cosmographic

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sea monsters <3

Sea monster chart of German cartographer and cosmographer Sebastian Münster, who died today in 1552.

Detail from Olaus Magnus’s Carta Marina of 1539

Ulisse Aldrovandi, De Piscibus, 1613. Aldrovandi observed that stingrays (not pictured here), ‘love music, the dance and witty remarks’ but didn’t explain how they expressed their enthusiasm.

Pierre Pomet, Histoire Générale des Drogues, 1694. Sea unicorn (top) and narwhal (bottom), soon after this was published, the narwhal was identified as a ‘false unicorn’.

Abraham Ortelius, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1570

This is an illustration of the Mundus Cosmograph, a mechanism created at the Snow Tower Observatory located at the peak of the Throat of the world. The cosmograph was the first of it’s kind, and is currently used to track the celestial bodies. This information is most often used to predict the times of conjunction and power apex’s across Tamriel. 

Represented are the major constellations and their positions in relation to each other, the seasons of Nirn and Nirn itself. 

It is one of the many instruments used currently used in the researching of the Nexus Theorum. The correlation between the positions of the celestial bodies and their influence on the magical nature of Mundus itself. Some believe that it possible to predict the time and place that individuals designated as Nexus Vessels are conceived. Beings born to be involved in great events and mandate large sweeping changes to Tamriel. 

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General Atlas of All the Islands in the World

Islario general de todas las islas del mundo (General atlas of all the islands in the world) is the greatest work by Seville cosmographer Alonso de Santa Cruz (1505–67). The atlas was begun during the reign of Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain Charles V and finished in that of his son King Philip II, to whom it was dedicated. It consists of 111 maps representing all the islands and peninsulas of the world, and showing all the discoveries made by European explorers from 1400 to the mid-16th century. The atlas begins with a letter by Santa Cruz to the king, in which he justifies his work and explains different geographic concepts. Preceding the maps is “Breve introducción de la Sphera” in which Santa Cruz makes a cosmographic description, illustrated by 14 astronomical figures. The maps are organized in four parts: the first deals with the North Atlantic; the second, with the Mediterranean and adjacent areas; the third, with Africa and the Indian Ocean; and the fourth with the New World. The maps include scales in latitude and some in longitude and bodies of water with varied scales and oriented with compass roses. The Islario general is the earliest atlas in which paper is used, instead of the parchment that was previously most commonly used for such charts. The design of the maps is more functional, with less attention to aesthetics and more to geographic detail than in the late-medieval portolan maps and atlases. Scholars have determined, on the basis of the dates that appear in the descriptive texts on the islands, that the maps were made beginning in the fourth decade of the 16th century, around 1539, and that the entire atlas was completed circa 1560. It is highly probable that the Islario general was a part of a Geografía Universal that Santa Cruz never finished. Santa Cruz was one of the key figures of the Casa de Contratación (House of Trade) in Seville. One of his first works was a set of the spherical charts of the New World. He created various other works on cosmography and geography, such as the Libro de longitudes; and on historical themes, including  Crónica de los Reyes Católicos (Chronicle of the Catholic kings) and Crónica de Carlos V (Chronicle of Charles V). Following Santa Cruz’s death, his successor, Andrés García de Céspedes, attempted to claim credit for this work. On the cover the name Alonso de Santa Cruz has been erased, García de Céspedes’s name is inserted as if he were the author, and the work is dedicated to King Philip III. In the manuscript itself, apocryphal texts have been superimposed over the originals, with the aim of disguising the real authorship and date of creation.

raibeartbrighde  asked:

I have a question: In Gaelic spiritual lore the directions are considered sacred with poetic and spiritual symbolism such a the east is for prosperity and hospitality, the north is for war and strife. Is there anything similar for the Norse that you might be aware of?

So, as far as I know there isn’t anything that really parallels that, no. However, the directions do have cosmographic significance and therefore one could make something similar if they wanted to.

In the past, I’ve discussed how Norse cosmology has a comsography or divine geography. We know this in the sense of the nine realms. Well some of these realms have directional correspondences. For instance, Niflheim is associated with the North. Muspelheim lies to the south. Jotunheim lies to the east and to the north. And the west, well, to the west would be the British Isle which in the poem Þórsdrápa is strongly associated with jotnar as well. So at the center you have the inangard of Asgard and Midgard surrounded by the utgard of jotunlands.

 Since I vaguely know what you’re mentioning in your ask, if you’re wanting to set up a similar association, I’d personally recommend that the center be associated with various aspects of home and comfort and the gods perhaps whereas the other directions be associated strongly with various challenges and the like? Just a suggestions of course. 

Hope this helps!

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Between 1965 and 1988, the Rolex Cosmograph Daytona was available in a version with a black bezel in plexiglas, black subdials and screw-down chronograph pushers. It was the blueprint for today’s Daytona in 904L steel with a black Cerachrom bezel in ceramic.
#Rolex #CosmographDaytona #TBT

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This is an illustration of an Oblivion Cosmograph, one of many mechanisms created at the Snow Tower Observatory located at the peak of the Throat of the world. The cosmograph is one of the first true maps of the realms of Oblivion, and is currently used to track the movements of the Realms. This information is most often used to predict the times of conjunction and power apex’s across Tamriel.

Represented are the major oblivion realms and their positions in relation to each other, and to Mundus itself.

It is one of the many instruments used currently used in the researching of the Nexus Theorum. The correlation between the positions of the realms and their influence on the magical nature of Mundus itself. Some believe that it possible to predict the time and place that individuals designated as Nexus Vessels are conceived. Beings born to be involved in great events and mandate large sweeping changes to Tamriel.

It was this map along with other instruments that the Seridur Group developed to eventually pursue travel between the realms. Eventually culminating in the Aetherius Venture, which caused much controversy. Seridur proposed to exit Mundus and enter Aetherius itself. The specifics are kept a secret to this day, but it is known to be somewhat a success. Seridur returned twelve years later, having aged several centuries. He did not speak or move, but was alive.

Seridur still resides in a comatose state in the city of Alinor, though efforts to revive or communicate continue.

Jay Z and Beyoncé headed to Cleveland on Thursday to watch their good friend LeBron James and his Cleveland Cavaliers beat the Golden State Warriors 115-101 to tie the Finals series 3-3.

Hov was sporting a Rolex 2016 Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona with a black Cerachrom bezel. Cerachrom is a proprietary material that is corrosion and scratch-resistant, boasting a rich black color that won’t fade. The retail price stands at $13,000, and the piece is unreleased to the public as of yet. The New York Times reported last month that if you joined the waiting list for this timepiece today you would have a two to five year wait before being able to purchase it. Hov got the plug!

The Book Challenge

Two weeks ago muspeccoll tagged us in the book challenge, and what a challenge it was to just limit the list to only 10 books! In no order, here our some of our favorites. Images accompany all but two, since they have been used in past Facebook posts. We look forward to sharing more about these selections in the future, as well as sharing more of what we have!

Apologies if you have already been tagged, but we would love to hear from osurarebooks, udspeccoll, and georgetownspecialcollections.

1.) Ptolemy’s Geographiae Clavdii Ptolemaei Alexandrini…

Egyptian astronomer, mathematician, and geographer, Claudius Ptolemy (100-170 A.D.), was originally composed in Greek around 160 A.D., and contains the descriptions and locations of more than 8,000 places in the ancient world.

Special Collections has this 4th edition, published in 1552, by German cosmographer and scholar of Hebrew, Sebastian Münster (1489-1552), and printed by Heinrich Petri in Basle, which includes 27 fine double-page woodcut maps of the old world, and 27 of the new world.

2.) Euclid’s Elements of Geometrie, 1570

In about 300 B.C., Euclid wrote Elements, a mathematical and geometric treatise consisting of 13 books which is the world’s oldest continuously used mathematical text book.  At Special Collections you can find the first edition of the first complete English translation published in 1570 by English merchant, Henry Billingsley. A special feature of this edition, are the pasted flaps of paper that can be folded up to produce three dimensional models, making it one of the oldest pop-up books.

3.) 15th century Book of Hours

The origin of this stunning work is the School of Jacques de Besancon in Paris, circa 1489-1490.

4.) Andreas Cellarius’ Harmonia Macrocosmica [Atlas of the Heavens], published in 1708.

Amazing collection of celestial maps by Dutch-German mathematician and cosmographer Andreas Cellarius (c. 1596 – 1665). All maps, engraved and hand-colored, depict the planispheres according to Claudius Ptolemy, Nicolaus Copernicus and Tycho Brahe.

5.) Hugues de Fouilloy’s De Claustro Animae et de Nove Benefitiis Religionis

From the mid-1400’s, this is our oldest book! Handwritten with black ink on parchment made from calf skin (vellum) and covered with the original boards, most likely oak. 

6.) First edition of Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy, 1621

This just might be the most deluxe gilded binding that Special Collections owns!

7.) One of 120 complete sets of John James Audubon’s Birds of America

8.) Fragment from a 12th century missal

9.) Kelmscott Press, The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, 1896. Limited to 425 copies.

10.) First edition of The Matthew Byble, 1537.

Thanks for asking us to take part muspeccoll, it was fun!