countries who love the united states

8

Dark times all around but there are still people out there who love you

Do not hurt yourself, do not hurt others, get help, talk to someone, anyone. Humanity has survived before and we can do it now if we all just support each other. My country and my people let me down and endangered my life but there’s nothing I or anyone else can do about that so let’s try to spread the love that is so clearly lacking.

Trump has just announced Muslim Ban 3.0. It is FAR, FAR worse than the versions that came before it.

Muslim Ban 3.0 bans ALL IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, Chad and North Korea, in addition to ALL VISITORS OF ANY KIND.

That means NO ONE from these countries will be allowed to get visas in to the United States anymore - not tourists, not businesspeople, not family reunions, not anything. The only exception is students from Iran (F, M, and J visas) - students from all the other countries are banned.

This means that Iranian-Americans are now completely cut off from our families inside of Iran, who are now forbidden from visiting.

This means Americans of Syrian, Somali, Libyan, Chadian, and Yemeni heritage are now cut off from family, friends, neighbors, loved ones.

This means no weddings, no funerals, no visits to grandma and grandpa, no seeing cousins, no nothing. There is no exemptions for family.

And this is INDEFINITE. Unlike the previous versions which were 90 days each and had to be renewed, this is FOREVER.

Imagine the families broken up, the lives torn apart, the connections shattered. The people caught in the middle.

My heart is broken. We must resist. There are no other options.

The impact of the President’s words this morning go far beyond what can fit in a 140-character tweet. It’s about real American families who have made the ultimate sacrifice to our country. It’s about transgender veterans like Sherri Swokowski, who served for 34 years in the United States Army and retired as a Colonel, being told that her decades of service was a “disruption.” It’s about the transgender soldiers who are waking up this morning on the other side of the world - thousands of miles from their home and the people the love - reading a message from their Commander in Chief that their service to our country is a burden. Reblog – and TAKE ACTION by telling Trump to STOP attacking transgender servicemembers.

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NEW VIDEO: “A Matter of Life or Death: LGBTQ+ Refugees”: Being LGBTQ+ in the United States can definitely be difficult, but in some countries around the world you can go to jail or even be killed if you are out of the closet. For part 5 of my Pride Month series, “Chosen Family: Stories of Queer Resilience,” I met two incredible members of our community, Shadi (from Syria) and Sharifa (from Uganda) who went to incredible lengths to flee their home countries to avoid persecution. You’ll love them.

Systematic racism will be the downfall of US Soccer. (and YES I am including the Women’s National Team too

In contrast to other countries, soccer in the United States caters itself towards white, suburban, upper-middle class kids. Premier clubs and other expenses have single-handedly priced out those in lower-income neighborhoods. Can you imagine how many Messis or Martas we lose annually, just because of the pay-to-play structure of youth soccer? Immigrant families, who come to the United States bearing an avid love for the game, are unable to pursue their dreams due to the outrageous costs. (X

American soccer players come from places where incomes, education and employment rankings, are whiter than the US average, while the basketball and football players came from places that ranked lower than average on those same indicators. (X)

In regards to the United States Women’s National Team…the success of our team is indisputable. But ask yourself this, how much longer do you think we’ll be able to maintain our dominance if we continue to ignore lower- income, or, dare-I-say, minority athletes? Just take a look at USMNT for the answer on that one.  

What to read after Throne of Glass

If you, like me, are still going through complete Sarah J Maas withdrawal, and can’t really stand to wait for her next books, check out the list below to tide you over! Each book has many of the things I adored about both ToG and ACOMAF: strong and interesting female characters, magic, deeply beautiful writing, love stories to cry about, and an all around sense of adventure. If you have any more recommendations to add, definitely let me know!

Black Jewels: Anne Bishop

I just finished this series, and I am still amazed by how masterfully Anne Bishop weaves her stories. Welcome to the Dark Kingdom, a matriarchal realm ruled by strong queens and the males that support and serve them (Rowan and Aedion anyone?). There is a prophecy fortelling the rise of a Queen with more power than even the High Lord of Hell himself, which gives us a wonderful story full of scheming, war, adventure, and a badass court I would kill to be a part of. Prepare your heart!

Graceling by Kristian Cashore

Graceling is the best series for all you folks who couldn’t get enough of badass assassin Celaena. Katsa is an assassin Celaena would be proud of, due to her rare ability as a Graceling. She is Graced with a killing power, and has spent her life as the king’s tool in doling out his reign of terror. In waltzes Po, Graced with fighting, and here to shake everything Katsa knows about her world. Cashore definitely gives us a twist Sarah would most certainly support!

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski

This book aligns more with the romance and court mystique that Sarah presents so wonderfully in ToG and ACOMAF. Kestrel is the daughter of a general who helped the emperor conquer territory after territory. As she is faced with a choice, marry or join the military, Kestrel finds a friend in one of the slaves from the conquered people, and so begins one of the most interesting political schemes I have read in awhile! I haven’t finished the trilogy yet, because I am out of the country and can’t get my hands on the final book, but I would highly recommend it.

Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson

Cue another really cool empire written by an author who isn’t afraid to be inventive or go beyond the normal realms of fantasy. Vin is another Celaena-esque character, as the abandoned street child who turned thief who struggles to stay alive. When a mentor takes her under his wing, she discovers that her luck on the streets might be more than she could ever explain. Magic, mystery, and of course, a few court balls thrown in make for a wonderful mix. Warning: the last book made me cry. Like really cry. But in a good, I’m-still-mad-at-you-but-I-understand-and-respect-your-story-line type of way.

Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima

Raisa is everything that I have ever wanted in a princess. She is intelligent, passionate, feisty, and super compassionate. So when a war arises between the clans and the wizards, you can bet she has goals to achieve and empires to shake up. Throw Han Alister into the mix, a street wise leader, and things get tricky and fireworks explode. One of my favorite love stories in a long time, because it isn’t a story about just romantic love, but also what the love of a princess for her country can do. 

Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder

Yelena is set for execution for murder, but is given the choice to be the next food taster of the Commander of Ixia. As if the threat of having poison in her system wasn’t enough, she is also given a dose of Butterfly’s Dust, which she needs every day to stay alive, and can of course only get from the chief of security. Fighting for her life soon becomes more than just guessing the right poison, but also a game of magic, love, and all out war. Best kind of combo out there!

Legend by Marie Lu

This is the only book in the list to be set in a dystopian universe as opposed to a kingdom, but with a prodigy like June, no one can make any complaints. After a war tore the country apart, the Western United States is under the martial rule of the Republic, and June is their perfectly groomed soldier golden child. Day, on the other hand, is a slums boy who has become the Republic’s most wanted criminal. What happens when their paths cross is enough to make any country tremble, and to keep me hanging on to every word!

And finally:

Literally anything by Tamora Pierce!

Tamora Pierce has been my favorite author since I was a little girl. Each of her series is set in the same universe, based around the story of an interesting and kickass female character, from the first female warrior to a wild-mage. I first found these stories when my mother decided my sister and I didn’t have enough strong women in our literature and Tamora really rose to the occasion. Start with the first series, Song of the Lioness, and work your way from there! I have reread her books at least once every year since I was a little girl and they get better every time. I cannot recommend these books enough!


If you read or have read any of these books, feel free to shoot me a message; I am always ready to geek out over them. 

5

Most people think I was named for the state, but it’s not true. I was named for a battle ship. The U.S.S. Arizona. My grandfather was serving on the Arizona when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, and he saved 19 men before he drowned. Pretty much everything my father did his whole life was about honoring that sacrifice. I was raised to be a good man in a storm. Raised me to love my country. To love my family. To protect the things I love. When my father - Colonel Daniel Robbins, the United States Marine Corp - heard that I was a lesbian, he said he had only one question. I was prepared for, “How fast can you get the hell out of my house?” But instead, it was, “Are you still who I raised you to be?” My father believed in country the way that you believe in God. And my father is not a man who bends, but he bent for me because I’m his daughter. I’m a good man in a storm. I love your daughter. And I protect the things that I love. Not that I need to. She doesn’t need it. She’s strong, and caring, and honorable. She’s who you raised her to be.

An open letter to the NFL players:

           You probably    graduated high school in 2011.  Your teenage years were a    struggle.  You grew up on the wrong side of the tracks..  Your    mother was the leader of the family and worked tirelessly to keep a roof    over your head and food on your plate.  Academics were a struggle for    you and your grades were mediocre at best. The only thing that made you    stand out is you weighed 225 lbs and could run 40 yards in 4.2 seconds while    carrying a football.   Your best friend was just like you, except    he didn’t play football.  Instead of going to football practice after    school, he went to work at McDonalds for minimum wage.  You were    recruited by all the big colleges and spent every weekend of your senior    year making visits to universities where coaches and boosters tried to    convince you their school was best.  They laid out the red carpet for    you. Your best friend worked double shifts at Mickey D’s.  College was    not an option for him.  On the day you signed with Big State University    , your best friend signed paperwork with his Army recruiter.  You went    to summer workouts.  He went to basic training.                You spent the    next four years living in the athletic dorm, eating at the training table.    You spent your Saturdays on the football field, cheered on by adoring    fans.  Tutors attended to your every academic need.  You attended    class when you felt like it. Sure, you worked hard.  You lifted    weights, ran sprints, studied plays, and soon became one of the top football    players in the country.  Your best friend was assigned to the    101st Airborne Division. While you were in college, he    deployed to Iraq once and Afghanistan twice.  He became a Sergeant and    led a squad of 19 year old soldiers who grew up just like he did..  He    shed his blood in Afghanistan and watched young American’s give their lives,    limbs, and innocence for the USA .                You went to the    NFL combine and scored off the charts.  You hired an agent and waited    for draft day.  You were drafted in the first round and your agent    immediately went to work, ensuring that you received the most money    possible. You signed for $16 million although you had never played a single    down of professional football  Your best friend re-enlisted in the Army    for four more years. As a combat tested sergeant, he will be paid $32,000    per year.                You will drive a    Ferrari on the streets of South Beach .  He will ride in the back of a    Blackhawk helicopter with 10 other combat loaded soldiers.  You will    sleep at the Ritz.  He will dig a hole in the ground and try to    sleep.  You will “make it rain” in the club.  He will pray for    rain as the temperature reaches 120 degrees.                On Sunday, you    will run into a stadium as tens of thousands of fans cheer and yell your    name.  For your best friend, there is little difference between Sunday    and any other day of the week.  There are no adoring fans.  There    are only people trying to kill him and his soldiers. Every now and then, he    and his soldiers leave the front lines and “go to the rear” to rest.      He might be lucky enough to catch an NFL game on TV.  When the National    Anthem plays and you take a knee, he will jump to his feet and salute the    television.  While you protest the unfairness of life in the United    States , he will give thanks to God that he has the honor of defending his    great country.                To the players    of the NFL:  We are the people who buy your tickets, watch you on TV,    and wear your jerseys.  We anxiously wait for Sundays so we can cheer    for you and marvel at your athleticism. Although we love to watch you play,    we care little about your opinions until you offend us. You have the    absolute right to express yourselves, but we have the absolute right to    boycott you.  We have tolerated your drug use and DUIs, your domestic    violence, and your vulgar displays of wealth.  We should be ashamed for    putting our admiration of your physical skills before what is morally    right.  But now you have gone too far. You have insulted our flag, our    country, our soldiers, our police officers, and our veterans. You are living    the American dream, yet you disparage our great country.  I am done    with NFL football and encourage all like minded Americans to boycott the NFL    as well.            — SHARE,    SHARE, SHARE — 

        
           National boycott    of the NFL for Sunday November 12th, Veterans Day Weekend. Boycott all    football telecast, all fans, all ticket holders, stay away from attending    any games, let them play to empty stadiums. Pass this post along to all your    friends and family. Honor our military, some of whom come home with the    American Flag draped over their coffin.

dear australia,

i would like to apologize on behalf of my country, and on behalf of the man named donald trump who is now the president of the united states…a fact i find hard to swallow (but will accept, because i believe in democracy and our right to vote and choose our leaders).

i am writing this from the backstage dressing room of a venue in brisbane, australia, where i am about to take the stage.

i’ve been coming to australia to tour and perform almost every year since 2004, and it’s a place i hold near and dear to my heart. i love this land, i love the people and the attitudes towards freedom here, and i love that we both - the americans and the australians - are close cousins in our difficult and entangled struggles in the dark waters of our deeply complicated histories. i believe that in time, we can help each other navigate these waters.

i want you to know that donald trump’s stance on immigration (and specifically this current australian/american refugee deal madness, see below) is not the stance i take, and it doesn’t reflect the stance of about 99% of my american friends and family. i know that, because we talk about it, on and off the internet.

donald trump bellowed at his inauguration that he would put “america first”, and that we are “the greatest country in the world”.

and i want you to know that i don’t believe that, and that my circle of american friends don’t believe that, and that pretty much everybody i know is deeply embarrassed that this man is the face of our nation.

i believe that we cannot, as a human race, leave our most destitute hanging … i believe that we cannot just “take care of our own and fuck everybody else”. i believe we are better than that.

america NOT “first”.

nor australia.

nobody “first”.

or: everybody first. world first.

togetherness first.
and together, we’re going to figure this out.
again…sorry.

please let’s stay friends.

love,
amanda

p.s. it’s been all over the news….but if you don’t know what i’m talking about, please go read this article from the new york times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/02/opinion/united-states-to-australia-get-lost.html

“The footballer who fights for equality.”

Imposing as on the soccer field, with high heels black, jean and a gray bustier turtleneck, she fixed her eyes on hundreds of young people from the One Young World 2017 in Bogota who wanted to hear one of the most frustrating episodes of her career but which helped her to pursue her desire: gender equality.

Hope Solo, 36, defended the United States jersey with love and passion as much as possible. 1.75 centimeters of pure pride, is described by some of her fans, those who now see her far from the competitions after the decision of the Federation of their country to remove her from the professional team because of the differences that always existed between the two parties.

“It is difficult to receive the changes but we have to accept them in the best way,” confesses the athlete, amid a dry tone that reflects her authority.

Her childhood was not easy, because her parents had a home flooded with uncertainty and alcohol. Only little speaks of the subject, in her autobiography mentions that her father was in prison and that her mother suffered a problem with the liquor. For this reason she found in football her escape valve, her love and, more importantly, her life.

By her childhood she knows that the obstacles are to overcome them and that the goals must be overcome from the mental power and the heart: “Life gives you and takes you away. It is necessary to continue and learn to be happy. ”

And that fight revived in her when the Federation of the United States suspended her to defend the T-shirt of its country after the Olympic Games of Rio de Janeiro 2016. The deepest stroke of its race.

Hope expressed her disagreement because the women’s footballers did not receive the same money as the men, something that for her is illogical because they are also professionals.

Her three Olympic soccer medals speak for her. That motivated her to ask what for her companions was fair. The federation decided to suspend her for six months and she responded with a lawsuit that continues to this day.

“They wanted to shut me up and they got me off the team. I made my global cause and my voice took more force,” she said.

Hope, she only knows that fighting the current brings her enemies. However, she sends the message to the women of the world to follow their goals without fear.

"There is no need to be silent because that does not change anything. Try to change the situation, "she said among the applause of the young people who received her message as a teaching of life. "The dreams have to be pursued,” they responded to the smile of the American player.

A Brief History of the Spork

The most grievous and recurrent misconception about the spork is that its name is a portmanteau of “spoon” and “fork.” Being part spoon and part fork this seems like the most obvious origin, but in fact the spork was invented by Edwin C. Sporke in New Orleans. Sporke invented the Spork in 1776, and the year is no coincidence. The story of the Spork is in fact, the story of the United States of America.

The year was 1773 and the industrial revolution was in its first decades. The colonists that would form the government of the United States were just arriving in the 13 colonies. At the age of 21, Thomas Jefferson had just been fired from his job in tech support at the University of Oxford. The only record of his duties there suggests that he mostly cleaned the old valuable globes, clocks, compasses, and the Ancient Abacus of Ankh-Ent-Ah-Baccus, where he is noted as having done a substandard job at removing abacus lint from the device. With no job and no prospects in England, Jefferson moved on up to the colonies in America, where he could begin a new life.

Jefferson came to America with only $7 to his name, and those dollars were worthless as the U.S. Treasury would not be formed for another 25 years. He arrived at the port of New Orleans, which was at the time called “Orleans-To-Be.” He had at the time no interest in politics, and applied to work at the only English-speaking establishment in the town. His days at McDonalds were unproductive. He slaughtered the cattle for beef, he peeled the potatoes for french fries, and he ground the bones for bread, which was made from bone powder before the evolution of wheat. But one important thing happened in his years at the restaurant: He met Edwin C. Sporke.

Sporke had arrived from Norway the year prior, and changed his name from Edvald Cornelius Sporkbeklagerdenfalskenorskenavnet to Edwin C. Sporke. Jefferson first saw him when he picked up his order for a Mutton McGruelbowl. Sporke sat down and, to Jefferson’s dismay, began trying to eat the liquid gruel with a fork. Curious, he brought the man a spoon and asked why he wasn’t using it instead. Sporke explained that spoons had been banned in Norway for hundreds of years owing to the infamous “Blood Spooning” of Vikings, from whom the Christian monarchy wanted to distance themselves. Jefferson encouraged Sporke to try, but he was hesitant. Finally, he agreed to eat the gruel with both at the same time, overlapping. The spork was born.

Because it could eat gruel more efficiently than a spoon or fork on their own, Raymond McDonald immediately began producing the utensil. This was done at first by having Jefferson weld spoons to forks, a job he so detested that he left for the east coast, taking the idea with him and keeping (most of) Sporke’s name attached, promising him royalties. Upon his arrival, Jefferson saw the next thing that would revolutionize the way we eat: The assembly line.

Famous entrepeneur- entrepeneuer– entreprenur—- famous businessman Henry Ford was living in New York, growing very rich with his mass constructed horse drawn carriages. Jefferson was impressed with the method, and immediately endeavored to accomplish a mass produced spork by means of his diligence, hard work, and persistence in buying slaves to do his real work for him. Among his early customers was Benjamin Franklin, who would go on to play so an integral role in the founding of the United States that well over 0.04% of Americans can tell you his role even today. Franklin loved the idea of the spork and showed it to George Washington, who could only eat gruel owing to the loss of his teeth in bad poker game in 1771. The men got along splendidly, and the rest, as they say, is history.

For Jefferson and the country at least. Records of Edwin Sporke are fewer and less revolutionary. Sporke never got any royalties. Whether Jefferson never sent them or whether they were stolen by railroad bandits en route will never be known, but as railroads only began delivering mail after 1804, most historians suspect Jefferson cheated Sporke out of his share of the profits. The only thing we now know for certain about Sporke is that he died in 1779, stabbed to death with his own invention during an argument over whether zebras were striped or spotted. Sporke not only died in the encounter, but made a fool of himself by claiming that the animals were spotted, having been tricked at a local zoo that displayed a dalmatian claimed to be the elusive African zebra.

But thankfully we now know his name, and his fate, and his integral role in the building of both the U.S.A. and the spork that bears his name. In this respect he remains far more fortunate than Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Nafzawi, who invented the spork in 1211 in Tunisia and is not remembered in any European history books at all for obvious reasons.

“The Language of Love”  Negan x Reader

Word Count: 2,225

Negan x Reader

Request: Can I request a Negan one? Where the reader grew up in France but moved to the US when she was young, but kept her French accent/French as her first language. And she gets taken as prisoner by Negan, but he treats her really well because he’s attracted to her. But one day he just pisses the reader off and she starts to cuss him out in French, and it turns Negan on a lot. And it leads to smut?

Warnings: Smut (oral receiving and giving, no actual penetration), swearing, language kink, I think Negan in general should just be a warning, dom! Negan

a/n: this was a request from someone who messaged me, and I told them I would do it, but I just wanted to point out that I do not speak French. This is all from google translate so I sincerely apologize if anything is not correct!


Originally posted by wildling-heart

Growing up in a country that you were not born in was not the easiest of tasks you have ever had to do. You were originally born in France in a small town just outside Paris, and you lived there until you were thirteen. You loved it there, and once your parents told you that you were moving to the United States (Georgia, in particular), you were not pleased.

You grew to enjoy living here, and everyone was nice to you. The only real problem was the language barrier. You knew minimal English at first, and your French accent was thick. Of course, the other students loved it, but it made it hard for them to understand you, especially when you only knew a few basic words.

As you got older, English became second nature to you, and you barely spoke French anymore. Especially now that it was the apocalypse, none of your French-speaking family was alive anymore, and no one in your group could speak it. You tended to keep that side of you separate from your life now. Life now was different, and you treated it that way. You wanted to put your old self behind and become someone who would survive out here, and dwelling on the past wouldn’t help that.

The only time that you ever spoke French was when you were mad. Oh, man, when you were mad, it came out without you being able to control.

Baisez-vous, je ne vous dis rien!” You spit at the man in front of you. He calls himself Negan, although you’re sure that can’t be his real name. You figure it’s probably a fake name, like what the Governor used. He’s attractive, you’ll admit. The way he carries himself, his beard, just in face in general… Damn. But he was not a good guy. You’ll never let his attractiveness get to you. “Éloigne-toi de moi!”

Keep reading

  • what she says: im fine
  • what she means: Most people think I was named for the state, but it's not true. I was named for a battle ship. The U.S.S. Arizona. My grandfather was serving on the Arizona when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. He saved 19 men before he drowned. Pretty much everything my father did his whole life was about honoring that sacrifice. I was raised to be a good man in a storm. Raised to love my country. To love my family. To protect the things I love. When my father, Colonel Daniel Robbins of the United States Marine Corps, found out I was a lesbian, he said he only had one question. I was expecting, "how fast can you get the hell out of my house?" But instead it was, "are you still the person I raised you to be?" My father believed in country the way you believe in God and my father is not a man who bends but he bent for me because I'm his daughter. I'm a good man in a storm. I love your daughter. And I protect the things I love. Not that I need to. She doesn't need it. She's strong, and caring, and honorable. She's who you raised her to be.
Most people think that I was named for the state, but it’s not true, I was named for a battle ship. The U.S.S. Arizona. My grandfather was serving on the Arizona when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, and he saved nineteen men before he drowned. Pretty much everything my father did his whole life was about honoring that sacrifice. I was raised to be a good man in a storm. Raised to love my country. Love my family. Protect the things I love. When my father, Colonel Daniel Robbins of the United States Marine Corps, heard that I was a lesbian he said he only had one question. I was prepared for: “How fast can you get the hell out of my house?” But instead, it was: “Are you still who I raised you to be?” My father believes in country the way that you believe in God. And my father is not a man who bends, but he bent for me because I am his daughter. I’m a good man in a storm. I love your daughter. And I protect the things I love. Not that I need too; she doesn’t need it. She’s strong, and caring, and honorable. And she’s who you raised her to be.
—  Arizona Robbins

Future generations may mark today as one of the truly dark days in American history, a history that may soon take an even more ominous turn.

President Trump’s sudden firing of FBI Director James Comey is a matter that should deeply concern every American, regardless of party, partisan politics or ideological leanings.

The independence of our law enforcement is at the bedrock of our democracy. That independance, already grievously shaken under the brief tenure of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is now shattered by uncertainty.

The firing of an FBI Director is always a very serious matter in normal times. But these times aren’t normal. Far from it. The Bureau is engaged in one of the most important and perilous investigations of this or any other presidency—the investigation of connections between the Trump election campaign and the Russian government.

The questions mount and the shadow grows darker. What were those connections? What did Mr. Trump know about them and when did he know it? How can the President explain the serious allegations against his former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn? And what is President Trump hiding in this regard? It’s imperative that the nation—We The People—get answers to those questions. It will take time, but the process must start now.

A politicized FBI is the last thing we need as we struggle through the maze of lies, concealment and ever-deepening mysteries. The last time a President fired prosecutors who were investigating him was Richard Nixon during the widespread criminal conspiracy known for short as “Watergate.” We all know how that turned out. In real ways, this potential scandal and coverup are much graver. We are talking about the very security of the United States and the sanctity of our republic.

Thomas Paine famously wrote in 1776: “These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. ”

I see this as having the potential for a similar reflection point in our American story. If there is a cover up, if our nation is at the risk that has certainly been more than suggested, it is incumbent upon everyone who claims to love this nation to demand answers.

We need a special prosecutor. We need an independent investigation. There is, obviously, much we don’t know about what has just happened, why it happened and why now. Just as obviously there is much more, so much more that we need know. We need to damn the lies and expose the truth.

- Dan Rather

He claims he’s for the United States, that he loves this land and wants to protect it. But with the heavy hand of transphobia he’s pushing away those who want to help war efforts. He’s pushing away skill workers and the determined. He’s pushing away an entire demographic of people. He’s tyrannical, bigoted and confused. At every corner he destroys this country in another way. This country prides itself on providing equal opportunities but it never has. And now we’re drifting away from that morality and equality we tried to use as a facade.

6

Robert Francis Kennedy ● (November 20, 1925 - June 6, 1968)

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.”

This world. This world is fucked up.

Hi,  for those of you who don’t know me, which is almost everyone who will ever read this, I’m Jasmine. I’m a 17 year old teenage girl who, today, woke up to the news that her country was attacked, twice. I live in the United States, it’s been almost a year since I’ve moved here, I was born here but moved away when I was young. I’m Iranian, no I wasn’t born there or raised in the country but that is my nationality, it’s what identify with. My parents were both born and raised in Iran, so those culture and traditions are very important to our family. We visit Iran multiple times a year, we owned a house in Tehran, we have loved ones all around the country and memories in every corner. So, imagine the panic, devastation and angry that went through me when I was made aware of this attack. 

Unfortunately, attacks have become common, normal almost. Within the last month both Manchester and London were attacked, and now, Tehran. The difference is, EVERYONE knew of the other attacks, from my friends texting me if I had heard of what happened, to politicians releasing statements, celebrities tweeting and posting about it, it was everywhere, as it should be. I want to make one thing clear before I continue, I believe and support the things I previously mentioned, I myself participated in bringing awareness to those tragic events and prayed for all those harmed and effected.    

I saw ONE post about the Tehran attack, one. It was a snapchat post from an Iranian friend of mine. That is the only post I saw about the event. From all these social media outlets and the thousands of people in which I follow and see, I only saw ONE post. The first thing I did was, got out of bed and went to ask my mum if everyone, from the hundreds of people we know and love in Iran, were okay. When these attacks happened in other countries, everyone was talking about it, my feed on every single social media was filled with post and statements of the unfortunate events. For the first time, I had to search up the event, it’s not trending, people aren’t talking about it, it’s not head lining news like the rest were, it’s just not important. 

Now, Iran is not the only country that has been neglected, I have spoken about this with people before, there are certain countries that others just don’t give a damn about. Places like Turkey which has been attacked multiple times, Syria which is in an internal war and only at times do we shed light on the severity of the issue. I went online to educate myself on what’s going on in more depth, the things I found, absolutely disgusting. People didn’t care, some were happy and said that Iran deserved it, one person went as far as to say “Couldn’t care less if they were all blown up. Terrorist attacking terrorist. I’ll sit back with my popcorn and laugh all the time”, ARE YOU KIDDING ME. THIS IS SOCIETY. Our world has turned in to a pathetic, disgusting, divided nation, that only unites when it looks good. 

I’ve stood by and prayed for every country that has been attacked, our country doesn’t get that same love. My friends texted me after Manchester saying, “did you hear what happened?”. Today, only one friend had asked me if I had heard and if everyone I knew was okay, only one. People who know where I am from, who have seen my post about the attack haven’t shown support, haven’t asked if anything happened, if those I love are okay, if any human being is okay. 

I don’t blame everyone for not being aware, it is the medias duty to raise equal awareness. I’m not mad anymore, I’m disappointed in humanity, for multiple reasons, from the attackers who are regularly doing this, to people who are neglecting a country in their time of need. 

If you took nothing from everything I have said today, take this. A country is not it’s government, a country is not it’s politics, a country is not it’s mistakes. A country is it’s culture, it’s traditions, the people, the history, the sights, the generations of life and the spirit of it’s soul. 

2 attacks, one day, 12 killed, around 40 injured and almost zero awareness. 

There’s so much suffering going on in the world right now, there’s not only one place to think of, let alone mention here. My heart is with everyone who may need it.

🌎🌺🌍🌻🌏💐

And to everyone in the U.S. not affected by the hurricanes, if you see a Military Veteran or Active Duty person, Fire Fighter, or Police Officer, please thank them for their service. September 11th, 2001 forever changed our country, and they were there to protect us.

With all the crazy stuff going on about Trump’s insane executive orders I thought I might just give some of my own input.

Of course, I was already shocked when I heard about the “Muslim ban”. But my cousin, a conservator at a museum who is rather well known in the art world, called recently because she was so distraught.

So many art conservators and people who are very important to her job are now either banned from entering the United States or can’t return home and be able to come back. So many people can’t come here and bring their knowledge. So many people can’t come and bring their art. The United States has now completely ostracized itself from the art world because we won’t be able to hold museum conferences unless we exclude all the representatives from Islamic countries.

Isn’t that horrible? It hurts so bad. I absolutely love art, and I love all art - and I love Islamic art too. And it hurts so horribly that idiot Donald Trump hasn’t really considered the implications of his rash decisions. And of course, this is only one effect … it hurts so bad that we exclude so many people - not to mention all the refugees and immigrants who seek refuge here from their countries at war, but also the people who help to expand our knowledge and promote beauty. It hurts.

We have to change it.