cranbrook academy

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Hannah Holliday Stewart was an American sculptor from Houston whose work often incorporated ancient myths and goddess imagery, depicting the woman as a dominant player in a new societal order. After graduating from the Cranbrook Academy of Art, she became a part of a generation of second-wave feminist artists and continued to produce sculptures, primarily in bronze, until her death in 2010. - Via: 1 | 2

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Kate Clark is an artist working in Brooklyn, New York. She received her BFA at Cornell University, and her MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art. Her first publications were in 2002, but she didn’t participate in an Exhibition until 2005.

Clark is primarily known as a sculptor who combines traditional taxidermy with sculpey modelling to create hybrid creatures that combine the familiarity with humanity with the discarded skins of animals hunted for sport. 

Upcoming Exhibitions:
“Kate Clark: Mysterious Presence” Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane, solo exhibition  Jan 20- April 10, 2016
“Dead Animals or The Curious Occurence of Taxidermy in Contemporary Art”, Davin Winton Bell Gallery, Brown University  January 23- March 27, 2016
“Something I Can Feel”, Volta NY, Curated by Derrick Adams March 2 – 6 at PIER 90

What I really like about Kate Clark’s work is the juxtaposition of life and death done with meticulous detail. Beauty is something that I typically find off putting and which generally makes me disengage in art but I love how how pretty the faces look. She uses the actual animal face for the skin but sculpts a face based on a model and then fits the animal skin over the face. It reminds me a bit of Island of Doctor Moreau but instead of looking monstrous, they look lovely and warm. I love work that disrupts expectations and having such beautiful faces on the carcasses of dead animals is jarring and morbid. I wish the faces looked more emotive, but I like it as is well enough. I like to imagine a sport hunter or poacher looking through the eyesight of their riffle and seeing these peaceful and beautiful faces before pulling the trigger.

Name: Tré Reising (@trereising)

Residence: Los Angeles

Featured Art Piece Names: “Iz U Rolling?” & “Gucci’s Cone”

Type of Art Medium: Sculpture. Hand-dyed burlap, .25" steel welded frame and hemp

How did you first hear Gucci Mane?: I feel like I must mention my dear friend Charles Fox turned me on to Gucci Mane in 2008… I know I got on late.  But I was completely obsessed. If it wasn’t for Charles I would never be making these objects.

The Story: For “Steele Gucci Cone,” Gucci got his face famous face tattoo right when I got accepted to graduate school at Cranbrook Academy of Art. I figured he has the iced out chain, now the tattoo of course, and that he need a sculpture made of BURRlap to match. I tried to sell it to him via Twitter and MTV for $200,000. While that miserably failed I managed to convince the back of the house manager at the Fillmore in Detroit to let me hang the sculpture in his backstage room before he arrived. He must of had problems getting to the show and was very late and I never got to meet him. The Fillmore staff said his camp loved the sculpture and put it in the back of a SUV and I have never seen or heard of it since. I’ve written him in jail with no response.

For “Iz U Rolling?” of course it was inspired by the song “Pillz.” This is a to scale enlarged window crank. The idea of the window crank is a pun on rolling, like when you are vibing in your car with the music on hammer and the car next to you has to roll up their window. I was also driving a POS truck where I had to manually roll down the driver side window  to open my door.

Gucci Mane song to describe each piece“Pillz (Bitch I Might Be)”  

Favorite Gucci Mane album artwork?:

Favorite Gucci Mane quote or line to describe your artistry?: “Quit being so emotional, get money”.

ELIEL SAARINEN, The Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, 1940. Bronze sculptures by Carl Milles, including The Mermaids & Tritons Fountain (1930) and the Europa and The Bull (1926/1935). / Flickr