court and hudson

The Final Problem: The Message from Miss Hudson to Mycroft Holmes, 1996

Twenty years ago, Sherlock Holmes spent the summer in America. While he was there a grisly double-murder caused the local law enforcement great trouble. They couldn’t convict the man – he was about to walk free.  This was, of course, until Sherlock Holmes offered his deductions and testified in court. Frank Hudson, ruthless criminal, philanderer, and drug dealer, was sentenced to death.  His wife, Martha Hudson, with whom he had no children, was relieved to finally spring free from his dangerous web. However, there was one person Sherlock did not mean to cross – Frank Hudson’s daughter from another woman. This woman vowed from that day on, if ever Sherlock Holmes were to fall in love, that she would be there to take that all away from him, to take what he took from her. She, from wealth and power funded from that cartel until Sherlock left her “penniless and abandoned” (TAB), sent a message to Mycroft Holmes. The message read as follows:

“From this moment on, Sherlock Holmes has made an enemy of me. I will be in your orbit for the rest of my life. I will take from him what he took from me. You will alert me as soon as he falls in love. The code word is "Love”. Once I hear the word, I will abandon my work to start anew. If you do not do exactly as I say, millions of British citizens will die. I have consulted James Moriarty, to keep an eye on your brother until I am notified. He is a fan of his work and will be watching every online blog, every news outlet for information on his well-being. If I find out Sherlock has fallen in love from him and not from you, millions of people will die.”

I present to you Miss Morstan, who suffered greatly at the loss of her father in The Sign of Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In this version, she is Miss Hudson.

There is a letter game running through BBC Sherlock. Thank you @teaandforeshadowing for pointing me to this official Sherlock Youtube channel clue.

Miss Hudson, who has reached out to various people in her attempt to take down Sherlock Holmes, has her minions coded in vowels. AEIOUY – These represent four people in her web. Let’s start with “A”:

This is Janine Hawkins. Her last name changed to “Donlevy” in The Abominable Bride. Keep in mind she is one of the monstrous regiment Mary leads Sherlock to in the crypt. 

“Donlevy” is a callback to Laurie King’s Novel “The Beekeeper’s Apprentice” where Sherlock Holmes solves a mystery at Sussex Downs involving Patricia Donleavy, Moriarty’s relation. 

It is important to note that Janine’s last name is missing the “A” – just like the newspaper clipping Sherlock saw floating past his head in The Abominable Bride. The clip read “Body of Sea Captin Found in Chapel”. Again, missing the “A”. Arwel Jones, the television show’s production designer sent cryptic tweets with the letter “A” mysteriously capitalized in the middle of a word. This is because they’re playing a letter game. 

This is “E”:

Mary Morstan found out about her and “Redbeard” when she threatened Magnussen at CAM Tower. She wasn’t there just to kill him. She wanted more. 

This is I, O, and U:

Here you can hear Sherlock saying “IOU” to himself and Molly enters the shot. She asks him about it. He doesn’t answer. Keep in mind Molly – along with Janine – was one of the women who haunted Sir Eustace in The Abominable Bride. She was the one who killed him, actually. I think she’ll be used more against her will in episode 3, but it’s important to note she will be manipulated in the grand, villainous scheme. 

And, last but not least, we have “Y”:

See the “Y” in blood on his lips? Yep. He’s the consulting criminal that’s helped make this all a reality. He’ll be back in The Final Problem to ask Sherlock “Is this silly enough for you yet? Gothic enough?” – but these questions will be to the audience, as well, seeing series four has been very, very wonky so far. Too dramatic. That’s because we’re rewatching “The Abominable Bride”. He’ll tell Sherlock “It’s not real”. This should be the moment we become grounded in reality – or at least right after. At this moment we’ll be told just why this whole series has been so hard to follow. Patience, patience, everyone. We’re not even to the good part yet. 

Do you know why “Staying Alive” was always a problem for Moriarty? Because it was in his contract to not kill Sherlock even though it would be fun. Miss Hudson never allowed for that. 

Why do you think Mrs. Hudson gave Sherlock a “special deal”? Mycroft, who’s been aware of this impending problem for years, asked her to “look after him…. please”. She has always been a mirror for John – knowing this it’s easy to see Mycroft went to her, too. Mycroft has been playing chess, putting his pieces in position without anyone knowing.

He tried everything he could to make sure Sherlock never fell in love. It was for everyone’s good. Caring is not an advantage. 

Mycroft upgrades their surveillance status immediately as this happens:

And then he gave the codeword “Love” to Miss Hudson to let her know the game is on, so she dropped everything, betrayed her group, and left. 

In The Final Problem we’ll see “Mary” still alive, Moriarty back from the “dead”, our wonky perception disappear, and a monstrous regiment of women (AEIOU) wait to take Sherlock down. Remember, we’re watching The Abominable Bride again. Mary will jump out of the shadows at the last moment, alarming John and tipping off Sherlock of the long game. 

But you’re wondering about Mycroft, about the government? No, those players don’t matter. Moriarty had to distract Mycroft and Sherlock in order for Miss Hudson’s pieces to better close in. Too busy solving the bomb under parliament? Mary inched closer. Too busy solving the Mayfly Man? Mary inched closer. Too busy getting to Magnussen? Mary inched closer. 

You want this to be some epic Moriarty/Government showdown? It won’t be. This is about love and revenge. Simple. Pedestrian. Tedious. 

But this is a love story, after all. 

Keep reading

More than a week after the body of Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam was found floating in the Hudson River, the police in New York City were still piecing together her last moments, trying to determine how her life came to an end.

The night before her body was discovered, video cameras recorded Judge Abdus-Salaam, a widely respected New York State Court of Appeals jurist, walking around for hours in Riverbank State Park in Upper Manhattan, according to several people briefed on the investigation into her death.

Surveillance footage shows the judge leaving her home in Harlem on the evening of April 11, wearing the same clothes that she wore when she was found the next day, according to the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a continuing investigation. Judge Abdus-Salaam then made her way to the park; the cameras last captured her standing near the water’s edge.

The medical examiner’s office has not made a determination on what caused the death of Judge Abdus-Salaam, who was the first black woman to serve on the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court. Her body was found on the afternoon of April 12 in shallow water along the shore of the Hudson River near West 132nd Street.

This week, a police spokesman said that the judge’s death was being deemed as “suspicious,” a characterization that applies to cases in which the circumstances have not been clearly established.

But after nine days of investigation, detectives and police officials were still leaning toward the conclusion that Judge Abdus-Salaam, 65, took her own life, although some questions remained unanswered, three people briefed on the inquiry said on Friday. Perhaps foremost among them is why the judge might have committed suicide.

An autopsy uncovered bruises on the judge’s neck, and found water in her lungs, suggesting that she was alive when she went into the river, a police official said. One possibility, the official said, was that she had been choked sometime — even days earlier — before going into the river.

Investigators indicated it was possible the marks could stem from bruising incurred during her body’s retrieval.

In a statement issued on Wednesday, the judge’s husband, the Rev. Canon Gregory A. Jacobs, an Episcopal priest in Newark, pushed back against the idea that his wife had committed suicide.

“Some media outlets and others have conjectured that Sheila was the victim of a ‘probable suicide,’” the statement said. “These reports have frequently included unsubstantiated comments concerning my wife’s possible mental and emotional state of mind at the time of her death. Those of us who loved Sheila and knew her well do not believe that these unfounded conclusions have any basis in reality.”

More than a week after the body of Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam was found floating in the Hudson River, the police in New York City were still piecing together her last moments, trying to determine how her life came to an end.

The night before her body was discovered, video cameras recorded Judge Abdus-Salaam, a widely respected New York State Court of Appeals jurist, walking around for hours in Riverbank State Park in Upper Manhattan, according to several people briefed on the investigation into her death.

Surveillance footage shows the judge leaving her home in Harlem on the evening of April 11, wearing the same clothes that she wore when she was found the next day, according to the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a continuing investigation. Judge Abdus-Salaam then made her way to the park; the cameras last captured her standing near the water’s edge.

The medical examiner’s office has not made a determination on what caused the death of Judge Abdus-Salaam, who was the first black woman to serve on the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court. Her body was found on the afternoon of April 12 in shallow water along the shore of the Hudson River near West 132nd Street.


This week, a police spokesman said that the judge’s death was being deemed as “suspicious,” a characterization that applies to cases in which the circumstances have not been clearly established.

But after nine days of investigation, detectives and police officials were still leaning toward the conclusion that Judge Abdus-Salaam, 65, took her own life, although some questions remained unanswered, three people briefed on the inquiry said on Friday. Perhaps foremost among them is why the judge might have committed suicide.

An autopsy uncovered bruises on the judge’s neck, and found water in her lungs, suggesting that she was alive when she went into the river, a police official said. One possibility, the official said, was that she had been choked sometime — even days earlier — before going into the river.

Investigators indicated it was possible the marks could stem from bruising incurred during her body’s retrieval.

In a statement issued on Wednesday, the judge’s husband, the Rev. Canon Gregory A. Jacobs, an Episcopal priest in Newark, pushed back against the idea that his wife had committed suicide.

“Some media outlets and others have conjectured that Sheila was the victim of a ‘probable suicide,’” the statement said. “These reports have frequently included unsubstantiated comments concerning my wife’s possible mental and emotional state of mind at the time of her death. Those of us who loved Sheila and knew her well do not believe that these unfounded conclusions have any basis in reality.”


In the absence of any conclusive evidence, the statement said, the family believed “such speculations to be unwarranted and irresponsible.”

Mr. Jacobs also said the family was thankful for the Police Department’s efforts and said they were praying that “the facts will ultimately be made known.”

Many of the judge’s friends and colleagues said they could not believe that she had killed herself. Other close friends, however, suggested she may have struggled with the pressure that came with a heavy caseload and other responsibilities, such as her speaking engagements.

The anniversaries of the deaths of the judge’s mother and brother around the Easter holiday also could have been stressors. Two law enforcement officials with knowledge of the investigation into the judge’s death had initially said that both deaths had been suicides.

But Judge Abdus-Salaam’s family said in a statement on Wednesday that her mother, who died in 2012 at the age of 92, did not commit suicide. The judge’s younger brother, the statement said, “lost his battle with terminal lung cancer” in 2014.

Law enforcement officials acknowledged on Friday that they had erroneous information regarding the death of the judge’s mother.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/21/nyregion/appeals-court-judge-death-hudson-river.html?
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I just learned a trans woman is being sentenced to incarceration in a men’s prison in my area.

There’s a petition. Web petitions are totally worthless but still sign it if you’ve got a moment: https://www.change.org/p/bath-magistrates-court-allow-transgender-woman-tara-hudson-to-serve-her-prison-sentence-in-a-female-prison

Like this is an obvious sign that we need to get organized here and create some actually effective resistance. Though the trans women I’ve met in Somerset are usually older and wealthier and more conservative, I can’t get out the house most days, so finding people working to help incarcerated trans women here seems pretty fucking hopeless.

I know there are organisations against prisons and in support of lgbt+ prisoners here in the UK. It’s well past time I got in touch and gave them what support I can, if only writing letters to trans prisoners. But, fucking. Fuck. It’s happening right here! Like, this isn’t remote - if I had my shit together I could help incarcerated trans women and I don’t. Yet.

(This is all properly capitalised because I am typing on my phone which ironically makes it look like I’m putting more effort in and feeling less emotional.)