costume fabrication

shitter  asked:

Kind of a weirdly specific question to ask, but do you have any advice for drawing leather biker-style jackets? I notice you draw them in a lot of your stuff and they always turn out great. I have a male OC that wears one and I can always get the top part/collar right but something about the bottom and the way it's supposed to sort of interact with/hang off of the torso while unzipped is really weird to draw and I always end up making it like hug the skin in weird ways. Adore your art btw!!

Hi! Sorry late reply. I love costuming and I wanted to answer this properly.

I A D O R E leather jackets/biker jackets. And a lot of my understanding of jackets comes from knowing how real leather works vs fake leather/pleather/vinyl. Leather is generally very heavy. So its not going to fold or lay the same way a regular jacket or even vinyl will lay. 

So first stop REFERENCE! If you own a leather jacket or a biker jacket try that thing on and look at it in the mirror. Then look at what its doing to your clothes/undergarments. 

If you don’t own a leather jacket (like a lot of people lol. I own a fake one from forever 21) google or pinterest! Pinterest is both a blessing and a curse. Its a curse for unsourcing artists BUT is a REALLY good way to put together visual research quickly. I just used google for this so here’s some pics I thought were useful 

So a thing to remember is typically people wear light clothes under leather jackets. Real leather like I said is very thick with an intent to protect as well as look just dang cool. Ewan is an avid bike rider so he’s usually wearing it for bike purposes. Wearing a big sweater or a flouncy shirt under a leather jacket is just going to be uncomfortable.

Leather and fake leather typically hang straight down unless they’ve got a belt at the bottom to cinch in.

So going off of your question about how it would hang it basically would hang straight down and a little away falling off of the chest muscles. Depending on whether the jacket is a very form fitting jacket or if its k inda loose to begin with will add to that as well.

So you’ve got your reference here’s a very minimal tutorial. There’s a lot about fabric and costume drawing theory I’m skipping over.

But typically for any sort of costume. Understanding the form underneath is important. You can fudge it later once you’ve got enough practice at it but its more believeable to just lay in a sketch or a light drawing of the figure on its own. You don’t have to go crazy into detail just remember where the bigger or muscles that are interacting are. 

And then on another layer or if you’re using the same sketch layer draw in that jacket.

Points to remember is where is the fabric being stressed/stretched. Where is interacting with the form. Remember that bottom hems typically move out and up if the arms are outstretched. Even if its zipped the rest of the jacket will still move even if its minimally.  An open jacket is fun to play with with action so don’t be afraid to fake it a little. Don’t go to town on the wrinkles because Leather is a heavy fabric and while it will remember wrinkles in elbows typically it just sorta hangs there. There’s always folds on the sleeves or where the body bends. Don’t forget the details so if it has a zipper remember that zippers have two parts. Buttons and seams are going to make it a more believable leather jacket. 

Example if you’re drawing jeans as opposed to suit pants jeans have reinforced seams because they’re originally intended for heavy duty work where as a suit is typically worn in an office so the seams are cleaner and often hidden. Leather jackets fit into the first group like jeans and since the fabric is so heavy seams are pretty obvious and prominent. Buttons are typically big because they have to penetrate through the heaviness of the jacket. Even fake leather jackets have big buttons/zippers/seams to replicate the look of an authentic leather jacket.


I think that’s the short and skinny of it without getting into a 14 week class on fabric lol. Hope that helps!!

9

The Wishing fabric, designed by a husband-and-wife team in the UK, has been used for Christine’s blue Wishing dress since 1986, and is still in use. It has also been used in other movies and TV series; for example in Dangerous Liaisons (1988), The Piano (1993), Forsyte Saga (2002) and Lincoln (2012).

But the inspiration is floral/stripy fabrics from the mid and late 18th century, where this style was at its height. The Rococo fabrics were woven with threads in different colours, and usually featured alternating stripes and floral girlands or ranks of flower. Red/rust/pink is reoccuring colours, but blye, green and white was also popular. The mid/late 19th century got a Rococo revival in art, architecture and fashion, the latter sparked by designer Worth, which is why this type of fabric also got a revival, and why it appears in Christine’s Wishing dress.

Here’s some examples (credit in captions), along with the Wishing fabric.

pffffuahhhd finally getting around to uploading this thing I did at work last month!!!!

Here’s a little before/after shot of the fabric I painted for the WNO’s Spring 2017 production of Dead Man Walking, with costumes designed by Jessica Jahn!! This printed polyester knit fabric was used for the blouse worn by the character Jade Boucher. It took a lot of samples and experimenting to come up with a combination that would permeate through the knit when applied and remain wash fast, but it worked out in the end!

I painted in 4 yards by hand, used 4 different colors, and including the heat setting this process took about 80 hours to complete. No stencils or stamps were used; all applied colors were free handed on with a paintbrush.

youtube

Here’s another series I’ll be doing on and off: Quickie Tutorials!

Small, fun, yet informative tutorials between the lengthy ones.

Today I’m showing you how to create beautiful velvet roses from scratch! I’m creating these roses as an embellishment for the Belle gown I’m making this year.

Remember to Like and Subscribe!

10

I’ve put all of the fabric painting tutorials into one big photo post.

Includes silk painting with resist (Elven Banner), free-hand painting on stretch fabrics (Jareth from Labyrinth), fake embroidery with puffy paint (Peter of Narnia), graphite transfer paper with fabric paint pens (Tali from Mass Effect) and regular Tulip fabric paint (TARDIS lab coat).

Maybe this format is better?

Me:*looking at list of stuff left to do for a costume* Ok, I have three weeks before the con, and things are looking good. If I work a little every day I’ll be ready with a week to spare! I’ve never had a costume done early before! This feels great!

Brain: Hey, you know what you could do?

Me: Shut up, brain.

Brain: ANOTHER COSTUME.

Me: *siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiighs and starts planning it out*

My friend learned the hard way to not answer the door to late night trick-or-treaters

by reddit user manen_lyset

We all have that one friend who’s not into the holidays. You know the one: won’t decorate, won’t dress up, won’t wish you a happy -whatever day it is-, and, though he’ll reluctantly agree to come to your themed party, he’ll stay in the back and scowl the whole time. In most cases, the hate is directed at just one holiday, whether it be Valentines, Christmas, Easter, or, hell, even arbor day. My friend Patrick? He hated Halloween with every fiber of his being.

Keep reading

In the episode 4x09 (”Pulling Strings”) Queen Mary wears this gold lace dress and veil made by Reign Costume department. The fabrics were supplied by Fabriluxe and the gorgeous embellishment on the bodice was hand embroidered by Laurie Lemelin of Abrash Embroidery.

Worn with a Paris by Debra Moreland custom headpiece, Alfredo Laggia custom necklace and earrings, Gillian Steinhardt ‘Lover’ ring and a pair of Rene Caovilla pumps.

HQ stills are from @ffaupdates, pictures of embroidery are from @abrashembroidery on Instagram.

youtube

Fabric: the bread of the cosplay world. You can laden it with your beads, lace, and trims like any great BLT, but your fabric is the foundation of your costume sandwich. And just like with bread, we all have our favorite kinds! Whether you like melonpan or minky, taftan or taffeta, pumpernickel or poplin, or maybe something more exotic like cauliflower pizza crust or “crêpe” de chine, cosplay introduces us all to a wide variety of fabric types. And after ten years, here’s a video counting down my personal favorites I’ve gotten to use while making costumes!

youtube

Hi Friends! Today I’d love to share with you a new tutorial video. This time we are going to learn how to untangle and remove the shine of a cheap Halloween costume wig. This tutorial is very easy you just need some fabric softener (Suavitel), warm water and baby powder ♥.

telegraph.co.uk
Queen Elizabeth I’s long-lost skirt to go on display after being found on a church altar in Herefordshire
A piece of fabric described as the Holy Grail of fashion history will become one of the star attractions at Hampton Court Palace after it was identified as the only surviving piece of clothing worn by Elizabeth I.

Ecstatic news for historic costumers.   Surviving dress fabrics are very rare, precisely because they got remade until they were no longer useful.  However, a common use of old valuable fabric was to be made into vestments, and so it is here.

Note that this is not in fact the only surviving piece of clothing worn by Elizabeth I; some of her underwear (a corset, I think?) was found on her funeral effigy.

OMG THE RAINBOW DRESS FABRIC SURVIVES EEEEEE!

Yuri on Ice interview translation - Pash! 2016/12 (p16-17)

This is an interview with Chacott’s Yuiko Sagiri that was published on Pash! Dec. 2016 issue. Chacott is a brand that mostly makes dance costumes/clothing/accessories, but they happen to create costumes for figure skating as well. She was in charge to come up with the designs for the original costumes appeared in the anime.

Usually I only post text, without images, and I was wondering what to do with this article, because it’s not as easy to understand without pictures. They have most of them on their blog too, but they’re all in different pages and it would have been a pain to link, therefore in the end I decided to include pictures taken from the magazine. Please understand that the pictures are only for reference and are not meant to be high quality scans (in fact I just took them with my phone and fixed them a little).

Since the post is heavier than usual because of the pictures I tried to use a cut for the first time. Maybe I should do it for long interviews as well…

***If you wish to share this translation please do it by reblogging or posting a link to it***
***Re-translating into other languages is ok but please mention that this post is the source***

Keep reading

Piercing Issues

Braun Strowman/Reader
Smut/Explicit, 3125 words

-

You’re backstage at Smackdown, holed up in your assigned corner, surrounded by fabric and costumes, busy at your sewing machine. You sigh to yourself, rubbing your eyes, because while there are plenty of creative aspects to your job, you also seem to spend an inordinate amount of time reinforcing the seams of tights.

“Hey,” says a gruff voice from behind you, and you turn, swivelling your chair around. There are some big guys here, and most of them have voices to match, but Braun’s is the biggest of all, every word he speaks amplified by the sheer bulk of him, echoing through that cavernous chest.

“Hey,” you say, smiling, because Braun’s also the guy who’s probably the least like his stage persona. He’s almost shockingly sweet, his offstage personality hard to reconcile with the monster he plays in the ring. “What can I do for you?”

Keep reading

6

The elusive “Wishing” fabric 

Originally said to be made exclusively for the 1986 musical “Phantom of the Opera”. Woven in India and hand dyed/printed in England, this silk fabric comes from a small husband-and-wife shop outside London. They collect antique fabrics and trims as well as reproducing elaborate materials, and they’re a favourite among film and stage designers. No wonder this specific stripy/floral rococo fabric has appeared in many movies and TV series, as well as on stage.

Keep reading