cooking-show

TV Show Idea

It’s your usual Cutthroat Kitchen tournament-style episodic cook-off…with a catch: the contestants - pretentious, self-important chefs from around the country - are judged not by top-of-the-line famous cooks, but by normal people. 

And not just normal people, but normal people with everyday limitations that the chefs must adhere to. Each episode is a new competition that challenges the chefs with a new limitation or change based on various people’s food realities. 

Here are some possible episodes: 

  • Create a dessert (pastry/cake in one episode, ice cream-type dessert in another) for Diabetic people 
  • Make a traditionally spicy dish for people with Sensory Processing Disorder 
  • Cook for a kids’ birthday party, bearing in mind that children have very simple tastes and will be put off by “gourmet” ingredients 
  • Again with SPD, make a meal that normally has too many mixed textures for the judges to comfortably eat 
  • Catering for elderly judges who both cannot chew/crunch very well (and are sick of soup/oatmeal) 
  • Catering for elderly judges with a combo of “can’t taste unless the flavors are very strong” and “aging body can’t handle too many spices” 
  • “We surveyed 100 low-income families to see what their most common ingredients/spices/brands are and you may ONLY use those. Now make Thanksgiving dinner.” 
  • Traditionally cheese- or milk-heavy recipes for people who are lactose intolerant 
  • “We surveyed 100 college students and– look, just make really good ramen out of these $0.99 noodles from CVS and some cheap spices.” 
  • Various religious restrictions 

Each of these will be judged by people who are really in the given situation. The low-income competition is judged by people who have those budget limitations every Thanksgiving. Their judges for the SPD episode are all Autistic (or have other SPD-inclusive disorders). The kids probably aren’t actually having a birthday party but they ARE all actually young children giving their honest opinion of what the contestants cook. 

Most chefs, when faced with making, say, a non-spicy hollandaise sauce will panic and say “the dish is ruined!” because all they did was make the sauce minus cayenne. Those chefs would soon be eliminated, leaving only adaptable, accepting contestants who know how to work inside the box to improve a given dish. Add, not just take away. Chefs who are ready to take classic meals in a new direction are the ones who win. 

The ultimate moral of this show is that given dishes can be made many ways, not just the traditional ways. 

Audiences in the mentioned demographics will both love seeing themselves represented on TV and learn new recipes invented under pressure/on the fly that they can copy at home. 

Feel free to add episode ideas to this!! I’m sure I missed a lot of people. 

youtube

I stumbled upon this charming cooking video today (178K+ views! Wow!). More than any other cuisine in the Avatar universe, the Southern Water Tribe seaweed noodles are something I always feel a desire to eat in real life when I see those scenes, probably summoned by memories of tasty noodle dishes I have eaten in my travels to South Korea. So it was a real treat to discover that this cute mother/son team from the online cooking show Feast of Fiction had the same idea and made it a reality. As for me, make mine vegan, but yes, a fish- and sea vegetable-based dish is appropriately “Water Tribe.”

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Cooking is an art, so I think this counts as fanart!

vine

THIS IS WHY I LOVE WATCHING SEUNGRI’S COOKING SHOWS

he is a little  hoe

Cutthroat Kitchen drinking game

Take a drink every time:

  • a contestant admits to not knowing what a dish is or how to make it
  • a contestant forgets a main ingredient in the pantry
  • the auction jumps more than $1,000 between bids
  • Alton Brown laughs maniacally (or does something else particularly malicious)
  • a sabotage ends up working to a contestant’s advantage
  • or, a contestant talks about not caring about a sabotage, and then they get it
  • someone buys a sabotage and later on it ends up biting them in the ass (eg they swap stations with the person who got the sabotage)
  • a contestant gets excited and cocky about having to make a dish that comes from their heritage (eg a Mexican chef gets to make huevos rancheros)
    • and then when they inevitably lose the round (seriously like 90% of the time they go home on their own heritage’s dish!)
  • “deconstructed”
  • or the contestant refers to their dish with a descriptive word that it’s clearly not

Finish your drink (but then pour yourself another) whenever:

  • contestant demographics: three men, one woman
  • a contestant spends more than half their money in the first round
  • bidding passes $10,000
  • you don’t like the person who wins the episode
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Have you seen my one-minute cooking show Minute Kitchen? Each short video teaches you how  to make an easy, healthy, (gluten free and often vegan) recipe in 1 minute or less! Check out all 8 episodes here and stop back every  Wednesday for the new recipe!

Edit edit edit: I’m sorry, the link wasn’t working but it’s fixed now!! :)

im watchimg a cooking show and this lady,,, she just showed herself in a graveyard and said “this is my family graveyard. it’s usually where i turn and head back to the house. now, for the next recipe, i’m going to make cauliflower” and sHE NEVER MENTIONED ANYTHING ABT THE GRAVEYARD I EXPECTED A RECIPE FROM HER ANCESTORS OR SOMETHING BUT NO SHE JUST WAS LIKE “HERES MY PERSONAL GRAVEYARD LET’S COOK” BYE

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Honey, I shrunk the queso.

They’ve fried hard shell tacos, made a comforting bowl of chicken noodle soup, even whipped up a batch of rainbow sprinkle-covered donuts. In an age of molecular gastronomy, this may not seem like culinary genius. But on Tiny Kitchen, everything is cooked in a dollhouse kitchen roughly 1/12 the normal size.

Now in its second season, the popular online video series is produced by media group Tastemade. Jay Holzer, head of production, says that the idea for a tiny cooking show came from one of Tastemade’s Japanese partners, who sent them a box filled with a tiny stove, tiny utensils, and a set of tiny cutting boards.

“Since then, it’s taken on a life of its own,” Holzer says.

Miniatures have long been popular in Japan due to the cultural dominance of kawaii, or all things cute, but making minuscule edible food — rather than polymer clay copies — is the newest incarnation of that trend. (A quick search of YouTube reveals several similar tiny cooking shows that appear to be from Japan.)

‘Tiny Kitchen’ Videos Cook Up Real Food In Doll-Sized Portions

Photos: Courtesy of Tiny Kitchen