corset-spine

lucycorsetry.com
Corset Back TOO Straight? Curving Steel Bones for a Healthy, Neutral Posture
Last week I wrote about what to do when your steels are too bendy or difficult to keep straight – so this week, we’ll discuss whether there’s anything you can do for steels that a…

Our spines are not designed to be perfectly straight - so why are so many corsets made with super stiff back steels that force your lumbar region ramrod straight?

My latest blog post will show you a NO-SEW method for curving the bones in the last panel of your corset to encourage a healthy, neutral posture and comfortably support your natural slight lumbar curve - and the benefits I experienced when I did this. Read more here.

Spine Corset by Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, S/S 1998, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø

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Corsets and Skeletal Deformities: an Anthropological Study:

In September 2015, The Canadian Student Journal of Anthropology (Nexus) included an anthropological study of women’s skeletons from England and France in the 1800s, when corsets were at their height in fashion. In this research study, PhD candidate Rebecca Gibson aimed to find any correlation between skeletal morphology (shape and relative position of the bones) and lifespan.

She documented how the ribcages and spines of corset wearers were modified from a lifetime of corset wear, and gives us a window of how they may have lived in order for their bones to have been shaped to the extent that they were.

Read more for my summary of the study, Rebecca Gibson’s answers to my questions concerning the study, thoughts from my chiropractor, and my thoughts on how this affects what we know about modern body modification through corsetry.

http://lucycorsetry.com/2015/10/05/corsets-skeletal-deformities-anthropological-study/

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Aristide

A collaboration with the lovely Emily Combs.

A sculpture based off of her incredibly imaginative and beautiful drawings. Check out her amazing work here—–> click me tho
That is an actual coyote head and spine. A corset of ribbon binds the skin on her back between each vertebrae, along with lace cuffs made by Emily. Both coyotes used in this sculpture were road kill.

This was accompanied in a gallery space by my drawings, Emily’s illustrations, and poetry by the amazingly talented writer, Sam McCormick .

I have made another post with some detail shots of this pretty doge’s visceral elegance in all its glory and gory detail. Check that post out here—–>prettypawsanddoggyclaws