copwatch

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I have been teaching myself basic typography. It is so exciting, srsly. I redesigned the Copwatch New Haven know your rights posters that I made a long time ago, because now that I know better I know they were fugly.

Full text of the posters is at the old link, although I changed it slightly since then. As before, feel free to use the posters in any way you need to. It’s mostly split from a (even fuglier) Crimethinc poster and edited from there. Contact me if you need better resolution pdfs.

“Kill them! Kill them!”

CopWatch In China: “Violent Government Thugs” Beaten To Death By Angry Crowds After They Killed A Man Documenting Their Brutality - Revolution News

At least 4 Chengguan, the most hated police-inspectors in China, were beaten to death by angry people in Cangnan County of Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province (located in the industrial southeast), after they killed a man with a hammer. The police-inspectors hit the man with a hammer until he started to vomit blood, because he was trying to take pictures of their violence towards a woman, a street vendor. The man was rushed to hospital, but died on the way.

Thousands of angry people took to the streets, surrounded the police-inspectors in their van, attacked them with stones, bats, and beat them to death. People were shouting that the police-inspectors be killed on the spot for what they did: “Kill them! Kill them!”

More pics & info onsite
H/t: @StreetLevelUprising, Lawrence Kansas

CopWatch is a good idea. Huey P. Newton had an even better idea: CopWatch with guns, to defend the community from racist killer cops. 

How many more Eric Garners have to die before we step up and organize for armed self-defense? How many Trayvons, Renisha McBrides, and refugee children at the border murdered by racist vigilantes?

You can say that the law prohibits carrying guns in many cities. Or that liberal gun-control ideology has permeated the working class and oppressed communities. But it is the job of revolutionaries to lead as well as to respond to the masses.

As the saying goes, first comes the struggle, then comes the law. And then, perhaps, if the people are armed with revolutionary ideas AND guns, comes the revolution.

Gaza and Donbass show the way.

Artist Seeking Silence 

This Friday, December 19th, a pro NYPD Rally is planned at City Hall. We are calling for a silent vigil at Thank you NYPD Rally in honor and memory of the lives lost to police brutality.

It is important that we remain silent during this action. They expect us to be “angry, loud and irrational.” We need to let them know that we feel something much deeper than just frustration. Let our silence be the loudest sound they hear.

Please wear all black and bring signs or posters with images of people who have lost their lives at the hands of police brutality and racial discrimination. 

For up-to-date information on the vigil, please follow this page

The New York Civil Liberties Union today unveiled the “Stop and Frisk Watch” app that allows New Yorkers to monitor police activity and report NYPD officers who conduct unlawful stop-and-frisk encounters and other police misconduct.

“Stop and Frisk Watch is about empowering individuals and community groups to confront abusive, discriminatory policing,” NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman said in a statement. “The NYPD’s own data shows that the overwhelming majority of people subjected to stop-and-frisk are black or Latino, and innocent of any wrongdoing. At a time when the Bloomberg administration vigorously defends the status quo, our app will allow people to go beyond the data to document how each unjustified stop further corrodes trust between communities and law enforcement.”

In February the NYPD released stop-and-frisk statistics to the City Council that revealed the highest number of stops ever recorded in one year. Out of 684,330 stop-and-frisk stops, 87% percent of those stopped in 2011 were black or Latino, and nine out of ten persons stopped were not arrested, nor did they receive summonses.

An NYCLU analysis showed that black and Latino males between the ages of 14 and 24 accounted for 41.6 percent of stops in 2011, though they make up only 4.7 percent of the city’s population. The number of stops of young black men exceeded the city’s entire population of young black men.

Read more…

reason.com
Watched Cops Are Polite Cops

This summer, after a civil suit challenged the New York City Police Department’s notorious program of patting down “suspicious” residents, Judge Shira A. Scheindlin of the Federal District Court in Manhattan imposed an experiment in which cops in precincts with the highest reported rates of stop-and-frisk activity would be required to wear video cameras for a year.

This is a really good idea.

Small cameras such as the AXON Flex from Taser International can attach to an officer’s sunglasses, hat, or uniform. Earlier this year, a 12-month study by Cambridge University researchers revealed that when the city of Rialto, California, required its cops to wear cameras, the number of complaints filed against officers fell by 88 percent and the use of force by officers dropped by almost 60 percent. Watched cops are polite cops.

In addition, research suggests that Judge Scheindlin has made the right call; requiring officers to wear video cameras will help protect citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure.

For example, a 2004 study in Criminology and Public Policy by criminologists Stephen Mastrofski from George Mason University and Jonathan Gould from American University evaluated direct observations of police searches in a medium-sized American city. They conservatively estimated that nearly one-third of police searches were performed unconstitutionally and almost none of those unconstitutional searches came to the attention of the courts.

Jay Stanley, a policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), calls police-worn video cameras “a win/win for both the public and the police.” Win/win because video recordings help shield officers from false accusations of abuse as well as protecting the public against police misconduct.

In order to make sure that both the public and police realize the greatest benefits from body-cams, however, a number of policies need to be implemented.

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