cottingley

May 22nd 1859 saw the birth of  Arthur Conan Doyle in Edinburgh.

Every one knows who Conan Doyle is, but the name Conan as we use it today was not part of his surname , his full name was Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, Ignatius and Conan were middle names, Shortly after he graduated from high school he began using Conan as part of his surname.

Doyle was  friends with J M Barrie, Bram Stoker, and Robert Louis Stevenson was a fellow classmate at the University of Edinburgh. As well as being a keen Cricketer, under the pseudonym AC Smith, he played as a goalkeeper for amateur side Portsmouth Association Football Club, a precursor of the modern Portsmouth FC. 

Sherlock might have been a sceptic but Arthur Conan Doyle believed in fairies. Well, he was convinced by the Cottingley Fairy photographs, the famous 1917 hoax. He even spent a million dollars promoting them and wrote a book, The Coming of the Fairies on their authenticity, at this time he had a public fall out with another celebrity friend Harry Houdini, who at the same time was trying to disprove the claims of the Spiritualist movement.

Conan Doyle also had another very public disagreement about the Titanic disaster. He was outraged by the dismissive and bitter comments made by the playwright regarding the many acts of heroics that took place aboard the ship as it went down.

Arthur Conan Doyle didn’t just write mysteries, he actually solved a few. One of particular interest to him was The Curious Case of Oscar Slater - for the murder of Marion Gilchrist, a wealthy 82-year-old woman from Glasgow. Doyle applied the “Holmes method”, in which he uncovered new evidence, recalled witnesses and questioned the prosecution’s evidence. His findings were published as a plea for Slater’s pardon. It caused a sensation and there were calls for a retrial, but all this was promptly ignored by the Scottish authorities. The desperate and incarcerated Slater later smuggled messages out of prison and Doyle’s interest in the case was reignited. He wrote to politicians and used his own money to fund Slater’s legal fees. Ramsay MacDonald heard about this and told told the Scottish Secretary that the police and the legal authorities had colluded to withhold evidence and influence witnesses. Slater was subsequently released from prison with £6,000 compensation.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died on July 7, 1930. He collapsed in his garden, clutching his heart with one hand and holding a flower in the other. His last words were to his wife. He whispered to her: “You are wonderful.”

if you think the invention of the internet has made people believe anything, you are dead wrong

when photographs were invented, people assumed anything in a photograph had to be real. so in 1917 some little girls drew pictures of fairies, cut them out, and took pictures of them in various positions. people bought it. sir arthur conan doyle even endorsed it in a scholarly article.

convincing as fuck, right???

THE GIRLS DIDN’T EVEN ADMIT THEY WERE FAKE TIL THE 1980′s!!!!

(for you history nerds, this is known as the “cottingley fairies” hoax)

Faeries in Films

Fairytale: A True Story (1997)

Set in Yorkshire, Fairytale retells the story of the famous Cottingly Fairies, and of the two cousins who discovered them. Elsie and Frances were a big deal back in 1920: their photographs of fairies sparked the interest of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who had them published in The Strand Magazine, making them kinda famous. A very heartfelt and magical movie. Chance of seeing real fairies 10/10.

Strange Magic (2015)

Originally posted by ive-been-mistreated

Originally posted by pegaslick

Love sword-fighting fairy princesses? Look no further because Marianne’s your girl. Seriously, the coolest character I know. Anyway, she’s a badass who fights the Goblin King (see above, his name’s Bog) to save her sister Dawn, and there’s a lot of singing and love potions and beating up douchebags and just generally Marianne having to deal with all the shit that goes down in her kingdom…. It’s so awesome. Based off Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Magical Legend of The Leprechauns (1999)

It’s a Romeo-and-Juliet inspired film between a fairy princess and a leprechaun. If you can excuse the poor quality and the weird side-plot about their human neighbours, you’ll find that Mickey’s gang is hilarious, the love story kind of cute, and the soundtrack very faerie-esque. There’s one scene where they just make a bunch of Irish dancers and just… dance? And the Leprechaun boys go to the fairy ball disguised as Leprechauns? This fucking film, man.

Peter Pan (2003)

Originally posted by your-biggest-pretend

This boy is so fae it’s unreal. As well as having a beautiful scene in which Peter and Wendy watch the Faerie Prince and Princess dance, it’s also one of my favourite Peter Pan adaptations. Amazing visuals, soundtrack, cast, and its Tinkerbell is hilariously wonderful.

Part 2 (x)

The Cottingley Fairies

 

The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, near Bradford in England. In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 years old and Frances was 10. The pictures came to the attention of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who used them to illustrate an article on fairies he had been commissioned to write for the Christmas 1920 edition of The Strand Magazine. Conan Doyle, as a Spritualist, was enthusiastic about the photographs, and interpreted them as clear and visible evidence of psychic phenomena. Public reaction was mixed; some accepted that the images were genuine, but others believed they had been faked.

Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually declined after 1921. Both girls grew up, married and lived abroad for a time. Yet, the photographs continued to hold the public imagination; in 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper traced Elsie, who had by then returned to the UK. Elsie left open the possibility that she believed she had photographed her thoughts, and the media once again became interested in the story. In the early 1980s, both admitted that the photographs were faked using cardboard cutouts of fairies copied from a popular children’s book of the time. Yet Frances continued to claim that the fifth and final photograph was genuine.

The photographs and two of the cameras used are on display in the National Media Museum in Bradford.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cottingley_Fairies

The Cottingley Fairies is a name give to a series of photographs taken by nine-year-old Frances Griffiths and her cousin, Elsie Wright, in 1917. The girls photographed “faires” in the garden. The faires were actually well-made cardboard cutouts, but the Victorian audience were fairly convinced: It was one of the most elaborate hoaxes of the time and hundreds flocked to the garden to see the famous Cottingley Fairies.

The Cottingley Fairies

The Cottingley Fairies are a series of photographs taken by two little English girls, Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths. These photographs sparked a lot of attention at the time, even the attention of the famous Arthur Conan Doyle, author to Sherlock Holmes. This is because one of the ‘proofs’ that fairies do exist. Unfortunately, it was later proven that these fairies are actually cutouts from a children’s storybook. Nevertheless, it looked believable though. See it for yourself:

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In 1917, Frances Griffith and Elsie Wright took a series of photographs that clearly depicted them playing with a group of fairies. The girls, when showing their parents, insisted the photos were real. Their mother took the photos to a photographer, who declared the photos were genuine. The photos quickly picked up steam and even managed to convince Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of their authenticity. The girls maintained their stories until the 1980s, when Elsie finally admitted to the fairies being paper cut-outs made from sketches based on fairies from the book Princess Mary’s Gift Book. Hats off to these girls for pulling one over on Doyle himself!

anonymous asked:

Have you maybe seen a movie called "FairyTale: A True Story"? It's a very beautiful movie with fairies in it. :)

I have not, yet, but I will surely look into it if it’s about fairies! Just judging by the cover when I search up the title, it reminds of the “true story” of the Cottingley Fairies.

Bravat the Fae

Crack theory of the day: Bravat is a fairy. Not an angel or demon. Literally a fairy. If we assume he’s not human, backed up by the strange coloring of his eyes and his ability to pinpoint Sebastian’s demonic essence:

(It’s possible he was fed information about Sebastian and Ciel or that he’s wearing contact lenses (even though those didn’t exist in the Victorian era…) or some bizarre drug managed to change his eye color. So Bravat could just be a charlatan in an epically boring plot “twist” with a capital B for boring. I admit this is a strong possibility)

Onto the evidence for this crack theory. 

Fairies are generally described as human in appearance and having magical powers. Diminutive fairies of one kind or another have been recorded for centuries, but occur alongside the human-sized beings. Even with these small fairies, however, their small size may be magically assumed rather than constant. Some fairies though normally quite small were able to dilate their figures to imitate humans

Bravat’s certainly human-sized. But if he is one of these shapeshifters, his size and appearance aren’t definite. Other folklore points at fairies as pagan deities. Even more interesting is what fairies were in Christianity:

One Christian belief held that fairies were a class of “demoted” angels. One popular story described how, when the angels revolted, God ordered the gates of heaven shut: those still in heaven remained angels, those in hell became demons, and those caught in between became fairies. Others suggested that the fairies, not being good enough, had been thrown out of heaven, but they were not evil enough for hell. This may explain the tradition that they had to pay a “teind” or titheto hell: as fallen angels, though not quite devils, they could be seen as subjects of the devil.

In Kuro-canon, we have demons and death gods. We can assume other deities and angels exist. Since Yana combined Japanese and Western mythos with her own imagination for the shinigami, it’s entirely possible she can do her own spin on fairies. 

Bravat promotes radiance and has an overall bright vibe to him. He could pass as a sun god or an angel in these circumstances:

But we’ve seen him act sinister and smug too:

If Sebastian has never met a shinigami before Grell, it’s possible he’s never met a fairy either. And being something in between an angel and a demon, Bravat’s essence isn’t something that’s easily given away. Also note that in the past chapters, Sebastian never stated Bravat was human.

Bravat himself said that (or did he? hmm):

And he could be right:

One popular belief was that [faireis] were the dead. This noted that many common points of belief, such as the same legends being told of ghosts and fairies, thesídhe in actuality being burial mounds, it being dangerous to eat food in both Fairyland and Hades, and both the dead and fairies living underground. Diane Purkiss observes an equating of fairies with the untimely dead who left “unfinished lives”.

Alternatively Yana goes with this theory. She already did the “reapers were once human” gist so why not fairies? Then technically speaking, Bravat is still human, though a “transformed” one. And this would arguably make the Blue Sect even creepier.

We know there’s something off about the food in the music hall:

If Bravat is behind this, it means the food is keeping everyone there like Persephone’s pomegranates. Then it goes beyond a drug and becomes a pact they made with him. For all we know, he’s planning to have everyone killed to join fairyland.

So far, Bravat’s personality has been far from angelic. He’s insulted people and made perverted jokes, all while being very smug:

In Scottish lore, fairies are divided into the Seelie Court, the more beneficently inclined (but still dangerous) fairies, and theUnseelie Court, the malicious fairies. While the fairies from the Seelie court enjoyed playing pranks on humans they were usually harmless affairs, compared to the Unseelie court that enjoyed bringing harm to humans as entertainment 

Bravat could be a malicious fairy. He’s amused by the Blue Sect and seems to take some joy in causing other people discomfort (see: his laughing at Lizzie, his smirk at kicking Sebastian out). And if 112 spoilers are anything to go by, Bravat approves of  these elaborate singing shows as good fun, which sounds exactly like something a mischievous fairy would do.

There’s also the belief that fairies cause consumption because they force young people to dance at revels all night and not rest. Which seems to be exactly what Bravat is doing to the P4 and heaven knows who else.

Fairies are also connected to Theosophy, which is “seeking direct knowledge of, presumed mysteries of being and nature, particularly concerning the nature of divinity.” I’ve seen Theosophy mentioned before in how it seems suspiciously similar to the radiance philosophy Bravat preaches:

Another belief is that the fairies were an intelligent species, distinct from humans and angels. In alchemy, they were regarded as elementals. This is uncommon in folklore, but accounts describing the fairies as “spirits of the air” have been found. The belief in their angelic nature was common in Theosophist circles.

And his looks. Bravat is dressed in a way that directly connects him to the stars AKA nature. And his hair- besides the wild style, it seems dark towards the center and whitewashed at the tips. There have only been two characters with duo-hair so far: Cheslock who probably uses dye and Ronald who either uses dye or gained that color through death.

In Bravat’s case, his hair could be all natural. If he turns out to be a fairy, that is.

The last clue lies in another character: Arthur Conan Doyle.

The Cottingley Fairies photographs in 1917 (revealed by the “photographers” in 1981 to have been faked) were originally publicized by Theosophists, many of whom believed them to be real.

Historically, he gained a fascination with fairies because of that picture. Yana’s already established that Arthur won’t be meeting up with Sebastian and Ciel ever again, but that doesn’t strike out the existence of the supernatural for him. Maybe there’s more basis for Arthur’s fairy obsession in Kuro-verse than real life.

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I decided to have another go with photography. Still learning but getting there I think!

I’m a long time fan of the Cottingley Fairies by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths. I did this style once before for a university project but honestly, it’s just great fun putting fictional characters into real settings ^^

Characters used are:

Ickle Muse, Mudpie and Flugeltoot Notes belong to Ickle-Muse

Techno Wizard belongs to Techno-Mod

Sombra And Coffee Talk belong to Wiggles

Misfit-Filly belongs to Misfit Mod

I hope you all don’t mind me using/ humanizing your characters ^^;

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The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, England. In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 years old and Frances was 10. The pictures came to the attention of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who used them to illustrate an article on fairies he had been commissioned to write for the Christmas 1920 edition of The Strand Magazine.

Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually declined after 1921. Yet the photographs continued to hold the public imagination; in 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper traced Elsie, who had by then returned to the UK. Elsie left open the possibility that she believed she had photographed her thoughts, and the media once again became interested in the story. In the early 1980s Elsie and Frances admitted that the photographs were faked using cardboard cutouts of fairies copied from a popular children’s book of the time, but Frances continued to claim that the fifth and final photograph was genuine.