countries series

anonymous asked:

It's called adaptation... holy shit, you think other countries don't do it? Chinese and Japanese have both adapted Korean and American movies, shows, hell, even my fucking country adapted American series. Honestly, I'm absolutely baffled by thought process of people like you; I'm not saying I myself am perfect in any way, but seriously. Then again, 60-70% of the world is religious, no wonder people can swallow any ideology they stumble upon. Kind of reminds me of Centipede movie, heh.

It’s not adaptation, it’s whitewashing. Centipede movie alright, your mouth connects to your ass.

Foreign poets 
are hotter,
because we know war,
we are born with war, 
we are the war. 
Our poetry has 
the deepest roots. Perhaps, 
the ugliest, the most delicious. 
The sharpest accent. The most
heartbreaking metaphors. 

First generation, second generation, 
and you would still feel 
the agony the white men left
in our grandfathers’ skin. 

And dare me,
I lick my fingers 
and I  eat your European 
food with pride my darlings, 
for our spices made 
your countries.

—  My Grandfathers Own Europe from The Immigration Series by Royla Asghar 
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Country x Reader Series: China // Turkey // Japan // Italy // Germany // America // Prussia //France // Russia // England// Romano // Netherlands
Translated with permission from @ayase-memo​(美味しいにーにご馳走様でした!)
Typesetting by @jammerlea (THANK YOU AS ALWAYS!!)

Please ask @ayase-memo​ for permission if you want to retranslate/repost her work. There’s no need to ask me for my english translation. Thank you! (=w=)7

ORIGINAL

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3 Down , 9 To Go

Upcoming Disney Shows for 2017-2018 lineup

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“If you can’t be unafraid, be afraid and happy.” 

You can…call me Da,” he said. His voice was husky; he stopped and cleared his throat. “If–if ye want to, I mean,” he added diffidently.

“Da,” she said, and felt the smile bloom easily this time, unmarred by tears.

“Da. Is that Gaelic?”

He smiled back, the corners of his mouth trembling slightly. “No. It’s only…simple.”

And suddenly it was all simple. He held out his arms to her. She stepped into them and found that she had been wrong; he was as big as she’d imagined–and his arms were as strong about her as she had ever dared to hope.

—  Jamie and Brianna Fraser (Drums of Autumn)

Disney ABC Upfront for 2017/2018 will be on March 13-15 renewals & new shows announced for the networks 

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Upcoming Disney animated shows 

inspired by x

Masterlist 1

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NCT reactions (gif and text):

NCT boyfriend series:

Ideal type:

Fake texts:

Team Trophy Husband Jack

I honestly now want the fic where Jack might be an extremely successful hockey player, etc, but for the rest of the world who don’t follow NHL and sport news, he’s Eric Bittle’s trophy husband.

Eric Bittle, who has his own Cooking Show, a Baking Contest Reality TV spin off, a chain of bakeries expanding all over the country, a series of books, and is a guest editor in some cooking magazines.

He’s Beyonce’s go to guy for Blue Ivy’s birthday cakes.

So yeah, his husband married him for the money. Never mind that they are college sweethearts and they married before Bitty had his big break.

And Bitty married him for his good looks. I mean Jack looks like a model, has that amazing bod and booty and is pretty much silent anytime they are in front of the cameras, it is clear he’s the classic dumb jock stereotype.

Bitty always gets extremely offended by that, Jack thinks it’s hilarious. He might play it up sometimes just to get out of interviews.

Jack always endlessly amused that the paparazzi that follow them are there for Bitty. They don’t particularly care about Jack. Their photos appear in the magazines as “Eric Bittle and husband.”

Jack has managed his life long dream of achieving invisibility in the media by marrying somebody who overshadows him. It is everything he ever wanted. He brags about it to anybody who will listen.

Bitty remains annoyed.

Once they are home, after going to a premiere of something/red carpet event.

“You have won 3 Stanley Cups! One two weeks ago! Why don’t they ask you about that? They only asked you what you were wearing!”

“Hugo Boss” Jack says without missing a bit.

“You could try not to make it so easy for them.”

“Fall Collection.”

“You are enjoying this too much.”

“Besides Bitty, you ordered a Pumpkin Spice drink today and went to do your own grocery shopping, how could I compare to that?”

“Jack this isn’t funny! I’m proud of you and I want them to know that.”

“I’m proud of you too, I mean, look at you walking down the street with sunglasses on.”

“I hate you.”

“Oh look, you are cheating on me with Shitty, Ransom, and Chowder… oh, also with Lardo? Bitty, I could forgive the first three, but not Lardo!”

“That’s it, you cannot buy anymore tabloids.”

“But Bitty! This magazine says we are getting a divorce! If I hadn’t bought the magazine, I wouldn’t have known to start packing my bags. Also, I apparently didn’t sign any prenup, so you owe me a lot of money.”

“I might leave you for Lardo after all.”

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nightmare:

1:  an evil spirit formerly thought to oppress people during sleep

2:  a frightening dream that usually awakens the sleeper

3:  something (as an experience, situation, or object) having the monstrous character of a nightmare or producing a feeling of anxiety or terror

Asked and Answered: A President for Indian Country

As a candidate visiting the Crow Nation in Montana in May 2008, President Obama pledged to host an annual summit with tribal leaders to ensure that tribal nations have a seat at the table when facing important decisions about their communities. Today, the President hosts the eighth and final Tribal Nations Conference of his Presidency.

We’ve made historic progress to strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship and build a more prosperous and resilient Indian Country—helped by countless tribal leaders and youth who have worked alongside the President to make change. One of those leaders is Lindsay Early, a member of the Comanche Tribe who has dedicated her career to lifting up her community, and who wrote the President earlier this year.

Read the letter from Lindsay:

Dear President Obama,

I am a proud enrolled member of the Comanche Nation of Oklahoma and a recent graduate of the University Of Oklahoma College Of Law. I wanted to take a few moments to thank you for all of the hard work you and First Lady Michelle Obama have done on behalf of Indian Country. As the end of your second term is quickly approaching, I wanted to offer some native insight on just how effective your policies have been in Indian Country.

Like you, I came from very humble beginnings. My single mother did the best she could to raise me. We struggled with many problems that are common to Native Americans; poor healthcare, poverty, lack of access to jobs, and addiction were prevalent in my community. We lived with different relatives and friends, and sometimes even lived in our car. I worked hard and excelled in school, and was fortunate to receive the Gates Millennium Scholarship and went on to become the first in my family to graduate from college. During my freshman year of college, my best friend and I skipped our classes, put on our Barack the Vote tee-shirts, and scrounged up enough gas money to travel four hours to Dallas to go see the promising young Senator from Chicago.

At the rally, we met people of all ages, races, and creeds. Despite our different circumstances, we were all united by the common hope for change and better opportunities. When it was time for you to speak, the crowd grew quiet, anxious to hear your plans for this great country of ours. In the speech, you promised you would always do your best to represent all Americans. When you mentioned plans to represent African Americans, the crowd erupted. When you spoke about the importance of the Latino vote, the crowd once again let out a roaring cheer. Lastly, you mentioned that you would do your best to represent Native Americans. Two little voices screamed as loud as we could from the balcony. You answered back, “I hear you girls, and when I am elected, I won’t forget you!”

We were absolutely ecstatic. You see, President Obama, this was the first time we had ever heard any presidential candidate mention Native Americans. This was the first time any presidential candidate had made us feel that we mattered and our voices were important. You made me feel that through hard work and determination, anyone can achieve the American dream, and you were right.

After law school, I returned home to my tribe and accepted a position advising the Comanche Nation Chairman. My position requires me to keep our tribal leaders apprised of federal policies and proposed legislation regarding water rights, economic development, sovereignty, natural resources, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. Because of this, I know firsthand how your policies have reinvigorated Indian Country and allowed tribes the opportunities to continue working hard to improve the lives of our citizens.

Just as witnessing you speak in Dallas changed the course of my life, your presidency has positively changed how Indian Country interacts with our national decision makers. By vetoing the Keystone Pipeline, you helped us protect our sacred sites. By tackling climate change head on, you have insured that our planet will be safe for generations to come. The passage of the Affordable Care Act provided critical healthcare to members of tribes who otherwise might not be able to afford it. The Tribal Law and Order Act allowed tribes increased jurisdiction to prosecute those that threaten the safety and welfare of our citizens. By speaking out against the Washington football team name, you have reminded us that we deserve the same treatment as any other group in this great nation of ours. The Generation Indigenous initiative has ensured that our Native American youth reach their full potential, teaching them that their contributions are important to this country and that they too are worthy of achieving the American Dream. The White House Tribal Nations Conferences have given tribes what we have so desperately fought for—a seat at the table, a chance for our voices to be heard. I can visibly see and feel the differences in Indian Country in the seven years you have been in office, and for that I want to thank you.

You have managed to do for Native Americans what no president has done before, President Obama. You promised during that speech in Dallas that when you where in office, you wouldn’t forget about us. Thank you for keeping your promise! I am so proud to call you my President. May the Creator continue to bless you and your family, and continue to bless the United States of America.

Sincerely,

Lindsay Early,

United States Citizen and Member of the Comanche Nation

Read President Obama’s response:

Dear Lindsay:

I read the letter you wrote earlier this year, and it meant a lot that you took the time to send it. You’re right that I’ve worked pretty hard to fulfill my campaign promises—I’ve always believed that the success of our tribal communities is tied to the success of America as a whole, and it’s heartening to hear that my Administration’s efforts to build a true nation-to-nation relationship with tribes like yours have made a difference.

It sounds to me like you’ve been working hard to make a difference too, and I trust you take pride in how far you’ve come since your freshman year of college. It’s a tremendous privilege to serve as your President, but far more than my being in Office, I suspect it’s the passion and dedication of folks like you that have truly changed our country for the better.

Thank you for writing, and for everything you’ve put into reaching for the brighter future we all deserve. Voices like yours give me great hope for what’s to come, and I trust you’ll keep at it!

All the best,

President Obama

We’ve come a long way together—but there’s still work to do for Indian Country and for all Americans. Let’s keep moving forward. Tune in to today’s live coverage of the Tribal Nations Conference.