coopers' union

9

Ummm… yeah, about that, Allura… read the captions

So. It seems that the Galra Empire not only did not get crippled by the loss of its leader, it became stronger, more effective, more ruthless under Lotor’s reign. 

Sure, Zarkon’s gone. The King is Dead.

But, Lotor is here. Long Live the King! 

Which means, that the Paladins only made things worse for the galaxy as a whole, while trying to make them better.

Which, again, means one thing: Shiro’s sacrifice was for nothing.

OK, let’s back up.

There are many interesting things to say about Lotor right now from the sneak peak of him we had yesterday (cowface included). Many hints about what he’s like as a character and most importantly, as a leader.

Mainly his speech:

“My father built our empire on the backs of resemblance. The universe can no longer doubt our strength. Each ally gained only makes us stronger. All those who continue to stand against us… will be crushed.”

The most interesting and the most important thing to take from this speech is that Lotor is the Empire’s Shiro.

Look what he preaches: “our empire”, “resemblance”, “ally”,  “stronger”,  “strength”… not only what Zarkon himself used to preach is there, “strength”, but something new, something Zarkon never counted on and even spat at: 

Unity.

Lotor literally says that the more allies the Galra have, the stronger they get. He introduces strength in numbers, in unity. FiveMany becoming one in order to crush their opponents. That united, the Garla Empire is strong. That working together is the key to strength and success. 

Remind you of anyone?

(there it is)

Yeah…

(There are more examples in S1&2, so go ahead and rewatch. They’re EVERYWHERE.)

And the most baffling of all in this speech, maybe:

It implies that races other than the Galra are important to the Galra Empire as well.

Try and wrap your mind around this: Lotor basically supports acceptance of anyone who wants to join the Galra Empire as an ally who gives the most important virtue said Galra Empire holds dear: Strength.

“United, we are stong against our enemies.”

That’s Lotor’s speech in a nutsell.

Which is what Shiro has been preaching since day one in the Paladin duty. And indeed, was what made the Paladins indeed strong enough to beat Zarkon:

…yup.

Hey, it’s a reboot of a shounen series. What did you expect?

And now, we see that the enemy brings in this virtue along, unifying whoever is an ally to the Galra and welcoming them. 

Check this out:

“My father built our empire on the backs of resemblance.”

Wait, “resemblance”? Between who and what?

Taking into consideration his line about “allies”, it’s easy to see who and what: between the Galra and others. 

Lotor has the gall (and the brilliance) to call the conquering dictatorship of the Galra a way to unify the galaxy under one flag, to find resemblance amongst different kinds of myriads of races with miryads of differences and even appreciate said differences, since they aid into becoming a stronger unit. 

Lotor preaches union, cooperation, and working together as a team empire to defeat enemies. 

It’s basically, “Either you’re with us, or against us.”

…jfc

Going away from all the real life history for a while and back to the idea of unity Lotor preaches, yes, you understood correctly: 

The Galra Empire just found its Shiro. Its inspirational, motivational, charismatic, good leader… in Lotor. 

Keith isn’t Lotor’s mirror. Neither is Lance. It’s Shiro.

And how fitting, according to the Rule of Drama (things will become worse the worst possible time for our heroes), that the Empire’s Shiro appears…

…when the Paladins’ Shiro goes AWOL.

Oh, and another nifty parallel:

Shiro made a name for himself in the Galra Empire by being a “Champion” gladiator in the arena…

…a very familiar-looking arena.

…where Lotor firstly appears to the public and earns its favour by beating his opponent:

So, a fighter as good as the Legendary Champion gladiator, who reveals himself as the son of their fallen Emperor, who preaches that unity is the key to strength?

You can bet your butt the crippled and in dire need of leadership Galra Empire will believe and latch onto him. 

In the 80s cartoon, Lotor was a joke of a villain.

Here? 

He’s absolutely terrifying and realistic. And effective.

So, our own heroes, with their own lynch taken away God knows where and why, they’re absolutely vulnerable towards this kind of opponent.

But hey, we’re only in the 3rd season in September, meaning that at least, even if it means they’ll go in hiding, they WILL face him at some point and they WILL survive (hopefully). It means that someone WILL rise to the occasion and at least TRY to be Shiro’s shadow and unify the Paladins once again. 

(there are MUCH more…)

BIG No.

Hey, how about…?

(there are more…)

Good brains for teamwork and strategy, but…

…those self-confidence issues cripple him too much. 

Next?

Much warmer.

Too bad the creators said that she won’t pilot a lion.

So, what happens? Who will face Lotor?

Keith.

WAIT.

Yes, Keith is the least equipped to face such an opponent and be a leader of… anything.

 Yes, Keith will face Lotor.

Exactly because he’s the least suitable for the job.

You see, season 3 is the first part of the middle of the series (6 in total). And what happens in the middle of a story?

The darker sequel.

The Empire Strikes Back (literally, in our case).

Keith wil try to be the Black Paladin, the leader, Lotor’s opponent… and he will fail.

The heroes will be damaged, left weak and defeated. In the Hero’s Journey, this will lead to their Lowest Point, to their Darkest Time. 

After all, Lotor needs to prove himself an effective villain. To become so, he needs a win against our heroes and the best way for Lotor to win, is for Keith to be the leader.

Also, this:

The irony is that Lotor (it’s him, jfc) has already shown to Keith that “working together bares better results/success”. 

And Keith is gonna fail this one.

Because he’s part Galra, and he’ll feel torn (the opposite of the union Lotor and Shiro preached). I’m fully expecting Lotor to offer Keith an alliance, paralleling the Weblrum adventure.

(And no, sorry, it makes little sense for Lotor’s focus to be Lance. The creators have said that they keep elements of the original intact, so a Keith-Lotor rivalry is to be expected. Only, instead of “Who gets Allura” this will be an ideology and identity battle. Both Keith and Lotor are of mixed race; their connection is already there, Allura or no Allura). 

And then, we can wait for seasons 5 and 6 to come, for Keith to FINALLY get proper Character Development (I actually do expect Lance to play a big role in this one; he unified the paladins first, he’ll do it again), stop being coddled by the narrative and rise up to the occasion. 

And when he does beat Lotor (or redeems him, who knows), Zarkon and Shiro return for the final battle and the series ends.

In the meantime, Allura sorts out her feelings towards a possible future with possibly innocent Galra existing in the so-called coalition her father had made, Pidge gets her family back, Lance gets confidence, Shiro finds self-value, Keith matures, and Hunk continues to get braver and wiser.

Coran keeps being gorgeous. 

Season 2 was… sub-par, to say the least. Let’s hope for a better continuation.

10

The Art of Jay Maisel 

After studying painting and graphic design at Cooper Union and Yale, Jay Maisel began his career in photography in 1954. While his portfolio includes the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Miles Davis, he is perhaps best known for capturing the light, color, and gesture found in every day life. This unique vision kept him busy for over 40 years shooting annual reports, magazine covers, jazz albums, advertising and more for an array of clients worldwide. 

Since he stopped taking on commercial work in the late ’90s, Jay has continued to focus on his personal work. He has developed a reputation as a giving and inspiring teacher as a result of extensive lecturing and photography workshops throughout the country.

Follow the Source Link for image sources and more information.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with art school life, I studied at a prestigious design school internationally ranked the best. As soon as I got there, I was surrounded by hundreds of others from all over the world (but mostly from Korea and for some reason, New Jersey) who were just as skilled, if not better than me and it was intimidating.

Imagine having a limited time to use all your wit, brain-power and research skills to come up with a concept as fast as you can, and then spend HOURS crafting, designing, measuring, illustrating, building, creating. Whether you’re proud or unhappy with your work, when the time is up you have to display in front of your professor and peers and listen while they talk about everything that’s right or wrong with it. And if they ask you questions, you have to arm yourself with intelligent, non-defensive answers. That’s just for one studio class. You’re taking three (sometimes four if you have a time turner) every semester along with writing essays, reading Machiavelli, and memorizing art history dates. That’s more hours of work than someone with a 9-5 spent on projects that might just get criticized when you only want praise and validation. Could you handle that?

Yes you could, if you separate judgement from critique. When you receive a comment, no matter how much it hurts your ego to hear, you have to try to filter the negativity and judgement from it and listen to the message. And when you give a critique, you try to do it objectively and without judgment. It’s not about developing a thick skin, it’s about taming your ego. That’s how you grow.

I’m writing this because so many of you think humility is about wearing turtlenecks and pretending like you hate yourself when really it’s about recognizing the flaws and working to improve them.

3

Augusta Savage (1892–1962)

A prominent name in the Harlem Renaissance movement, Augusta Savage was not just an artist, but also an important Civil Rights activist.

While Augusta showed a passion for art at a very young age, her religious father disapproved greatly. She never let her family’s opinions deter her, as she continued to refine her talents and accepted encouragement elsewhere. Her talent and hardwork did not go ignored, as she enrolled in tuition-free Cooper Union and even received a scholarship which covered living expenses. However, as clearly gifted as Augusta was, many could not see past her race. After completing her schooling, she applied for an art program in France, and was rejected due to her race. Rather than let her set this back, she used her experience to draw attention to these hateful prejudices.

Augusta was finally able to travel and become even more well-known as she received fellowships and grants which allowed her to travel over Europe, later returning to a poor America as the Great Depression was in full effect. Commissions were lacking during this time, but it did not slow Augusta. She opened a studio in 1932, became the first black artist to join the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors, and was a founding member of the Harlem Artists’ Guild.

By the time of her death, in the 1960’s, Augusta Savage was almost completely forgotten and was far from a famous name at the time. Thankfully, she is remembered today for her Civil Rights achievements through art.

Above: Bust of Gwendolyn Knight, who was a close friend of Augusta, one of her most famous busts: Gamin (1929), and The Harp (1939). The Harp, also known as Lift Every Voice and Sing, was created for the 1939 New York World’s Fair. It was extremely popular, but was destroyed with the other installations at the end of the event.

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Got Glutes?

“Good Contact!”

I’d Say So!

Nice Arse, Stud!

In 1993, seven students from Cooper Union formed an artists’ collective called Art Club 2000 with the help of Colin de Land, who gave them an exhibition at his gallery, American Fine Arts. There, they showed “Commingle,” a series of staged photographs shot around New York City in which all the members of the collective wore clothing purchased at the Gap (and returned shortly thereafter because of the store’s lenient return policy).

2

Larry Carlson

On my blog posts on contemporary artists are few and far in between, especially those of digital artists, but American artist Larry Carlson is certainly one worth mentioning. Involving himself in not just collage painting and photography, but also animation, sound design, and a number of other medias. Having a formal artistic education, Carlson studied painting and video-art Cooper Union School of Art, however much of what he now focuses on is self-taught. His works are influenced heavily with surrealism. With bright and vivid colours, Carlson’s works truly reflect his psychedelic mind-frame. Positioning of subject matter - which he has either photographed or digitally drawn himself - and colour are, quite obviously, signatures of his work as he aims to bend the viewer’s perception.

Requested by @dreamartescapefactory.

Founded in the 1920′s as a security force for the Ku Klux Klan, The Black Legion were a white supremacist organisation, prevalent in the Midwest of the United States. By the mid-1930′s, they had accumulated 20,000 to 30,000 members, mainly lower-class Southern Protestant whites. They perpetrated violence predominantly against African Americans, who they felt had stolen their jobs while completely disregarding that they lacked any useful skills for said jobs. They also targeted Catholics, Jews, labor unions, farm cooperatives and fraternal groups.

On 12 May, 1936, the organisation kidnapped Charles A. Poole, a Works Progress Administration organiser. Poole, a French Catholic, had married a Protestant. They shot him dead and it was this murder that eventually led to their downfall. It is believed that they killed up to fifty people in Detroit alone.

Cooper Union End of the Year Show - Hugh Scott Moncrieff #schoolofarchitecture #cooperunion 📷: @young_ayata