coretta scott king

The words were those of Coretta Scott King, widow of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

But they resulted in a rarely invoked Senate rule being used to formally silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

On the Senate floor Tuesday, Warren began reading from a letter Scott King wrote in 1986 objecting to President Reagan’s ultimately unsuccessful nomination of then-U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions to a federal district court seat.

Now-Sen. Sessions, R-Ala., is President Trump’s nominee for U.S. attorney general. Warren was speaking in the debate leading up to Sessions’ likely confirmation by the Senate Wednesday.

Republicans Vote To Silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren In Confirmation Debate

Photo: Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Whatever you do today definitely don’t fax a copy of Coretta Scott King’s letter to Mitch McConnell’s office at (202) 224-2499. It might jam the lines and that’d be a shame.
Don’t call his office at (202) 224-2541 and read the entire letter to whoever or whatever answers.
I’d also advise not mailing a TON of copies of the letter to his office until it looks like an assault from Hogwarts. The address you definitely wouldn’t send that to is:
Sen. Mitch McConnell
317 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510

A day after Senate Republicans invoked a conduct rule to end Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s speech against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions as U.S. attorney general, a 1986 letter from Coretta Scott King urging the Senate to reject Sessions’ nomination as a federal judge is gaining new prominence.

Warren was reading aloud from the letter by King, the widow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., when she was interrupted by the presiding chair of the Senate, who warned her of breaking Rule 19, which forbids members from imputing to a colleague “any conduct or motive unworthy or unbecoming a Senator.”

The warning mentioned Warren’s earlier quote of Sen. Edward Kennedy, who had called Sessions, then a U.S. attorney, a disgrace. But it was King’s letter that — more than 10 minutes after Warren finished reading it aloud Tuesday night — prompted Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to call her out of order. That resulted in Warren being silenced on the Senate floor.

In his objection, McConnell cited King’s accusation that Sessions had used “the awesome power of his office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black citizens.”

Read Coretta Scott King’s Letter That Got Sen. Elizabeth Warren Silenced

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images