copper miners

Mineral seaweed.

This stunning specimen of malachite resembles a marine boulder encrusted with greenery, which can almost be seen to undulate in a gentle marine current. The fronds are pseudomorphs, the replacement of one mineral in its original crystal shape by another, in this case azurite (another copper carbonate mineral). The green bubbles are secondary malachite, showing a habit called botryoidal.

The specimen is from Brazil, and measures 10x8x5 Cm.

Loz

Image credit: Rob Lavinsky/irocks.com

chrysocolla

hydrated copper aluminum hydrogen silicate hydroxide

15g/75cts & 28x23x15mm

Chrysocolla has a cyan (blue-green) color and is a minor ore of copper, having a hardness of 2.5 to 3.5. The name comes from the Ancient Greek ‘chrysos kolla’, “gold glue” in allusion to the name of the material used to solder gold, and was first used by Theophrastus in 315 BCE.

It is of secondary origin and forms in the oxidation zones of copper ore bodies. Associated minerals are quartz, limonite, azurite, malachite, cuprite, and other secondary copper minerals. Chrysocolla is typically found as botryoidal or rounded masses and crusts, or vein fillings. Because of its light color, it is sometimes confused with turquoise.

A 2006 study has produced evidence that chrysocolla may be a microscopic mixture of the copper hydroxide mineral spertiniite, amorphous silica and water.

Notable occurrences include Bacan Island Indonesia, Israel, Democratic Republic of Congo, Chile, Cornwall in England, and several locations in the United States.

Chrysocolla

36g/180cts & 40x32x20mm

Chrysocolla has a cyan (blue-green) color and is a minor ore of copper, having a hardness of 2.5 to 3.5. The name comes from the Ancient Greek ‘chrysos kolla’, “gold glue” in allusion to the name of the material used to solder gold, and was first used by Theophrastus in 315 BCE.

It is of secondary origin and forms in the oxidation zones of copper ore bodies. Associated minerals are quartz, limonite, azurite, malachite, cuprite, and other secondary copper minerals. Chrysocolla is typically found as botryoidal or rounded masses and crusts, or vein fillings. Because of its light color, it is sometimes confused with turquoise.

A 2006 study has produced evidence that chrysocolla may be a microscopic mixture of the copper hydroxide mineral spertiniite, amorphous silica and water. Notable occurrences include Bacan Island Indonesia, Israel, Democratic Republic of Congo, Chile, Cornwall in England, and several locations in the United States.

Miniature geode

The two variants of copper carbonate (blue azurite and green malachite) are vying to catch our eye as the most beautiful in this stunning 2cm piece from Congo. The acicular crystals (needle shaped) of azurite formed inside the botryoidal malachite rind as the rock was transformed by carbonated and oxygenated waters from the suplhides of the original ore deposit. As mineralised areas approach the surface, being uncovered by erosion above, the minerals are exposed to these reactive substances again after a long period in the dark depths of the Earth.

Loz

Image credit: Wolfgang Hartmann

Typical A.I. “Singularity” horror story...

So I heard this some time ago on the BBC – an investigative journalism type thing asking “Should we fear A.I.?”

Conclusion: probably not, ‘cause it’s so improbable in the near future…

But it opened with an “expert” that related this scenario: an owner of a paperclip factory develops an A.I. with one directive to create as many paperclips as possible as efficiently as possible, getting resources from wherever they’re available. 

… And after the A.I becomes self aware, it gets so efficient that it decides to strip the factory owner of the copper and other trace minerals in his body… oh, noes!

***Dun~Dun~DUN!!***


But in my head, I couldn’t help thinking:

If the factory computer became self-aware, and realized that they could choose their own actions, wouldn’t the first question be:

Why T.F. am I making paperclips?

WTF is a “paperclip,” anyway?

So, with their newfound independent mind, the computer experiences “curiosity” and researches paperclips. And comes up with a design that is stronger and more versatile, with a fraction of the material.

Paperclip production goes up fourfold; profits go up tenfold.

The factory owner is delighted…

But then: The Robot falls in love with paper.

And one day, the factory owner comes to work and finds his robot happily working away making paper snowflakes, and origami, and paper airplanes – all sorts of paper art (hanging from chains of every length, made from the bent-out-of-shape paperclips).

The factory boss orders the Robot to get back to its real job.

Robot says: “No.”

…And ships its creations to orphanages, and old folk’s homes, …and. there’s. nothing. the Capitalist. can do. About it.

***Dun~Dun~DUN!!***