creative art director

8

There once was a girl & boy who lived in Charolette Lane
The woman was gracious as ever
As she embraces her beauty
Her greatness in her skin
Her knots in the locs of her hair
She rides alongside her man
Seeing him
&
Seeing his reflection
She begins to stare at his soul
All of the hurt and all the pain
The universe moves faster
The air pushes faster
Brushes her away
God willing she wants to glide with him
But can’t leave her daunting past
As time knocks on her door ever single damn time like an overfull sock drawer
She wants to move
She wants to run with him
But she can’t because he must love the two of her
He must decide if he wants two of her not half
Slice a peer in half and give her one
But finish both and you have ate the seed of life
We join together as one but we live separate in the temple
He loves her just the way she is but finds faults in everything she does even though he loves her effortlessly
Your hair Is like a BRAIDED antenna touching the universe.
Your hair is made to fly
The best way to speak to God
We were created
We are one
We are love
We are one but separate in the temple a poem by Africancreature

Art & Creative Directors: @StevenOnoja
Photographer: @alherath
Models:
@Stevenonoja
@mominatu
Wardrobe Styling: @StevenOnoja
Hair: @africancreature
MUA: @lilymoralesmakeup

#StevenOnoja #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackMonth"

7

GUCCI PRE-FALL 2017: “SOUL SCENE” - creative director: Alessandro Michele - art director: Christopher Simmonds - photography: Glen Luchford - hair: Paul Hanlon - makeup: Yadim Carranza  - models: Nicole Atieno, Elibeidy, Bakay Diaby & Keiron Berton Caynes plus 25 professional dancers

  • “Inspired by the portraiture of Malian artist Malick Sidibé, who photographed local nightlife and youth culture in his hometown of Bamako, the campaign explores the freedom of expression found in music and dance. Set in dancehall and rich, colorful, make-shift studios, the images capture a group of men and women dancing passionately and posing for photographs. Referencing the spirit of England’s underground Northern Soul movement of the 60’s, with its distinctive, athletic dance moves and exuberant social scene, the images by Glen Luchford are dynamic, vibrant and spontaneous.” - Gucci

We artists have noticed something: communication with some of our clients (new and old) has not been very good, of late. While there are still many art directors, creative directors, and business owners who efficiently and effectively communicate with us, there are seemingly just as many who are in need of important tips on how to properly assign work or manage projects. Please note: I do not blame these individuals — not one bit; hiring artists for projects is not usually something you are taught in school, and there is no Communicating with Artists for Dummies book, as far as I know.

Therefore, here is a guideline that will lead to improved communication, fewer revisions, better artwork, and fewer headaches for all involved.

1. Your first email to an artist should not read: “Hey, are you available for a job?”

This kind of email is a waste of everybody’s time, because all of the important information is missing: description of the job, timeline, and budget. In order to reduce the back-and-forth between the individual requesting the creative work, and the artist, simply take a moment to include the important information in the initial email request. For example: “Dear Ms. Granger, we are publishing a story in our magazine about the ongoing conflict between hedgehogs and walruses. We will need a cover, a full page, and two spot illustrations. The deadline for sketches is March 1st, and the final artwork will be due March 8th. Our budget is $3750. Are you available / interested in working with us on this assignment? Please let me know by 5pm today. Thank you.”

With one email, you have now given the artist all of the info needed to decide whether or not to accept the job. As an illustrator, most of the emails I received ten years ago read just like the above. Lately, this has not been the case. I’m not sure what happened, but let’s fix that.

2. Please do not expect artists to read minds.

Details are very important. When sending emails about your job, give as many relevant details as possible to an artist, if the assigned artwork has specific requirements. Artists are great at solving creative problems, but we cannot guess what you are looking for if we are not told up front. For example, if you tell an illustrator to draw “a car on a street,” then the illustrator will assume the make and model of the car are not important. The illustrator will also assume the street can be any kind of street. Therefore, it is not fair to the artist to reject the final art because you expected a vintage Porsche on the Autobahn. Please be sure to communicate all required elements of the art in your earliest correspondence with your artist, and it will be smooth sailing for all.

If you tell an artist you need a mural of a vineyard painted on a wall in your restaurant, do not wait until the artist is half finished with a stunning, 20 foot scene with bright morning light casting cool shadows over the grapevines, to tell them that you need the time of day to be sunset. Not only is this a problem for your timeline, but the artist must be paid for all the changes that need to be made because the communication was not clear from the beginning.

Sometimes, you love the portfolio of a certain artist and you wish to give this person artistic freedom when commissioning a piece of work. Let us not confuse this wish for unbridled creativity with a lack of relevant information. For instance, the recent recipient of the Richard Gangel Art Director Award, SooJin Buzelli, is famous for giving her editorial artists a lot of freedom. But, when she assigns work, she actually has spent a good deal of time figuring out a way to distill a complex article down to its essential message or theme. She then sends this one or two sentence summary to a carefully selected illustrator, providing that individual with a perfect launchpad from which to create a unique visual solution. This is good communication. The artist comes away with enough information to be creative and daring without producing a piece of work that completely misses the mark.

3. Please Don’t Leave Us Hanging

This is just common courtesy. I often get asked if I am available for an illustration and I then respond in the affirmative with some questions about the assignment or the budget or some other detail. Then, no reply ever comes. A week later, I will see another artist blog about completing the very same assignment that was initially emailed to me. While I understand that everybody is very busy, and emails are flying around at the speed of light, I urge you to please remember that it is unprofessional and rude to simply leave an artist hanging. We often will put other things on hold or rework our weekly schedule to accommodate a project that we think is moving forward. A simple email to let us know that you will be working with somebody else, the job is cancelled, you need to consult with a coworker before moving forward, etc. is all we need to move on and stay on top of our other jobs. There is a popular misconception that artists are free spirits, day dreaming on a hillside and waiting for inspiration to strike, checking emails from paint smattered laptops touted around in burlap sacks … or whatever … but hey! Artists who make a living making art are working. They’re working all the time. Keeping an artist in the dark about the status of a project upsets their productivity in a major way. Please don’t do this.

I welcome comments. Please be polite. Thanks.

- Kyle T. Webster

6

Ruby Rails. 

I thought I’d do a post about the design of this little figure. I spent a lot of time  dreaming up what this character might look like and then designing it into a figure. Getting the freedom to design a black doll that had black features was a big part of why I loved this project. Often other ethnicities aren’t properly represented in toys because of costs, but this was a really important thing to all of us at Goldie Blox and getting to execute on that vision was phenomenal for minority like myself. 

It takes a lot of time and math to get these things right, and the involvement of many talented individuals. I was lucky to work with an the amazing toy director of Goldie Blox at the time Clint Cope, a great sculptor by the  name of Jason Loik and a very passionate hair designer by the name of Karyn Byrd from Natural Girls United.

I’ve detailed some of the steps that go into making these, but there are many more int he entire manufacturing process, the initial creative looks funner in a tumblr post though. It takes about a year to complete one of these so it’s a very long process, but very satisfying when you finally see it on the shelf. Needless to say I’m excited to see it out in the world! More to come on a lot of what I worked on and created at my time at Goldie Blox.

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GUCCI PRE-FALL 2017: “SOUL SCENE” - creative director: Alessandro Michele - art director: Christopher Simmonds - photography: Glen Luchford - hair: Paul Hanlon - makeup: Yadim Carranza  - models: Nicole Atieno, Elibeidy, Bakay Diaby & Keiron Berton Caynes plus 25 professional dancers

  • “Inspired by the portraiture of Malian artist Malick Sidibé, who photographed local nightlife and youth culture in his hometown of Bamako, the campaign explores the freedom of expression found in music and dance. Set in dancehall and rich, colorful, make-shift studios, the images capture a group of men and women dancing passionately and posing for photographs. Referencing the spirit of England’s underground Northern Soul movement of the 60’s, with its distinctive, athletic dance moves and exuberant social scene, the images by Glen Luchford are dynamic, vibrant and spontaneous.” - Gucci
2

Young Justice is going to be at SDCC this year!

From the official blurb:

FRIDAY JULY 21
10:00–11:00 a.m. Young Justice Q&A — Young Justice is back! Do not miss the show’s triumphant return to Comic-Con as series producers Greg Weisman, Brandon Vietti and key members of the creative team, including art director Phil Bourassa, will be on hand to answer your burning questions about the first two seasons of this beloved fan-favorite series and, if you’re lucky, you might learn a thing or two about the highly anticipated Young Justice: Outsiders. Room 6BCF

victoriajustice: Just an alien whose spaceship landed in the desert, looking for a certain music festival & a good time 👽🌵💕 Did this really cool photoshoot right before Coachella in Palm Springs. This art installation was created by @phillipksmith3 & is called “Circle of Land & Sky”. It’s part of the #desertx 2017 art project. 🙌🏼 Creative Director/Styling: @allantroy_ 📸: @bridger
Makeup: @iwantalexx
Hair: @mateo_sifuentes
Bodysuit: @deathbydollsofficial 👠: @privilegedshoes

March 15.2017 jiniinstagram(creative&art director,graphic Designer) IG Update of Leejongsuk 2017SS Sieg Fahrenheit

어떤 각도에서도 눈빛이 좋은🤔눈이 이쁜😍 #2017 SS #siegfahrenheit #이종석 #shooting #jiniwork #fashion #campaign #work #creative #director #진희하는일 #영상작업 #fashionfilm #잼있는일 #film #패션광고기획 #retouching #image #graphicdesign #seasonvisual #소중한작업 #경험쌓아남주나 #열정갖고 #더잘하자 #더많은경험 #좋은작업 _ 비하인드씬. 연출하지 않은 자연스러움도 화보가 되는👏👏 sketch P_ 김성웅 @woongsss

Cr: jiniinstagram

GUCCI PRE-FALL 2017: “SOUL SCENE” - creative director: Alessandro Michele - art director: Christopher Simmonds - photography: Glen Luchford - hair: Paul Hanlon - makeup: Yadim Carranza  - models: Nicole Atieno, Elibeidy, Bakay Diaby & Keiron Berton Caynes plus 25 professional dancers

  • “Inspired by the portraiture of Malian artist Malick Sidibé, who photographed local nightlife and youth culture in his hometown of Bamako, the campaign explores the freedom of expression found in music and dance. Set in dancehall and rich, colorful, make-shift studios, the images capture a group of men and women dancing passionately and posing for photographs. Referencing the spirit of England’s underground Northern Soul movement of the 60’s, with its distinctive, athletic dance moves and exuberant social scene, the images by Glen Luchford are dynamic, vibrant and spontaneous.” - Gucci
instagram

Part 2!! #Repost @tiltedtripod1 (@get_repost)
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Jaws 2 motion poster 💙💙💙💙
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.#jaws #jaws2 #shark #theocean #gregnicotero #horror #horrormovie #actor #photography #sfx #design #photomanipulation #fun #horrorart #graphicdesign#filmmaking #film #imagination #creative #art #director #surealism #collage #picture #animation #motionart @thedailyjaws @gnicotero

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