costume fabrication

My friend learned the hard way to not answer the door to late night trick-or-treaters

by reddit user manen_lyset

We all have that one friend who’s not into the holidays. You know the one: won’t decorate, won’t dress up, won’t wish you a happy -whatever day it is-, and, though he’ll reluctantly agree to come to your themed party, he’ll stay in the back and scowl the whole time. In most cases, the hate is directed at just one holiday, whether it be Valentines, Christmas, Easter, or, hell, even arbor day. My friend Patrick? He hated Halloween with every fiber of his being.

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Why the Linda Cho Snub Stings

And here we go, folks: as promised, my first in a series of critical posts regarding Broadway, culture, and my opinion on the state of theatre today.

Let me preface this post with a clear disclaimer: I am a major fan of Anastasia and have been since the Don Bluth movie came out in 1997. I also understand why Santo Loquasto was selected by the American Theatre Wing as this year’s Tony winner for costume design; I congratulate him heartily, because he is a master of the craft.

But with that out of the way, I disagree with the American Theatre Wing on this award and truly believe that the award should have gone to Linda Cho for her work on Anastasia. I think this honestly was the most upsetting snub for me last night. In some ways, this gets to the heart of another post I made. From an aesthetic standpoint, Linda Cho’s costumes were more visually impressive, more memorable, and more original than those for Hello, Dolly! I’m not alleging any animus in the ATW’s decision, to be clear; it goes more to the somewhat staid, static vision of theatre possessed by the eligible voters.

Now, part of the reason I find the HD costumes uninspiring is because thanks to HD being a revival, there is a kind of need to look to the past productions for inspiration, since the director and producers were not trying to go for some kind of completely original setting (which is fine, for the record!). 

But to my mind, the Best Costume Design category is designed to reward originality and accomplishment, not just improvements on a theme. The costumes that Linda Cho designed for Anastasia manage to have a kind of timeless elegance that grabs the eye and forces you to notice not only the actors, but the costumes themselves. 

Anya’s (Christy Altomare) red and blue gowns from Act II have stuck in my head since the very first stills were released to Playbill ages and ages ago. For visual pops, you cannot beat these (all photos are either from Playbill or other publicly available sources, and are not my property):

Both of these gowns exude a classic elegance that is unrivaled on Broadway today, paying homage to the source material (the high society of the Roaring 20s in Paris, as well as the Russian designs included on the red gown) while still looking fresh. 

The lines on the blue gown in particular are exquisite, and give Christy Altomare (who is not a tall woman) the appearance of added height without it being obvious that is what it’s designed to do.

The costumes for the Romanovs are also elegant, sophisticated, and memorable (I lack a proper still for this that I can attribute to Playbill or Broadway World or Broadway Box and thus the still is drawn from Pinterest; if you are the original photographer, please message me and I will edit this post to credit you). 

For those familiar with the show, you know the ones I mean: the ghostly pearlescent white of Nicholas, Alexandra, and the others slain at the start of the musical. The costumes are graceful, and a good match to many images of the real Romanovs in the era in which the prologue is set. But as with Anya’s gowns…truly, there is a level beyond the simple. I called them “ghostly” for a reason: you can’t look at them without having a terrible sense that these people (innocent for the purposes of the musical) are about to be slain. Linda Cho made funeral shrouds out of ballgowns–and that is a metaphor that works on a huge number of levels.

But you know where Linda Cho really gets me? The costumes for Lily (Caroline O’Connor), Vlad (John Bolton), and Dimitry (Derek Klena). Let’s take each in turn, with just one example per.

This is a Playbill still from the Broadway performance of (I believe) either “Land of Yesterday” or “The Countess and the Common Man”. One of my fellow fanastasias ( @nikolaevna-romanova​ or @anyasdimitry​ perhaps?) can confirm which scene/number.

I’ll focus on Lily for the moment. That gold dress is clearly designed to pop. Lily is a fun, flirty, outrageous character, like her spiritual predecessor in the 1997 film as voiced by the divine Bernadette Peters. Caroline O’Connor brings a downright saucy quality to the character that this gown is designed to highlight. The character is a fallen aristocrat who acts as press secretary/majordomo to the Dowager Empress. She’s supposed to look wealthy–but a kind of shabby wealthy, like someone down on their luck. 

So let’s take a closer look at this Linda Cho masterpiece (via Broadway Box):

The pattern and the cut of the dress are simple–much simpler than would have been worn by the nouveaux-riches of post-war Paris, but still quite elegant and stylish, especially when accented with the lace gloves. But it’s a far cry from the style that Countess Malevsky-Malevitch would have been used to in her old life in imperial St. Petersburg. She’s had to make reductions–but damn if she’s not going to make them work. Linda Cho really captures that perfectly. This dress looks, in addition to being beautiful, like it might have come from a very high end store, but wasn’t custom-made as would have been expected of someone with massive resources. While presenting a memorable dress, Linda Cho stuck to the history: Lily is down on her old circumstances (as the Romanov family was post-Revolution) but she will still Look The Part.

Next, I look at how Linda Cho costumed Vlad Popov, the would-be Count and titular Common Man of the previous number. This still is courtesy of Getty.fr and numerous other news orgs, and is from the Broadway opening night:

It looks pretty fancy, right? It is! But if you look at it closely and in the context of the play, it’s in the same category as Lily’s gold dress. The fabrics are clearly fine, but it’s not a custom tailoring, even though this comes after he is restored to some measure of glory. Linda Cho replicates a rich French brocade for the vest and matches it to the morning coat perfectly (more technically, I believe it’s a stroller, though the term is anachronistic for the year the musical is set). But there’s a reminder to the common-man status in the design of the trousers: leaving them striped, subtly, the way Linda Cho did is a subtle signal that Vlad is not born to wealth–no aristocrat would have styled themselves that way. But he mixes the two styles in a subtle nod to what he is (a commoner) and what he pretends to be (a Count).

Finally, there’s the costuming for Dimitry. Playbill ran this still before opening night, and it’s a perfect one to showcase why Linda Cho was such a genius with her choices:

We know from the musical that Dima is a poor con artist, really not much more than a gutter rat as it were and his costuming matches. The fabrics he wears are rough-hewn and cheap-looking (by intention) because he would never have been able to afford anything else unless he aggressively bartered. As a good man in early Communist Russia, he wouldn’t have had the resources to style himself any better–we get the sense Vlad can only because he had the clothes beforehand. Dimitry is all commoner, all working class, all rough (the same with Anya’s Act I wardrobe).

Now, it’s easy to make a costume look cheap–but Linda Cho does more than that. She makes it look cared for. After all, Dimitry has no resources to replace a winter coat if it’s torn, and so we see that while worn, it’s clearly cared for. His shoulder bag, if a bit out of place in the era, is the same: the leather is time-worn and it’s clearly a possession he has had most of his life. That’s not an easy look to master, and to execute it so flawlessly requires real skill.

Here’s my bottom line. The costumes that Linda Cho designed were bold and innovative, and perfectly matched to the heart and soul of the characters who wore them. They took some risks in the way in which they used colors and fabrics, and they blended some modern sensibilities with the design elements and fabrics of the era the musical is set in. That is the kind of thinking that I feel the American Theatre Wing had a chance to reward with the Tony in 2017, and it’s why I feel disappointed by the snubbing of Linda Cho. Her costumes weren’t groundbreaking, but they were unique, they were original, and above all, they felt like they improved the overall quality of the show for their presence.

I doubt Linda Cho will ever read this, but if she does: you own the Tony in my mind, and I cannot wait to see what you come up with for the next show lucky enough to hire you to design their costumes.

shitter  asked:

Kind of a weirdly specific question to ask, but do you have any advice for drawing leather biker-style jackets? I notice you draw them in a lot of your stuff and they always turn out great. I have a male OC that wears one and I can always get the top part/collar right but something about the bottom and the way it's supposed to sort of interact with/hang off of the torso while unzipped is really weird to draw and I always end up making it like hug the skin in weird ways. Adore your art btw!!

Hi! Sorry late reply. I love costuming and I wanted to answer this properly.

I A D O R E leather jackets/biker jackets. And a lot of my understanding of jackets comes from knowing how real leather works vs fake leather/pleather/vinyl. Leather is generally very heavy. So its not going to fold or lay the same way a regular jacket or even vinyl will lay. 

So first stop REFERENCE! If you own a leather jacket or a biker jacket try that thing on and look at it in the mirror. Then look at what its doing to your clothes/undergarments. 

If you don’t own a leather jacket (like a lot of people lol. I own a fake one from forever 21) google or pinterest! Pinterest is both a blessing and a curse. Its a curse for unsourcing artists BUT is a REALLY good way to put together visual research quickly. I just used google for this so here’s some pics I thought were useful 

So a thing to remember is typically people wear light clothes under leather jackets. Real leather like I said is very thick with an intent to protect as well as look just dang cool. Ewan is an avid bike rider so he’s usually wearing it for bike purposes. Wearing a big sweater or a flouncy shirt under a leather jacket is just going to be uncomfortable.

Leather and fake leather typically hang straight down unless they’ve got a belt at the bottom to cinch in.

So going off of your question about how it would hang it basically would hang straight down and a little away falling off of the chest muscles. Depending on whether the jacket is a very form fitting jacket or if its k inda loose to begin with will add to that as well.

So you’ve got your reference here’s a very minimal tutorial. There’s a lot about fabric and costume drawing theory I’m skipping over.

But typically for any sort of costume. Understanding the form underneath is important. You can fudge it later once you’ve got enough practice at it but its more believeable to just lay in a sketch or a light drawing of the figure on its own. You don’t have to go crazy into detail just remember where the bigger or muscles that are interacting are. 

And then on another layer or if you’re using the same sketch layer draw in that jacket.

Points to remember is where is the fabric being stressed/stretched. Where is interacting with the form. Remember that bottom hems typically move out and up if the arms are outstretched. Even if its zipped the rest of the jacket will still move even if its minimally.  An open jacket is fun to play with with action so don’t be afraid to fake it a little. Don’t go to town on the wrinkles because Leather is a heavy fabric and while it will remember wrinkles in elbows typically it just sorta hangs there. There’s always folds on the sleeves or where the body bends. Don’t forget the details so if it has a zipper remember that zippers have two parts. Buttons and seams are going to make it a more believable leather jacket. 

Example if you’re drawing jeans as opposed to suit pants jeans have reinforced seams because they’re originally intended for heavy duty work where as a suit is typically worn in an office so the seams are cleaner and often hidden. Leather jackets fit into the first group like jeans and since the fabric is so heavy seams are pretty obvious and prominent. Buttons are typically big because they have to penetrate through the heaviness of the jacket. Even fake leather jackets have big buttons/zippers/seams to replicate the look of an authentic leather jacket.


I think that’s the short and skinny of it without getting into a 14 week class on fabric lol. Hope that helps!!

the-glass-heart  asked:

What is the average low, average, and high cost of a skating costume? And/all interesting things of mention that might pertain therein?

Skating costumes early in your career tend to be much less expensive, in the $200-$1000 range, depending on if they’re custom made, what fabric is used, how complicated the design is, and amount of beading. Younger skaters often buy gently used costumes at club-sponsored sales, because they grow so fast.

Olympic/World-class skater’s costumes range from $1000-$5000 each, depending on what designer, how complicated the construction of the costume is (fabric, mesh, weird design etc). and of course, how much beading. So, skaters are dropping about $10,000-$15,000 USD on costumes for every season (gotta have that exhibition outfit too!)

Designers often work with skaters to create a costume. After listening to the music, they sketch a few designs. Every skater has preferences (separate pieces, body suit, skirt fabric, sleeves, no sleeves, gloves etc). and costumes are constructed to fit exact proportions with seams that are reinforced to be flexible AND especially durable. 

Sometimes a designer is NOT the person/team that actually sews your costume, so if they have a team of stitches, your costume is going to be more expensive. 

Here’s an article from the last Olympics that talks about costumes and has an interview with one of the popular designers. 

Fun Costume Facts (A Lot are Ignored by Ficcers):

There are actually ISU regulations regarding costumes. And you can lose points for violating them. I wrote a post about them here. (Memo: Yuuri and Victor must be much more clothed than they often appear in some writers descriptions. Yurio couldn’t wear his exhibition outfit for a competition).

Almost all mesh is LINED to prevent it from warping and stretching when it is professionally cleaned. Men sometimes get away without it, but tend to have it anyway…it’s COLD out there. So, no, Yuuri probs doesn’t actually have his skin showing under that Eros mesh…but he might.

Men wear dance belts under their costumes to support/secure their junk. None of the male characters are going totally commando under their costumes, regardless of what you want to happen afterwards. Women are wearing tights, but often wear no underwear (or a thong), because the panty line would show and they have “bras” built into the costumes. 

Skating costumes can get wet (almost all bases are waterproof material due to those falls) but they aren’t machine washable because of the beading. Beading is applied BY HAND. And most of the money is going to the time spent by the designer/stitchers laying down your crystals. If they are Swarovski rhinestones, you are racking up a huge bill (i.e. probably Victor). 

The warm-up jackets are used to keep the skaters muscles warm, since it’s bad for you to warm up, skate and then let your muscles “get stiff” and “be cold” suddenly. But they jackets are ALSO used to protect their costumes. It’s why you rarely see a skater walking around without one at a competition before or after they leave the ice. Smelly sweat is easy to clean out…stains…not so much. Also: you really wanna have to have those rhinestones replaced?

Exhibition costume aren’t always made by designers and skaters often wear old costumes or put something together themselves that fits the routine, depending on what they are skating to. 

Gloves used to be frowned upon and considered ugly because they ruin the line of your hand (and they do and they are). They became more common with the advent of the CoP because elements with blade-grabbing earned more points. 

Hope that helps!

BANDANA - Jamaica’s National Fabric and Folk Costume

Bandana cloth originated in far off Chennai, in Eastern India. However this light, inexpensive and cool cloth became a symbol of Jamaican national culture after the 1940’s. Bandana’s plaid patterns and colours along with several other symbols became associated with the traditions and heritage of the ordinary Jamaican people.

Prior to that, Bandana has long been associated with Jamaican working women. When India fell under almost complete British control in the 19th Century, the Madras cloth trade proved a cheap fabric for enslaved and Black working class women in the Caribbean. The cloth, however, was worn as a mark of pride and distinction, particularly among market vendors. 

#RespectDUE!!!

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The Wishing fabric, designed by a husband-and-wife team in the UK, has been used for Christine’s blue Wishing dress since 1986, and is still in use. It has also been used in other movies and TV series; for example in Dangerous Liaisons (1988), The Piano (1993), Forsyte Saga (2002) and Lincoln (2012).

But the inspiration is floral/stripy fabrics from the mid and late 18th century, where this style was at its height. The Rococo fabrics were woven with threads in different colours, and usually featured alternating stripes and floral girlands or ranks of flower. Red/rust/pink is reoccuring colours, but blye, green and white was also popular. The mid/late 19th century got a Rococo revival in art, architecture and fashion, the latter sparked by designer Worth, which is why this type of fabric also got a revival, and why it appears in Christine’s Wishing dress.

Here’s some examples (credit in captions), along with the Wishing fabric.

youtube

Here’s another series I’ll be doing on and off: Quickie Tutorials!

Small, fun, yet informative tutorials between the lengthy ones.

Today I’m showing you how to create beautiful velvet roses from scratch! I’m creating these roses as an embellishment for the Belle gown I’m making this year.

Remember to Like and Subscribe!

The Same Costume

Request:  Hello! I was wondering if you could make a drabble for peter parker x reader where its halloween and reader and her friends dress up as “sexy” avengers and she’s dressed up as spiderman? You can do whatever relationship status with pete, whether it be crushes or girlfriend, etc…. thank you so much!

Warnings: None!!

Pairing: Female Reader x Peter Parker

Genre: Fluff

Word Count: 1.6k

A/N: THIS IS SO BAD PLS DONT FIGHT ME I’ve been so busy and nothing was coming to me so I tried my best :’)

This is just kinda something to break up my mini hiatus so I’m not going to add the tags to this one !! (p.s 70 days until Halloween)

“Peter, would you stop spacing out and pay attention to me for a second?” Ned’s voice snapped Peter out of his daydream and he quickly looked up to see he best friend waving at him. Ned had been going on and on about his project for Robotics Lab so eventually Peter had just tuned him out.

“Yeah, yeah,” he said. “I am paying attention. What’s up?” Ned let out a long sigh and pointed over to the group of girls standing in the lunch line. Peter noticed almost immediately that you were one of the members of the group and averted his eyes. You looked really nice today with your hair pulled back and he felt his face begin to heat up.

“I heard that there’s going to be an awesome Halloween party at Bethany’s house tonight. Y/N is friends with her so I was thinking we could ask her to score us some invites?” Ned explained. You, Ned, and Peter had American Literature together and all got along really well. You had your other friends, of course, but you also liked to hang out with the two of them whenever you could. You had a lot of things in common with them surprisingly, and Peter felt a connection with you right away. He had developed quite the crush on you, although you were oblivious to it.

“I don’t know, Ned,” he said, pushing the thoughts out of his mind. “Parties aren’t really our thing.”

“But Y/N will be there!” he exclaimed. “We haven’t seen her outside of school in so long. Besides, it’s a costume party. You know how much I love those!”

“Fine,” Peter finally gave in, “but you have to be the one to ask her.” Ned beamed and waited until you looked in their direction before flailing his arms around to get your attention. You laughed, quickly excusing yourself to go and talk to him.

“Hey guys,” you said with a grin. “What’s going on? If you’re gonna ask to copy my English homework you’re out of luck because I didn’t do it either.” Peter’s heart rate was doubling as each moment passed, and he tried his best not to stare.

“Actually, it’s about Bethany’s party!” Ned piped up. “Are you going to be there?”

“I sure am!” you replied. “My friends and I are all coordinating our costumes, it’s gonna be fun. Are you two going? It would be so great to see you there.”

“W-we don’t have an official invite,” Peter stammered. Your smile grew even wider, making his stomach flip.

“Well then, consider this it,” you laughed. “You have to go in costume though. It’s a tradition and, as weird as it seems, you’d stick out more if you weren’t wearing something dumb.” The bell rang as you finished, cutting your conversation short. You waved goodbye to them, leaving Peter staring after you in awe. He couldn’t believe that he was actually going through with this. He could vaguely hear Ned babbling endlessly about last minute costume ideas, but he was only half listening since you were occupying all of his thoughts.


Peter had no idea how he found himself standing at the front door of some random girl’s house wearing a Luke Skywalker costume later that night, but for some reason he did. He turned to Ned, who was dressed as a very unconvincing Yoda. He was a jumble of nerves, feeling extremely self conscious, meanwhile Ned was having the time of his life. It was finally an excuse for him to whip out his Star Wars merchandise and he couldn’t have been more excited. Peter reached out and hesitantly rang the doorbell, already regretting every decision he had made thus far. His breath caught in his throat when you were the one to answer the door.

“Peter! Ned! I’m so glad you guys made it!” you exclaimed happily. Peter couldn’t help but stare, his jaw dropping. You were wearing a skin tight Spider-Man body suit with thigh-high boots, showing off every single one of your assets. Your eyes gleamed from behind your small mask and Peter noticed the slight tinge of pink on your cheeks. He suddenly realized that he had been staring shamelessly and tore his eyes away, embarrassed.

“H-hi Y/N,” he said, trying to keep things casual. “Nice costume. I uh… I didn’t know you liked Spider-Man. That’s cool, he seems like a good guy.” Ned nudged him a little, and Peter quickly stopped talking.

“Oh, yeah,” you laughed. “My idea was that my friends and I should go as the Avengers, but as you can see they took it a little differently. Technically I don’t think Spider-Man counts, but I really like him so that’s who I picked. I think it turned out pretty cute, you like it?”

“Y-yeah I think it’s… nice,” Peter squeaked. He cleared his throat, cringing at his own awkwardness. You giggled and let them inside, leading them into the kitchen. You were talking with Ned about something relating to The Force Awakens, but Peter couldn’t focus. He was totally distracted by the way you walked, the way your outfit accentuated your curves, and just generally how fantastic you looked in the Spider-Man suit. His suit. Well, something similar to it at least.

“What do you think Peter?” you asked, looking at him expectantly. He froze, not having any idea what you had been talking about. His mind went blank and he started to panic a little.

“Sorry, could you excuse me for a second?” he said breathlessly, turning and rushing past you.

“I should probably go after him,” Ned said to you as you watched him leave. “Parties aren’t really his thing. We’ll be back in a little bit.” He went off in pursuit of his friend, already knowing exactly what was going on. Peter found an unoccupied room and ducked inside, running his hands through his hair. He jumped when the door opened, but relaxed when he saw it was Ned. They stood in silence for a moment, just sort of letting him cool down.

“Peter, you have to tell her you’re Spider-Man!” Ned blurted out.

“Shh!” Peter gave him a severe look and looked around nervously. “What if somebody hears you?”

“But this is the perfect time!” he whined. “You heard her, she really likes you! Besides, you haven’t taken your eyes off of her ass since we got here. You have to make a move.”

“You’re crazy,” Peter said, although he had to admit he was considering it. Ned noticed this and his face lit up.

“I’ll tell her to meet you outside down the road in 5 minutes. Now’s your chance, Parker! Don’t blow it.” He ran out of the room, leaving Peter there with really no other options. He fumbled with his costume, pulling the suit out from his backpack that he never left home without. With the suit on he felt a lot more sure of himself and carefully climbed out the window quietly. From up on the roof he could see you walking outside, shivering a little in the cold October air. You stumbled a bit, still not used to walking in your heels. Peter smiled as he watched you go. He slowly followed, careful not to make his presence known.

“Hello?” you called, a little on edge since it had already gotten pretty dark. You tugged nervously on your costume, the tight fabric starting to chafe a little. Peter took a deep breath and built up the confidence to say something.

“Uh… hi,” he said, trying to pose in a non-creepy way as if he hadn’t been following her.

“Oh, you’re here!” you exclaimed as you whirled around but stopped dead when you saw it was Spider-Man. It wasn’t even one of those cheap costumes, it was the actual Spider-Man. You recognized all of the details of the suit, details that couldn’t be replicated. Your eyes widened and you quickly pulled the mask that you wore off.

“I-I think that’s one hell of a costume,” he said. “I’m not sure if I’d wear it, but the effort was there.”

“Sorry, is this weird for you? I mean, I bet it is. I didn’t mean for it to be offensive but I also wasn’t really expecting to see Spider-Man out here, you know? I can take it off. No, actually I can’t that would make it so much worse.” you rambled nervously. Behind his mask Peter couldn’t have been smiling any wider. Seeing you so flustered and shocked was really cute and he was loving it.

“I’m not offended at all, it’s the opposite really,” he laughed. “Why are you out here all by yourself without a jacket?”

“I’m actually waiting for someone,” you told him. “He’s great. He’s in my class and we’re friends but I want to ask him if he wants to go out- Oh wait, sorry you probably don’t care about that part. Forget I said that.” Now it was Peter’s turn to be flustered. 

“No, no it’s fine! Do you… Do you like him?”

“I mean, a little,” you admitted. “Don’t tell him, okay? Not that you would, you’re Spider-Man, but still.” Peter nodded slowly, taking a step back.

“Your secret is safe with me,” he said. “I have to go, I think I hear someone calling for help…” He looked behind his shoulder, pretending to pick up on something.

“I don’t hear anything,” you said curiously.

“No, trust me. Someone’s having a bad night, I should go help. Good luck with that Peter guy, I’m sure he’s nice. Hope things work out.” With that, he shot off into the trees leaving you there alone. You flipped your mask over in your hands, trying to ignore the fact that you had never mentioned Peter’s name to him and that Spider-Man had a very similar voice.

10

I’ve put all of the fabric painting tutorials into one big photo post.

Includes silk painting with resist (Elven Banner), free-hand painting on stretch fabrics (Jareth from Labyrinth), fake embroidery with puffy paint (Peter of Narnia), graphite transfer paper with fabric paint pens (Tali from Mass Effect) and regular Tulip fabric paint (TARDIS lab coat).

Maybe this format is better?

ART MASTERPOST - A great selection of art resources form around the web.

Software

My Personal Selections:

  • Fireworks - From Adobe, but my go-to app for graphics. It fuses bitmap and vector art in on amazing package.
  • Autodesk Sketchbook Pro - Super iPad paint app

The Others

  • Alchemy - Fun for abstract shapes.
  • Brushes - One of the first, pro level paint apps for the iPad.
  • MyPaint - a good art app for unix/linux systems.
  • Queeky - A free, browser-based image app.
  • Procreate - An awesome paint tool for the iPad
  • The GIMP - An open source art app that is good and very similar to Adobe Fireworks.
  • Inkscape - Vector/drawing program meant to be similar to Illustrator.
  • DAZ Studio - 3D modeling.
  • Pixlr - A suite of web-based art apps from Autodesk.
  • Photoshop - The gold standard, but not the best graphics app. Mostly great for bitmaps.
  • Illustrator - The king of the hill in terms of vector art applications.

Anatomy

  • heads from different angles
  • anatomy and rotation of the head
  • human anatomy for artists
  • speed drawing studies
  • nude references
  • hands
  • arm and wing movement 
  • beer belliesbody types
  • noses
  • box and egg/run of the stroke
  • a trick for armproportions
  • body diversity
  • anatomy of the waist
  • feet
  • hands and forearms

Color Theory

  • the psychology of color
  • how to mix skin tones
  • color harmony
  • a ton of colour palettes
  • how to contour/highlight
  • colour meanings
  • how to colour

Drawing

  • Drawing facial expressions
  • Arms (male and female)
  • Kissing
  • Drawing faces tutorial
  • Drawing ears
  • Drawing eyes
  • Drawing hair
  • Draw a 3D room
  • Drawing lips
  • Drawing jeans
  • Drawing hands
  • Drawing wings
  • Drawing hats and other head accessories
  • Drawing heads
  • Drawing the booty and thighs

Expressions

  • emotions and facial expressions
  • expressions from different angles (love this site)
  • body language

Poses

  • figure drawing examples
  • posemaniacs
  • gesture drawing 
  • flexiblity
  • hand poses

Skin tones

  • handy palletpainting skin
  • paint some life into your skin tones
  • ethnic skintones

Color Technique

  • gamut mask tool (very nice!)
  • colour does not have to suck
  • 5 easy ways to improve your colouring
  • fucking gradients, how do they work
  • light and shadow
  • painting crystals
  • achieving a painterly look in SAI 
  • painting forests
  • colour scheme designer
  • kuler (more colour schemes)
  • portrait lighting cheatsheet

Tutorials

  • drawing 101
  • how to paint realistic hair
  • how to paint realistic eyes
  • conceptart.org tutorials
  • creature design
  • folds
  • glasses
  • a pretty extensive general art tutorial
  • how to draw hoods
  • how to draw boobs in shirts
  • how to draw hair
  • how to draw faces
  • another face tutorial
  • how to draw hands
  • how to draw mouths
  • how to draw expressions
  • more expressions
  • cargsdoodle’s body tutorial
  • how to draw arms
  • how to avoid same facing
  • how to draw clothing folds

references

  • drawing references
  • hairstyle references
  • eye references
  • a ton of clothing references
  • ear references
  • kneeling/sitting references
  • kissing references

 

Feline tutorials:

  • The domestic cat body
  • Improving upon (lion) anatomy
  • Realistic lion faces tips
  • Big cat paw tips
  • Canine vs. feline - paws and legs
  • Beginner feline tutorial
  • Guide to big cats
  • Feline comparison
  • Canine vs. feline - facial anatomy
  • Canine vs. feline - chest anatomy
  • Guide to little cats
  • Big cat eyes (could work for other eyes)
  • Spot variation in big cats
  • Big cat studies
  • Feline feet
  • Extremely helpful big cat references
  • Domestic cat references

Canine tutorials:

  • Basic wolf anatomy
  • Skeleton notes on wolf legs
  • The wolf skeleton as a whole
  • The wolf skull and teeth
  • Wolf paw tips
  • Basic canine poses
  • Canine ears and chest
  • Drawing realistic wolves
  • Basic wolf tutorial
  • Wolf paw tutorial
  • Paw pad tips
  • Wolf fur direction
  • Canine vs. feline - paws and legs
  • Canine vs. feline - facial anatomy
  • Canine vs. feline - chest anatomy
  • And this is just an excellent DA for wolf reference images
  • Fluid greyhound studies
  • Detailed canine nose tutorial

Avian tutorials:

  • Bird wing anatomy applied on humanoids
  • Bird wing tutorial (lots of underrated tips)
  • Varying bird wing structure
  • Basic owl anatomy
  • Bird wing vs. bat wing vs. pterodactyl wing vs. human arm
  • Bird wings and flight
  • Various bird wings
  • Eagle facts sheet
  • Bird muscular and skeletal anatomy
  • Some great photograph bird (wing) references
  • Dorsal anatomy of a bird wing
  • Winged people anatomy

Human(oid) tutorials:

Facial features:

  • Excellent expressions tut
  • Altalamatox face tutorial
  • Profile proportions
  • Expression tutorial
  • Virtual lighting studio
  • Various facial and body shapes reference
  • Drawing the nose
  • Human mouths
  • Breaking down the human nose
  • How to draw the ear
  • Jawline and kissing tip
  • The human head at various angles
  • Advice on eyes
  • Nose shapes
  • The human skull and face
  • Facial features
  • Portrait lighting cheat sheet
  • Animating dialogue (mouth movement)
  • A kissing tutorial
  • Expressions photo references
  • Semi-realistic eye tutorial
  • Painting a realistic eye
  • The face in profile
  • The human head at various angles
  • Muscles in the neck and face
  • Breakdown of lips
  • Blocked out human faces
  • Average female faces of the world
  • Expressive eye reference
  • Excellent ear anatomy tutorial
  • Constraining the face
  • The face at various angles
  • Human faces
  • Skull to face tutorial
  • Excellent teeth tutorial. Animalistic, but it works
  • Tips on teeth
  • Colours of the face
  • Photographic mouth/teeth reference
  • Stylized noses and ears

Neck, shoulders, arms, back, and torso:

  • A male shoulder study
  • Muscles in the neck and face
  • Neck and torso tut
  • Male torso anatomy in use
  • Arm shape and muscles
  • Breaking up the male torso
  • Female anatomy patterns
  • Male torso photo reference
  • Over the shoulder poses
  • Shoulder structure (male)
  • Male torso in motion
  • A neat arm trick
  • Detailed arm muscle drawings
  • Male muscle reference
  • Human back tips
  • Movement and muscles of the neck, torso, and arms
  • Simplifying a muscular male torso
  • Drawing boobs
  • Female vs male arms and shoulders
  • Making sure ladies have room for organs and realistic boobs
  • Shoulders vs hips
  • Hands on hips poses
  • Muscles of the arms and shoulders (in motion)
  • Varied male and female torso references

Legs, hips, and feet:

  • Male vs. female waist
  • Female anatomy patterns
  • The human hips
  • Male legs reference
  • A beginner’s guide to knees
  • Feet and shoes tutorial
  • Simplifying the human foot
  • Feet reference drawings
  • Feet, ankles, and shoes
  • Shoulders vs hips
  • Bent legs yes and no’s (female)
  • Hands and feet from cone shapes

Hands:

  • Hand tips and reference
  • Simplifying hands
  • More simplified hands
  • The human hand
  • More hand(y) tips
  • Yet another hands tutorial
  • The fist
  • The hand in motion
  • Hand and feet tips
  • Excellent hand and feet studies
  • How hands grip a sword
  • Hand poses
  • Boxing out the hand
  • Hello more hand refs
  • Hand angle references
  • Correct grip on a pistol
  • Various hand references (with object holding poses)
  • Simple hands, fingers, and nails
  • Hands and feet from cone shapes

Full body and poses:

  • Simplifying human anatomy
  • Understanding anatomy part 1 (follow desc. links for more)
  • A guide to movement: flexibility
  • Pose tutorial
  • Varying the female figure
  • Excellent action and couple references
  • Various athletic builds
  • Proportional height of different positions
  • The human body in perspective
  • Body type diversity
  • Another ladies tutorial
  • Fullbody proportions tutorial
  • Guide to human types
  • Couple pose photo references
  • Practice figure drawing (animals as well)
  • How weight sits on different (female) bodies
  • Kneeling and sitting stock references
  • Constructing poses and the line of action
  • Varying your body types (female)
  • Large source of female anatomy references

Hair and skin:

  • Various types of hair
  • Drawing hair
  • Skintone palettes
  • Variation of colour throughout the skin
  • Painting skin
  • Skin tutorial
  • Skin undertones (men)
  • Drawing freckles
  • Drawing different types of hair

Other:

  • Bird wing anatomy applied on humanoids
  • Animal feet on a human figure
  • Various human bone studies
  • Interesting mythical creature skeletons with humanoid anatomy
  • Winged people anatomy

Dragon tutorials (and bat wings):

  • Anatomy of the Western dragon
  • Dragon wing tips
  • Dragon wing tutorial
  • Dragon anatomy
  • Dragon tutorial
  • Bat wing anatomy tutorial

Equine tutorials:

  • Basic horse (back) reference
  • The equine skeleton
  • Horse anatomy and pointers
  • A good, large collection of horse stock references
  • Skeleton of a horse and its rider
  • Horse hooves
  • Skeletal and fluid horse studies

Cervine tutorials:

  • Basic deer anatomy
  • Deer skeleton drawing
  • Deer musculature
  • Deer skeleton
  • Fluid deer studies
  • The Big Book of Drawing: deer
  • Reindeer noses

Ursine tutorials:

  • Fantastic bear anatomy/poses references
  • Basic bear structure
  • Bear anatomy tutorial

Miscellaneous animal tutorials:

  • Sheep vs. goats
  • Anteater studies
  • Chimp studies
  • Asian elephant skeletal drawing
  • Animating four legged creatures
  • Various animal studies from an animation aspect
  • Drawing rats
  • A tutorial on creature design
  • Snake mouths
  • Amazing teeth tutorial

Background and objects tutorials:

  • Griffsnuff background tut part 1 (second in desc.)
  • Tree tutorial
  • Realistic gems tut
  • Water tutorial
  • General water tutorial
  • Drawing crystals
  • Drawing bows
  • Painting rocks
  • Parts of a saber (other swords linked in desc.)
  • Analyzing key and contrast/time of day/etc
  • Corner-pin perspective distortion
  • Using three cubes to make a street view
  • Cloud tutorial
  • A beautiful flower tutorial
  • A simple but effective tree tutorial
  • Drawing mechanical objects
  • Multiple tree tutorials
  • Perspective tricks
  • Weapon and shield accessory tutorial
  • Background painting tips (blocks and angular objects)

Clothing tutorials:

  • Fabric tutorial
  • Clothing folds part 1 (second in desc.)
  • Drawing hoods
  • Drawing jeans
  • Hat on human figure reference
  • Armor
  • More hat on figure references
  • Different shirt collars
  • Collars, sport backs, vests, and pants
  • Draperies and costumes
  • Making colourful fabric patterns
  • Baseball cap reference
  • A ton of clothing references
  • A boatload of well-organized clothing refs
  • Feet and shoes tutorial
  • Dressing Rosalind Lutece (older female clothing)
  • Feet, ankles, and shoes
  • Hats and how to draw them
  • Clothing folds tutorial
  • Drawing clothing wrinkles
  • A breakdown of medieval armor
  • Drawing hoods

General painting, drawing, and style tips:

  • Altalamatox digital painting walkthrough
  • Simple fur tutorial
  • Realism painting tutorial (human subject)
  • Excellent colour tutorial
  • Painting a wolf (good fur painting visual)
  • Photoshop brushes tut
  • Basics of Photoshop tutorial
  • Another digital painting tutorial
  • Common digital painting mistakes
  • Colour and light
  • Soft cel-shading tutorial
  • Various types of hair
  • Colour tips and the mood it expresses
  • Composition tips
  • Lighting and colour tips
  • Shadows
  • Another composition tut
  • Simple colouring via overlay
  • From paper to digital
  • Painting gold
  • Colour palette turtles
  • Excellent fur painting tutorial
  • Skin painting tips
  • Colouring black and white pictures
  • Creating a colour palette with MS Paint
  • Obeying screen direction
  • Analyzing key and contrast/time of day/etc
  • The coil technique
  • Colour adjustment tips
  • Making flat colour pieces look gorgeous
  • Blending with hard brushes
  • Outlining in SAI
  • Uncommon information regarding colours
  • Compositional balance
  • Visual algorithms
  • Gesture over anatomy
  • Disney Chris Sanders’ style tips
  • Design, colour, and value
  • Decent art without lining or shading
  • Varied shots of the human figure
  • Cinematography of the Incredibles
  • Giving characters personality with poses and expressions
  • The main shapes of character design
  • Tamberella’s shading tutorial
  • SAI watercolour tutorial
  • Choosing interesting colours (by PurpleKecleon)
  • Local colour and dramatic lighting
  • Silhouettes and line of action

Hand and wrist health:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome information
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome exercises
  • Wrist, hand, and finger stretches video
  • Another video with good hand exercises

pffffuahhhd finally getting around to uploading this thing I did at work last month!!!!

Here’s a little before/after shot of the fabric I painted for the WNO’s Spring 2017 production of Dead Man Walking, with costumes designed by Jessica Jahn!! This printed polyester knit fabric was used for the blouse worn by the character Jade Boucher. It took a lot of samples and experimenting to come up with a combination that would permeate through the knit when applied and remain wash fast, but it worked out in the end!

I painted in 4 yards by hand, used 4 different colors, and including the heat setting this process took about 80 hours to complete. No stencils or stamps were used; all applied colors were free handed on with a paintbrush.