cowins

I just want all the people in the world to know and understand that Bruce Wayne, the Batman, the terror of Gotham, the Dark Knight

let his son

keep a COW

IN THE BATCAVE

DAMIAN JUST FUCKING SHOWS UP WITH A COW

HIS NAME IS BATCOW

BRUCE DOESN’T EVEN FUCKING BLINK

OR TELL DAMIAN HE CAN’T KEEP A FUCKING C O W IN THE BATCAVE

THEY HAVE A COW

BRUCE WAYNE’S HOME FOR WAYWARD ORPHANS, REFORMED ASSASSINS, AND FUCKING BARNYARD ANIMALS

Unidentified Man on a Motorcycle, circa 1936. Gelatin silver print from the Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography.

This man is seated on an Indian Chief, a model that was introduced by the Indian Motocycle Company in 1920 (the spelling of Motocycle refers to a nineteenth-century horseless carriage and was used to distinguish the company from other motorcycle makers). This was one of the most popular bikes sold by the firm, which produced different variations of this model into the 1940s.

I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance. Sojourner Truth (1864). Albumen print carte-de-viste from the ICP’s Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), born Isabella Baumfree to a family of slaves in Ulster County, New York, escaped with her daughter in 1826, a year before New York state’s emancipation. After living in a commune, she converted to Christianity, changed her name in 1843, and became an itinerant preacher. The publication of the Narrative of Sojourner Truth, recorded in 1850 by her friend Olive Gilbert, and “Sojourner Truth: The Libyan Sibyl,” written by Harriet Beecher Stowe for the Atlantic Monthly in 1863, raised Truth’s national profile. She toured with abolitionists Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison and earned money from these speaking engagements as well as from the sale of images. As demonstrated by the inclusion of text on her cartes-de-visite, Truth actively controlled the dissemination of her image as a proper, educated, middle-class woman to support herself and her activist work. An ardent feminist, Truth often had herself represented proudly engaged in “women’s work,” such as knitting.

Unidentified Woman with Camera, circa 1935. Hand tinted gelatin silver print from the ICP’s Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography.

Probably intended as an advertisement for a photographer’s studio or for a new product, this large hand-colored portrait shows a female photographer holding a bulky Speed Graphic, the camera of choice for news photographers in the 1930s.

2

Hi i’m chiyo-csc :D from now on i’ll change my name into cowania, hope you guys will keep supporting me! 

idk just found it cool while saying Kingsmoo, since i have a cow obsession lol (i blame Hiromu Arakawa for this)

start from doodles from my textbook, i’ll try to create this Kingsmoo AU where the Kingsmoo protect citizens from free milk from Richcow Valentine which contains micro chips will control the mind of people who drink it

FREE MILK

FREE COWS

FOR EVERYONE

FOREVER

i’m so not sorry just ignore me, i’ll do the whole cast but only Eggsy Cowin for now

10

Several pages from a family photo album (ca. 1900 to 1940), part of the ICP’s Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography.

This image of the Tuskegee class of 1910 is pasted into a family album containing photographs ranging in date from ca. 1900 to 1940.

2

“Dress Rehearsal” (1936) by James VanDerZee. Gelatin silver print from the ICP’s Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography.

On the verso of this portrait of a man in Shakespearean costume is the name Walter B. Smith and an address in Harlem on West 119th Street. Smith may have been a member of one of the Negro Repertory Companies, or “Negro Units,” of the Federal Theatre Project, which was very active in Harlem in the 1930s.

anonymous asked:

Can female cows have horns? And if so, how can you tell the difference between females and males? Thanks!

Female cows can most definitely have horns! They actually have them about as often as bulls. Whether or not cattle have horns is based more on the breed than the gender of the animal which makes telling a cow (female) from a bull (male) pretty tricky when all you have to go on is the skull. Unfortunately there aren’t any real surefire ways to tell them apart but there are a few little clues you can look for to help with sexing the skull.

Pictured here on the left is the hornless skull from what was most likely a young bull and on the right is the skull from what was confirmed to have been an old cow with horns.

I say the hornless skull was most likely from a young bull because it has quite a knob of bone growth on its head which is something I’ve read that you usually see in young bulls before the individual bone plates of their skull finish widening and flattening out as they mature. But other than that, there’s really not a big difference between the skulls.

Side views: Young Bull

Old Cow

In most other animals, the males will typically have a much more robust and larger skull that the female. Their skulls will be wider across the forehead between the eyes and all of the bone will be denser and heavier than that of a female animal. Now all cattle are pretty heavy and big-boned so the sexual dimorphism you’ll find in their bones will be quite minor and in most cases practically indifferential but sometimes you can spot some subtle differences.

This young bull does have a broader head for its size than the old cow. And even though it is a skull from a fairly young animal—and young animals usually have much thinner, more fragile bones—it is still a very heavy, dense skull.

Other than that, there really isn’t a lot you can go on when sexing cattle skulls unfortunately. Especially when you start taking into account the numerous different breeds and their variety of shapes and sizes which can sometimes throw a kink into trying to sort the gender of the animal out. But typically, just go on how broad it is between the eyes and how heavy the skull is and make your best guess based on that.

I’ve found it’s actually a lot easier to tell a bull from a cow by looking at the pelvis if you have it! Cows are like female humans and have much wider pelvises than the males do to allow for giving birth.

Hope that helps, Anon!