contemporary installation art

10

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam

Japanese artist Toshiko Horiuchi-MacAdam is considered one of Japan’s leading fiber artists, using knitting and crochet as the foundation for much of her work. 

Her website explains that she specializes in “creating large, interactive textile environments that function both as imaginative and vibrant explorations of color and form, at the same time as providing thrilling play environments.”

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6

Tree Drawings, Tim Knowles

A closer look at British artist Tim Knowles’ series of drawings produced using drawing tools attached to the tips of tree branches; the wind’s effects on the tree, recorded on paper. Like signatures each drawing reveals the different qualities and characteristics of each tree.

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5

Floral Minds by Minas Halaj

Incorporating elements of classical education with contemporary influences, Minas Halaj’s art manifests itself by way of a symphony of graphics, sculptures, collages and figurative compositions. 

Halaj uses a variety of recycled material including tar as part of the background and pieces of a pre-Victorian dresses to add texture and dimension making his work deeply complex. Peep more of Halaj’s work at http://minashalajart.com/ (via Juxtapoz)

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10

Abstract Water Art, Kim Keever

Kim Keever’s large-scale photographs are created by meticulously constructing miniature topographies in a 200-gallon tank, which is then filled with water.

These dioramas of fictitious environments are brought to life with colored lights and the dispersal of pigment, producing ephemeral atmospheres that he must quickly capture with his large-format camera.

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4

Measuring the Universe, Roman Ondak

Starting as an empty white room, Roman Ondak’s Measuring the Universe at Tate St Ives has grown through the contribution of around 90,000 participants to a constellation of black marks. 

Through the simple action of measuring oneself, Ondak’s work doesn’t just expand on ideas of space and the universal but also the personal, creating a growing living artwork that questions just what a museum is for.

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