cour royale

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→ This princess, as virtuous as she was amiable, whom monsters later on accused of having never loved her husband, was absolutely in despair. As soon as she heard the King’s carriage entering the Cour Royale she ran towards him holding the Dauphin in her arms, then breathless and almost fainting she fell into those of the King who was no less moved than she was. Holding out one hand to his children who covered it with kisses, with the other wiping the tears from the eyes of Marie-Antoinette and Madame Elisabeth, Louis XVI smiled again…he kept on repeating: “Happily no blood was shed, and I swear that not a drop of French blood will ever be shed on my orders.”

~ Histoire de la Revolution Francaise (3 vol.) by M.H. Lemaire, 1816

daintyhippie-deactivated2015071  asked:

Did Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette love each other? What do you think of Marie's relationship with Count Fersen?

Well first off, I apologize if this gets long.  (Which it will)

Did they love one another? Absolutely. There is no doubt whatsoever that Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette grew to love one another very much. Yes I say grew to because it did not start out that way. They had a typical arranged marriage, and Louis was brought up to abhor anything Austrian. They didn’t have that romantic love at first sight sort of story, but I think it makes it all the sweeter that their love developed over time.

I love this line from a post someone else made, where they said

Louis was basically the ancien regime-equivalent of the nerdy loner in the science club who somehow ended up dating the prom queen and never recovered from the shock.

It just seems so fitting, as yes they were complete and utter opposites but they loved one another nonetheless. Louis XVI was infamous for the fact that, unlike his predecessors (And indeed his own brothers) he NEVER took a mistress. It was practically unheard of for the King of France not to have a mistress, but he remained devoted to her and her alone.

Here’s some quotes from various sources I thought might help prove my point:

In obvious ways they were strikingly different: Louis beginning to put on weight, Antoinette slim; he steady, she quick; he reserved, she open; he with few close friends, she with many; he awkward, she majestic; he seeing the dark side, she the bright; he a keen reader, she bored by books; he unmusical, she happy with harp and clavichord.

But at a deeper level they possessed traits in common. Both had a lot of heart: they felt for those less fortunate than themselves, they loved their children and were happiest when with them. Both had a sense of duty and wanted above everything to do their job well.

Louis and Antoinette - Vincent Cronin

[Marie Antoinette] ran to [her husband,] threw her arms round his neck and hugging him tenderly, told him: “I feel, my dear husband, that I love you more each day. Your honesty and frankness charm me; the more I compare you with the others [note: his brothers] the more I know how much more you are worth.”

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 19 December 1771.

… [Louis XVI] spoke to his august consort in an infinitely cordial and tender manner, saying among other things that he loved her with all his heart and that he could swear to her he had never had the least feeling or sentiment for any woman, but for her alone.

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 17 June 1779

… kissing Mme la Dauphine, he said to her, “But do you love me?”

[She] answered, “Yes, you cannot doubt it, I love you sincerely and respect you even more.”

The young prince seemed very moved by these words; he caressed Mme la Dauphine most tenderly…

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 12 November 1773

This princess, as virtuous as she was amiable, whom monsters later on accused of having never loved her husband, was absolutely in despair. As soon as she heard the King’s carriage entering the Cour Royale she ran towards him holding the Dauphin in her arms, then breathless and almost fainting she fell into those of the King who was no less moved than she was. Holding out one hand to his children who covered it with kisses, with the other wiping the tears from the eyes of Marie-Antoinette and Madame Elisabeth, Louis XVI smiled again…he kept on repeating: “Happily no blood was shed, and I swear that not a drop of French blood will ever be shed on my orders.”
Histoire de la Revolution Francaise (3 vol.) by M.H. Lemaire, 1816

“In fact the King did not get the measles and he did miss the Queen; their relationship became noticeably deeper following the birth of their child. Finding three weeks too long to be apart, Louis XVI made his own romantic gesture. He stood for a quarter of an hour in a private courtyard of the Petit Trianon while the Queen leant out of a window. No one else was allowed to be present at this touching encounter but it was learned afterwards that tender words had been exchanged on both sides.

Marie Antoinette - The Journey

On the morning of his execution, Louis XVI removed his wedding ring and handed it to his valet, Jean-Baptiste Cléry, saying:

[Give] this ring to the queen; tell her that I part from it with pain and only at the last moment.

I could add more but I think that’s sufficient enough.

As for the Fersen question, HERE are some posts by the lovely Elena Maria Vidal that sum it up much more eloquently than I could. To quote the beginning of them:

Too often in the many articles about Marie-Antoinette that have surfaced in the last year due to the Coppola film, Count Axel von Fersen is referred to as the "queen’s lover” or as her “probable lover.” It is repeatedly disregarded that there is not a scrap of reliable historical evidence that Count Fersen and Marie-Antoinette were anything but friends, and that he was as much her husband’s friend as he was hers.

I can see why people are attracted to the idea of Fersen. He’s the dashing, romantic Swedish hero and people want to think that Antoinette found true love and happiness with him despite her tragic life. Well she DID find true love and happiness in her life, but it wasn’t with Fersen. It was with her husband, whom she loved more than anyone else and whom she stuck by until the end.

This princess, as virtuous as she was amiable, whom monsters later on accused of having never loved her husband, was absolutely in despair. As soon as she heard the King’s carriage entering the Cour Royale she ran towards him holding the Dauphin in her arms, then breathless and almost fainting she fell into those of the King who was no less moved than she was. Holding out one hand to his children who covered it with kisses, with the other wiping the tears from the eyes of Marie-Antoinette and Madame Elisabeth, Louis XVI smiled again…he kept on repeating: “Happily no blood was shed, and I swear that not a drop of French blood will ever be shed on my orders.”

Histoire de la Revolution Francaise (3 vol.) by M.H. Lemaire, 1816

LES LIAISONS DE MARIE ANTOINETTE | APPARTEMENT DU ROI | The vestibule is paneled in marble and lighted by two windows that opened onto the cour royale. In 1701, in order to provide more light to the staircase, the south wall opposite the windows was opened, thus creating a loggia from the vestibule. | Reference : Félibien, André (1694). La description du château de Versailles, de ses peintures, et des autres ouvrags fait pour le roy. Paris: Antoine Vilette.

After the storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789Louis XVI went to Paris to reconcile with his subjects. Marie-Antoinette dreaded that he would be killed. When he returned safely, a contemporary writer, Lemaire, described her reaction:

This princess, as virtuous as she was amiable, whom monsters later on accused of having never loved her husband, was absolutely in despair. As soon as she heard the King’s carriage entering the Cour Royale she ran towards him holding the Dauphin in her arms, then breathless and almost fainting she fell into those of the King who was no less moved than she was. Holding out one hand to his children who covered it with kisses, with the other wiping the tears from the eyes of Marie-Antoinette and Madame Elisabeth, Louis XVI smiled again…he kept on repeating: “Happily no blood was shed, and I swear that not a drop of French blood will ever be shed on my orders.”
Histoire de la Revolution Francaise (3 vol.) by M.H. Lemaire, 1816

Source from this fabulous blog : http://teaattrianon.blogspot.fr/2008/04/marie-antoinettes-love-for-louis-xvi.html