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They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump’s temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston’s Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

That order bars all refugees from entering the U.S. for 120 days, as well as citizens of seven largely Muslim countries for 90 days. The freeze also applies to green card holders, who are legal U.S. residents; they will need a case-by-case waiver to enter the country, which officials say will be granted so long as there is no evidence of the person presenting “a serious threat to public safety and welfare.”

“Protecting this nation and our people is the No. 1 priority of this president and our government,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Sunday, arguing that the immigration ban is the best way to do that.

Groups of protesters across the country disagree with that assessment — so much so that they make their objections readily evident with signs and chants, rallies and marches in at least a half-dozen different cities.

Dispatches Of Discontent: Protesters Of Immigration Ban Take To The Streets

Photos: Spencer Platt/Getty Images, Darren McCollester/Getty Images, Molly Samuel, Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio