cotswold hills

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(via Lavender Fields | Cotswold Lavender from Hill Barn Farm Broadway Worcs. by Mike | Flickr)

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“In architecture, a folly is a building constructed primarily for decoration, but suggesting through its appearance some other purpose, or of such extravagant appearance that it transcends the range of garden ornaments usually associated with the class of buildings to which it belongs.

Broadway Tower is a folly on Broadway Hill, near the village of Broadway, in the English county of Worcestershire, at the second-highest point of the Cotswolds after Cleeve Hill. The “Saxon” tower was designed in 1794 in the form of a castle, and built for Lady Coventry in 1798–99. The tower was built on a “beacon” hill, where beacons were lit on special occasions. Lady Coventry wondered whether a beacon on this hill could be seen from her house in Worcester — about 22 miles (35 km) away — and sponsored the construction of the folly to find out. Indeed, the beacon could be seen clearly.“ [x][x][x]

(more at @annotated-hetalia)

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Broadway Tower is a folly on Broadway Hill, near the village of Broadway, in the English county of Worcestershire, at the second-highest point of the Cotswolds (after Cleeve Hill). Broadway Tower’s base is 1,024 feet (312 metres) above sea level. The tower itself stands 65 feet (20 metres) high.

The “Saxon” tower was the brainchild of Capability Brown and designed by James Wyatt in 1794 in the form of a castle, and built for Lady Coventry in 1798–99. The tower was built on a “beacon” hill, where beacons were lit on special occasions. Lady Coventry wondered whether a beacon on this hill could be seen from her house in Worcester — about 22 miles (35 km) away — and sponsored the construction of the folly to find out. Indeed, the beacon could be seen clearly.

Over the years, the tower was home to the printing press of Sir Thomas Phillipps, and served as a country retreat for artists including William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones who rented it together in the 1880s. William Morris was so inspired by Broadway Tower and other ancient buildings that he founded the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings in 1877.

Today, the tower is a tourist attraction and the centre of a country park with various exhibitions open to the public at a fee, as well as a gift shop and restaurant. The place is on the Cotswold Way and can be reached by following the Cotswold Way from the A44 road at Fish Hill, or by a steep climb out of Broadway village.

In the Bluebell Woods
Noriaki Sugiyama
In the Bluebell Woods

I have a question for you guys, are you okay with me posting lyrics without the song? Because I translated this before Hetalia Archives posted the song, but I had no choice but to wait before they did, and by that time, they too had translated it.


In the Bluebell Woods: English Translation


When you have finished your cup of tea, let’s embark to the outside world, together with a unicorn.

His mane flutters in the wind, the Daoine Sidhe is singing, the pixies are happy too!


Exiting the Cotswolds to Calton Hill,

To the Palace of Holyroodhouse; I wonder if there’s anyone there right now?

“Ah, a flag! Her Majesty is coming! ☆”


In the bluebell woods, over a tea party of fairies,

There is lively chatter and the usual smile.

Robin Goodfellow has on a mischievous face,

Looking to play with friends, come again next time.


Moving forward through the River Conwy to the Bodnant Garden, everything is healed in this beautiful place.


Smelling the sea, I wonder which place we’ll go to next?

Fueled by the western winds, the Arc de Triomph is revealed!

“Wait—isn’t this at that guy’s place?!”


While slowly returning with the Dover Strait,

You must feel at ease with this favorite scenery.

I bought a lot of baked beans and ale!

Friends are waiting for you at home, so return quickly.


In Trafalgar Square, take a deep breath until your chest is full.

As expected, you must feel at ease with this air.


In the bluebell woods, fairies are in my dreams.

A fun first day, over in a blink.

Keep going to the west, beyond the Irish Sea.

Come on, embark on a journey to the next location, and I will come too.

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The Cotswolds | England, UK

The Cotswolds is an area in south central England and one of the most unspoilt regions of the country, being officially designated in 1966 as an area of outstanding natural beauty. The rolling hills of Cotswolds rise from the meadows of the upper Thames to an escarpment known as the Cotswolds Edge, just above the Severn Valley and Evesham Vale. The typical Cotswolds towns are Burford, Chipping Norton, Cirencester, Moreton-in-Marsh and Stow-on-The-Wold.

Cotswolds’ name is attributed to the meaning “sheep enclosure in rolling hillsides,” incorporating the term “wold” which means “hills.” During the Middle Ages, the area became prosperous from the wool trade with the continent and its wealth can be seen in the ancient churches, historic houses, and other majestic buildings. The gardens and park lands are equally impressive. These assets are what made Cotswolds the representative of the quintessential English countryside. This part of England is not all about tall buildings and vast streets but rather about the old charm of its honey-coloured stone villages that spread on an area more than 160 km, where time seems to move just a little slower amid the hustle and bustle of the rest of the world.

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(via Hidcote Bartrim by flash of light | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

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Hacking out over the Cotswold Hills

There is nothing better than going for a hack out in this beautiful part of the English countryside, at least for me. Especially this time of the year the air is crisp and the early morning is covered in a mist. There is outstanding natural beauty in this part of Gloucestershire. Throughout the many off-road routes I’ve enjoyed magnificent views on miles and miles of paths and bridleways where Muntjack deer, sheep and a plethora of pheasants can be seen.