craft printing

How to Print and Price your Stuff

The main example used here is posters (and other print items for simplicity sake), but I do mention other items and what I talk about here applies to pretty much all produced products (posters, mugs, key chains, bookmarks, comic books, etc.)

Here’s some advice based on my own experiences and research.

General Pricing:

8″x10″ posters are usually at least $10 and up. Posters Larger than that are usually at least $15 or $20 and up. 

For a larger poster $45 can be perfectly acceptable especially if the content is particularly fantastic or detailed.

The exact amount really depends on you, art level, size of poster, printing costs, printing method, etc. Don’t under price your art, but don’t expect to sell a lot of and 8″x10″ print for $50 a piece unless your art is really frickin’ spectacular.

[Original art (not a print, an original, like a physical painting or sculpture) are a different story. Original paintings and the like can go for larger amounts, but your only selling the individual painting once. This will focus more on production of multiple prints and copies.]

Selling Factors:

How do you plan on selling these? For physical copies, if you’re not going to be at a convention or booth, online there’s

Shipping cost

to consider. Will shipping be an added on cost or will the poster price be higher and shipping free? (If you’re doing free shipping make sure to put that where it’s well visible. People always like free.) Also make sure to account for overseas shipping which can be way pricier.

Also consider deals.
Buy 2 get 3rd 50% off can help encourage people to buy more and raise your sales, but you have to willing to sell your product for that price. Other deals that are common are Buy $X or more and get free shipping, Buy X# of products and get free commission doodle or bookmark or other little trinket (doodles can be requests that you post on your blog rather than physically ship), Buy full set for $50 (instead of the $60 it would cost to buy them all separately), and other things in this vein.

Production:

Are you going through a site where you never actually touch the product (ie. RedBubble) or are you handling all the printing and shipping yourself?

Online Sites and 3rd Party Vendors:
If your going through a site that handles all the production and shipping it can be good since it’s very hands off. On the payment side though here are some question you need to check:

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3

Papercraft Bison* with Headphones 

Pattern and Instructions now available

Materials

  • 4 sheets dark grey cardstock (65lb/176gsm)
  • 4 sheets brown cardstock (65lb/176gsm)
  • 2 sheets black cardstock (65lb/176gsm)
  • 2 sheets white cardstock (65lb/176gsm)
  • 1 sheet light grey cardstock (65lb/176gsm)
  • 4 paper brads
  • 4 ceramic magnets (optional)
  • Some corrugated cardboard
  • Some brown tissue paper
  • Glue
  • Mod Podge or other water-based varnish

Difficulty: ??? Probably not hard to figure out, but it takes a while. 

Link to download pdf of instructions and printable pattern laid out for US letter paper.

Please contact me if you run into problems and I will help troubleshoot. Please contact me if you need the svg files for a scrapbooking machine (I spent a lot of time optimizing the svg files for cr!cut’s frankly terrible ‘software’, and I’d love to know how it works on the other brands). Please contact me if you need the layout for a4 paper. Really, please just contact me. I will be over the moon if anyone tries to make this. If you make one, send me pictures! 

Some tags after the cut

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