coral reef

lana del rey in 2012: blue jeans, girls and nostalgia, angsty sad sad pretty when you cry, no one understands bc im a sad girl money power cocaine sad sad old money and racetracks nostalgia sad ultraviolence it’s a cRUEL WORLD

lana in 2017: WE NEED TO KNOW WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE WORLD AND SPREAD TRUTH & LOVE AND ACTIVISM. It’s a blessing 2 be young and in love and I’m so happy wE need to change the wORLD WE CAN DO IT!!!!! CORAL REEFS R DYING. down w/trump. Love.

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Blacktip Reef Shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus)

Photos taken by Connor Butler - Tioman Island, Malaysia. 

okay but seeing ransom discuss his experiences as the son of nigerian immigrants and how that’s affected him was so??? good??? i honestly don’t think i’ve ever seen that type of storyline explored in any media i’ve consumed. i’m glad that it was addressed, and i’m glad that we got to see some of that part of his character.

This open coral reef diorama in ¡Cuba! represents a string of jewel-like keys to the south of the main island of Cuba called the Gardens of the Queen (Jardines de la Reina). Here, silvery fish zip past banks of coral studded with colorful starfish, sea fans, and sponges. To protect this vital diversity, Cuba has created the largest marine reserve in the Caribbean. Coral reefs are some of the richest ecosystems on Earth, and on many Caribbean coastlines, they are in danger of disappearing. But in this protected area in Cuba, the reef is wonderfully alive. The diorama includes models of a hawksbill turtle, tiger shark, and spotted eagle ray. ©AMNH/M. Shanley

Here’s a feast for the eyes: An underwater view of National Park of American Samoa. Located some 2,600 miles southwest of Hawai'i, this is one of the most remote national parks in the United States. It includes sections of three islands – Tutuila, Ta'ū, and Ofu – and about 4,000 acres is underwater, offshore from all three islands. This photo was taken at the Ofu unit, which has a shallow protected reef with a great diversity of coral cover fish. Photo by National Park Service.

‘We are rewriting the textbooks’: first dives to Amazon coral reef stun scientists

There is a flickering, bright glimmer of sky as the two-person submarine descends beneath the muddy equatorial waters to a place no human has ever seen – a vast, complex coral reef at the mouth of the world’s greatest river.

Thirty metres under the murky plume of the sediment-heavy Amazon, the sub enters a darker, richer world. A school of curious remora fish approaches the two-tonne machine. Crabs and starfish loom in its eerie lights. A metre-long amberjack swims past, then a two-metre ray.

At a depth of 80 metres, the pilot pauses to record large mounds of coral covered in rainbow-coloured pygmy angelfish, wrasses and parrotfish. There are sponges 30ft long.                     

At 120 metres the sub settles on the nearly level ocean floor in a field of soft coral, sea whips and fans. The pilot manoeuvres its remote cameras to within inches of the reef wall. It consists mainly of sponges and colourful rhodolith beds – masses of coral-like red algae – which are formed by chemical synthesis and thrive in the low light.

Most of the world’s shallow reefs are in trouble due to bleaching, climate change and fishing, but this one is pristine. Its wall is full of minute grooves and cracks, each hole and fissure home to something alive. Small, brave crabs approach the sub and raise their claws as if to defend themselves against this alien monster.

There are four Brazilian oceanographers, ecologists and marine scientists taking turns to dive in the sub from the Greenpeace boat Esperanza. For them, the chance to observe the reef, which they and others discovered three years ago after dredging brought up corals, is as thrilling as winning the World Cup.

Last year, based on chemical analysis of the plume and measurements of oxygen levels, they estimated the reef to be about 600 miles long, to cover 3,600 square miles, and be about 30 to 120 metres deep. They thought it was biologically relatively impoverished compared to other equatorial reefs, but nevertheless they recorded more than 60 species of sponge, 73 species of fish, spiny lobsters, stars and other reef life.

The Amazon reef: ‘a mega biome, a major ecological community of plants and animals with its own endemic species’. Photograph: Greenpeace