cornell university

SAE FRATERNITY DEADLY HAZING OF HAITIAN-AMERICAN GEORGE DESDUNES RESURFACED AFTER RACIST CHANT VIDEO RELASED

If you were online this weekend, by now you’ve seen or heard of the nine-second racist video uploaded by an anonymous user on YouTube, which shows a group of party-bound Oklahoma Sigma Alpha Epsilon Frat members in formal attire clapping and chanting  while they sing racist lyrics to the tune of “If You’re Happy And You Know It.”

Sunday afternoon, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s national headquarters closed its chapter at the University of Oklahoma and suspended the members from the school. 

But this is not the first time this Fraternity has been in trouble or had one of their chapters close down. In 2011 a Cornell University Frat House was sued by Marie Lourdes Andre, for $25 Million over house hazing death of her 19-year-old Haitian-American sophomore son George Desdunes after members from the frat allegedly kidnapped, blindfolded, bound his hands and feet, and forced him to drink so much alcohol that he passed out and died.

Read more… (L'Union Suite)

#signalboost

World’s largest natural sound archive now fully digital and fully online.

“In terms of speed and the breadth of material now accessible to anyone in the world, this is really revolutionary,” says audio curator Greg Budney, describing a major milestone just achieved by the Macaulay Library archive at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. All archived analog recordings in the collection, going back to 1929, have now been digitized and can be heard at www.MacaulayLibrary.org

“This is one of the greatest research and conservation resources at the Cornell Lab,” said Budney. “And through its digitization we’ve swung the doors open on it in a way that wasn’t possible 10 or 20 years ago.”

It took archivists a dozen years to complete the monumental task. The collection contains nearly 150,000 digital audio recordings equaling more than 10 terabytes of data with a total run time of 7,513 hours. About 9,000 species are represented. There’s an emphasis on birds, but the collection also includes sounds of whales, elephants, frogs, primates and more.

“Our audio collection is the largest and the oldest in the world,” explained Macaulay Library director Mike Webster. “Now, it’s also the most accessible. We’re working to improve search functions and create tools people can use to collect recordings and upload them directly to the archive. Our goal is to make the Macaulay Library as useful as possible for the broadest audience possible.”

The recordings are used by researchers studying many questions, as well as by birders trying to fine-tune their sound ID skills. The recordings are also used in museum exhibits, movies and commercial products such as smartphone apps.

“Now that we’ve digitized the previously archived analog recordings, the archival team is focusing on new material from amateur and professional recordists from around the world to really, truly build the collection,” Budney said. “Plus, it’s just plain fun to listen to these sounds. Have you heard the sound of a walrus underwater?  It’s an amazing sound." 

Sample some fascinating Macaulay Library sounds:

Earliest recording: Cornell Lab founder Arthur Allen was a pioneer in sound recording. On a spring day in 1929 he recorded this Song Sparrow sounding much as they do today

Youngest bird: This clip from 1966 records the sounds of an Ostrich chick while it is still inside the egg – and the researchers as they watch

Liveliest wake-up call: A dawn chorus in tropical Queensland, Australia is bursting at the seams with warbles, squeals, whistles, booms and hoots

Best candidate to appear on a John Coltrane record: The indri, a lemur with a voice that is part moan, part jazz clarinet

Most spines tingled: The incomparable voice of a Common Loon on an Adirondacks lake in 1992

Most erratic construction project: the staccato hammering sounds of a walrus under water

Most likely to be mistaken for aliens arriving: Birds-of-paradise make some amazing sounds – here’s the UFO-sound of a Curl-crested Manucode in New Guinea

Hey guys! This is my friend Alexandria, she’s a scholarship student at Cornell University. She’s a National Merit Scholar, is so smart and very sweet, but right now, she and her mom having a hard time finding the funds to get her back up to New York from Texas. If any of y'all could even donate a little bit to getting her back to school, it would mean so much!
http://www.gofundme.com/bfreuo?forcedesktop=1

washingtonpost.com
Heroin addiction sent me to prison. White privilege got me out and to the Ivy League.

“I was a senior at Cornell University when I was arrested for heroin possession. As an addict — a condition that began during a deep depression — I was muddling my way through classes and doing many things I would come to regret, including selling drugs to pay for my own habit. I even began dating a man with big-time drug connections that put me around large amounts of heroin. When police arrested me in 2010, I was carrying six ounces, an amount they valued at $50,000 — enough to put me in prison for up to 10 years. Cornell suspended me indefinitely and banned me from campus. I had descended from a Dean’s List student to a felon.

But instead of a decade behind bars and a life grasping for the puny opportunities America affords some ex-convicts, I got a second chance. In a plea deal, I received a sentence of 2½ years. After leaving prison, I soon got a job as a reporter at a local newspaper. Then Cornell allowed me to start taking classes again, and I graduated last month. What made my quick rebound possible?

I am white.

Second chances don’t come easily to people of color in the United States. But when you are white, society offers routes to rebuild your life.”

Spot on.

U.S. Son of Mexican Immigrants Accepted Into All 8 Ivy League Schools

U.S. Son of Mexican Immigrants Accepted Into All 8 Ivy League Schools

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In this May 28, 2015 photo, Fernando Rojas, a senior at Fullerton High School, stands with his parents, Raul Rojas and Maria in Fullerton, Calif. (PHOTO CREDIT: Rose Palmisano/The Orange County Register via AP) It would have been a success story if Fullerton High School senior Fernando Rojas, the son of Mexican immigrants whose schooling stopped in the eighth grade, was accepted to college. But…

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