contributing property

There’s nothing about markets that require private ownership over the means of production. See mutualism, market socialism, and market anarchism for anti-capitalist market systems.

There’s nothing about “keeping the fruits of your labor” that requires private ownership over the means of production. In fact, workers who are employed under a boss never get to take home the full product of their labor, since the grand majority of it belongs to the boss based on private ownership claims over everything the worker produces. Hell, socialists very often argue “to each according to their contribution”, allotting individuals greater reward the greater their labor contribution to the collective pool, as long as a livable floor is established for all and no one hierarchically owns and manages the workplace.

There’s nothing about “small government” that requires private ownership over the means of production. Worker cooperatives are completely viable. Furthermore, there’s the fundamental idea that collective operations ought to be deliberated on democratically, rather than through an autocratic capitalist or state. Private control over the means of production is not a natural conclusion of “limited government”; if anything, for all intents and purposes, they’re actually opposed to each other.

There’s nothing about organization and management that requires private ownership over the means of production. Workers are perfectly capable of voting on accountable managers and building consensus on organizational aspects of the institution. In theory, we vote on politicians to “help manage” the country, but we in turn don’t expect them to wield power tyrannically or claim sovereignty over the country like a king; the same principle applies to democratic workplaces, in the sense that you can totally separate elected/accountable/immediately recallable management from the hierarchical ownership of the place.

If the idea is that we need to eradicate concentrations of power, then socialism is the way to. If the idea is that we need to maintain individual liberty to the extent that “fists can be swung until they hit another nose”, then socialism is the way to go. If the idea is that we need to build a system where we recognize hard work and labor as the necessary base, then socialism is the way to go.

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Campbell Symington House, 3977 Second Avenue–Detroit MI by pinehurst19475
Via Flickr:
This house was designed by the noted Detroit church architects Donaldson & Meier in 1882 for Campbell Symington, who two years later became a business partner of J. L. Hudson. Mister Symington was born in Scotland in 1848 and came to Detroit at the age of twenty. After working as office manager for Mabley’s Department Store, where he met Mister Hudson, the two purchased a carpet business, which was eventually housed in the Hudson store on Woodward Avenue. Mr. Symington lived in the home until his death in 1928. The house is representative of the upper-middle class homes on Second Avenue (when built it cost $12,000–a considerable sum in that era) and adjoining streets in the late 19th and early 20th century. Symington House has Romanesque accents and is faced in red-vein sandstone. The home is a contributing property to National Register and City of Detroit historic districts. And judging from the exterior, the structure is in admirable shape.

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Judge Philip Van Zile House, 650 West Forest Street–Detroit MI by pinehurst19475
Via Flickr:
This substantial Queen Anne house in the Warren-Prentis Historic District was built in 1891 for Judge Philip Van Zile. The architect was the prolific Almon Clother Varney, who designed apartments and single-family homes in the Cass Corridor/Midtown area. In addition to this structure, Van Zile also owned two small apartment buildings on West Forest. The Van Zile School on East Outer Drive was named after Judge Van Zile. The building is a contributing property to the National Register and City of Detroit, Warren-Prentis Historic District.

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Thomas G. Craig House: 461 West Alexandrine Street–Detroit MI by pinehurst19475
Via Flickr:
This Queen Anne-style house was built in 1883 for Thomas G. Craig, a grain merchant. It is a contributing property to a local and national historic district.