41) Makeup (lipstick especially)
42) Lino Stamps (art stores sell ones you can carve yourself.)
43) Door numbers and letters (home depot has a whole wall of them).
44) Lables from a lable maker
45) Ticket stubs
46) Receipts
47) Resaraunt menus
48) Other people’s drawings
49) Baggage tags
50) Recipe cards
51) Pencil crayon
52) Regular crayon
53) Acrylic paint
54) Pressed mushrooms
55) Little plastic bags
56) Felt pen
57) Charcoal
58) Straw and dried grasses
59) Old school notes and assignments
60) Printed photographs
61) Business cards
62) Parcel packaging
63) Yarn or wool
64) Book marks
65) Stickers from Starbucks coffee bags (you can ask for these without buying the coffee)
66) Tea and tea bags
67) Spider webs
68) Snake skin (pet stores)
69) Scraps of fabric
70) Pet fur
71) Hair dye
72) Berry juice
73) Wood stain
74) Sawdust
75) Masking tape
76) Glitter
77) Notes from family members and loved ones
78) Beer and wine lables
79) Cellophane
80) Cardstock
81) Birthday cards
82) Oragami paper
83) Shoe laces
84) Dictionary entries
85) Plasticine
86) Melted Crayons
87) Chalk board paint and sidewalk chalk
88) Metallic foil
89) Coin rubbings
90) Wallpaper
91) Thin tile
92) Spray on velvet
93) Cue cards
94) Name tags
95) Invitations
96) Squished bottle caps
97) Paper doilies
98) Stencils
99) Dried herbs
100) The inside of correlated cardboard.

The Ultimate Winter Sunday Morning Brunch Guide

Words by Kristina S. // Photography by Juliette Bélanger.

My Sunday mornings are almost always dedicated to relaxing with a good book and preparing brunch for a great group of people – sometimes friends, sometimes family, and sometimes both. Here’s a brief guide to the ultimate winter Sunday morning brunch:

On a cold winter morning, there’s nothing more comforting than a warm cup of tea or coffee and hot food. So always start by serving a round of hot tea or coffee on a tray with various sweeteners, creamers, and milk.

While you’re enjoying your hot beverage, begin mixing the batter for a round of light and fluffy pancakes. It’s Sunday morning and you have all day to relax so get creative: mix some berries, nuts, or spices like cinnamon or nutmeg into the batter. Serve with butter, syrup, honey, and toppings, such as whipped cream, nuts, and fruit.

While you’re cooking the pancakes, fry up a few pieces of bacon, sausage, or both in another pan. Brunch is never complete without breakfast meats!

If pancakes don’t melt away your taste buds, try making a delicious egg scramble instead. You can get just as fancy with egg scrambles by adding various cheeses, veggies, and spices such as salt and pepper! Tip: add a splash of milk to the eggs before scrambling them in a skillet. The milk will increase the egg’s fluffiness, creating a delicious texture to chew on.

The best thing about brunch is that you’ll be full for hours so the mess you make in the kitchen will be well worth it. Enjoy your Sunday morning brunch and company!

Disclaimer: brunch is just as awesome completely on your own. If you don’t have any company to share with, no worries – all the more for you to enjoy.

Ten Art Journal Prompts to Improve Your Creativity.

These journal prompts are designed to train your creative ability. Art is a holistic study with several components. Each of these journal prompts isolates one of those components and explores its contributions to creative development.

1) Cut a photo out of a magazine and paste it on one side of your journal. On the other side, replicate the picture. (can be stylised) then, using sharpie or other bold marker, alter the original picture so it better looks like your drawing. This prompt highlights differences between reality and the way you interpret it.

2) String together nonsense words so that they roll perfectly off the tongue. Think ‘incoherent poetry’. Pay attention to syllables and rhyme. This prompt focuses on what language sounds like rather than what it communicates.

3) Dip various objects in paint and lay them across the page. Elastic bands, erasers, paper clips, combs, etc. This prompt experiments with texture and the effect of mixed media.

4) Draw a self portrait (from a mirror or photograph), and then choose a feature on your face. Draw another portrait from a different angle or with a different expression over top of the original that uses the original drawing of that feature. Can be done with animals if you’re not good at drawing people. This prompt highlights angle, pose, and position.

5) On black paper, use white pencil or pastel to draw something using only highlights. Paste this into your journal. On the opposite white page, draw the same thing using only shadows. This prompt pays attention to contrast and light source.

6) Create a list of the colours you assign to letters, numbers, musical notes, and people. Draw a few of these things in the colours you’ve listed. This prompt draws connections between how something looks and how something feels.

7) Swipe wet paint across the bottom of the page, turn the book and let the paint drip down the page. When it dries, create an image using the lines created by the drips. For example, the lines could be flower stems, could support words or letters, could be fence posts or tree trunks or telephone poles. This prompt asks you to incorporate an obstacle into your work.

8) Create a drawing using a felt-tip pen. Then, using water and a small paint brush, smear the lines of your drawing so that the shading becomes more like water-color. This prompt transforms the original media and requires pre-planning.

9) Using acrylic, paint something using only vertical lines. All forms in this painting must be suggested only by colour, as no outlines are permitted. This prompt teaches the importance colour when representing a form.

10) Cut words out of an old dictionary and paste them into your journal. Then, devise ways in which those words may be used that are not listed in the dictionary. Verbs are easiest. For example, the word 'stumble’ might be used to describe paper fluttering in the wind, or puffins in flight, despite not being defined in the dictionary that way. Write your new sentences beside the words.

To break in my new journal, I will be doing all of these prompts this week. If you do them, tag them 'artjournalprompts’ and I’ll reblog your work!

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Some mixed media canvases I’ve made in the past two months. (May/June ‘17)
1. “Playing in nature with you and all of my personalities is probably all love is”
2. “Little head slime dog is my god”
3. “Slimy Susan is gonna go for a dip”