constituency

Dear Trump Administration

Hello Mr Ryan, Mr Trump, and whomever else this may concern.

(And, if you are an American of any stripe, then as it turns out it also concerns you.)

I am a family physician. I interact with your constituents all day, every day. I hear about their problems, their struggles, and often the limitations they face regarding healthcare. I try to help them when I can. That’s my job in a nutshell.

So let me tell you about one of your constituents who also happened to become my patient. Let’s call him Bob.

Bob is a middle aged man who worked full time at an entry level manual labor type job. The kind of job you spend 40 hrs/wk working but still hover around the poverty line. The kind of job with no benefits. He didn’t go to the doctor and had no health insurance but as far as he knew he also didn’t have any health problems. Until one day he started feeling unwell. This persisted for a few days and he refused to let his wife take him to the doctor. He was worried about the cost and figured he’d get better in a few days anyway. Only he didn’t. He got worse and his wife called an ambulance.

Enter the healthcare system.

Actually, let’s skip ahead to the final diagnosis. Bob has type 2 diabetes. Newly diagnosed. Easy. Boring. Right? Except Bob clearly had diabetes for some time, unbeknownst to him. When he arrived in the Emergency Department he was in septic shock. He was riddled with large abscesses in his internal organs and soft tissues. Both his lower limbs were necrotic. He had osteomyelitis in multiple locations. What’s really amazing though is that he lived. He had both his legs amputated below the knees and was hospitalized for weeks. All told he had 8 or 9 surgeries. He required weeks of additional IV antibiotics. But he ultimately got better. And his diabetes is well controlled now on pretty minimal medication.

During his hospital stay he was enrolled in Medicaid which, fortunately, will pay for all this medical expense. So let’s look at this from an economic perspective for a quick minute. This is a man who very quickly racked up hundreds of thousands of dollars of medical bills for which the government will pay. He is wheelchair bound now and on disability, again on the government’s tab. He will certainly have additional complications during his lifetime including pressure ulcers, infections, chronic kidney disease, etc. All told this one individual is costing/will cost the government millions of taxpayer dollars.

For want of a couple hundred bucks of prevention.

A routine visit to any PCP would have certainly identified his diabetes earlier and, as it turns out, he only needs like $30/month of medication to control it.

This is the tragedy of healthcare in America. That few hundred bucks of prevention is the ‘entitlement’ you and your fellow Republicans want to remove. This is of course saying nothing of the great personal cost to Bob in terms of his quality of life, physical, and psychological well being. Your bill that was withdrawn on Friday was nothing short of an abomination. Now, you might say I have chosen an extreme example to make a political point. Only I haven’t. I have multiple Bob like patients. Ask any PCP, especially in rural and urban underserved America. I promise you they will all know Bob. They will all have multiple Bobs on their panel.

Obamacare is not perfect, but it is progress. You must understand that prevention is cheap and to continue to make progress Obamacare must be augmented and refined, not ‘repealed and replaced’. Anything else is a complete affront to the American people. So please, cut your political BS and draft some useful legislation with input from actual physicians and other folks who understand that yes, healthcare is complicated. Perhaps you could ask Mr. Obama for some tips.

Memento mori,

Hostile Shrubbery

6

For her, governments of any stripe would have their constituents believe that they were attempting to remove chaos from the galaxy, that they were trying to make things perfect, when only the Force was perfect. For ordinary beings, life was a constant interplay between order and chaos, day and night, light and dark.
Her reverence for the Force had evolved from an enduring love of nature. Yes, she thought of herself as agile and strong and intuitive, but she understood that her skills were a far cry from those attributed to the Jedi. She did, however, embrace the Order’s philosophy of generosity, compassion, and peaceful resolution, and on many a far-flung world she had experienced moments in nature that could only be described as transcendent. It was certainly possible that those peak moments had their basis in belief and emotion, but that hardly mattered; even if she wasn’t able to use the Force, she could at least feel it, and she was content with that.

anonymous asked:

who are the boys' denizens? bc like.... some of the monster factory creations could work p well? final pam especially. o now that i think abt it the boy mayor and knife dad could be the rulers of prospit and derse, bc they each have a ton of followers (the mayor has his constituents and knife dad has his kids)

fuck your CHESS PIECES ive got a KNIFE DAD

Gentlemen, I am a Catholic. As far as possible, I go to Mass every day. This [taking a rosary out of his pocket] is a rosary. As far as possible, I kneel down and tell these beads every day. If you reject me on account of my religion, I shall thank God that He has spared me the indignity of being your representative.
—  Hilaire Belloc (Belloc’s speech to his constituency on running for Parliament, which seat he won)
Thanks, Obama

Originally posted by imstilljulie

When President Obama was inaugurated (the first time), Twitter wasn’t quite three years old. Facebook had only been open to the general public for two and a half years, and Tumblr had just celebrated its second birthday.

In a self-described effort to become “the most open and accessible administration in history,” the @whitehouse started to use these platforms to talk directly to their constituents. And Tumblr got to be a big part of that. Over the last eight years, the Obama administration launched more than 20 different Tumblrs for different departments, agencies, and outreach programs. Here are some heavy hitters:

Official Government Tumblrs

The White House (@whitehouse)

Originally posted by whitehouse

Most notably, The White House’s official Tumblr, which launched on April 25, 2013. For almost 4 years, it has been their informational hub for current political events and activations. In keeping with the Tumblr tone, their very first post promised that “yes, of course there will be GIFs.” And yes, there were. We could not have been more excited or proud.

NASA (@nasa)

Originally posted by nasa

NASA launched nearly two years later. They’ve spent 59 years exploring the universe and dropped the most amazing information and visuals right to your dashboard. They also knew how to use GIFs. It’s not rocket science.

The U.S. Department of State (@statedept)

Originally posted by statedept

The DOS was actually one of the first official government Tumblrs, quietly launching in April of 2011. With a more serious tone, they kept their followers up to date with the world of foreign policy. And yes, they even had GIFs for that. We cannot stress just how good this administration was with GIFs, Tumblr. Much better than Taft’s.

Letters to President Obama (@letterstopresidentobama)

Originally posted by letterstopresidentobama

Typed and handwritten letters to POTUS scanned, uploaded, and answered by the President himself. There are thank yous to and from President Obama, there are people disclosing their fear for the future and hope for their community, there are tears in your eyes within the first five minutes of visiting this Tumblr.

The Department of Interior (@americasgreatoutdoors)

Originally posted by americasgreatoutdoors

Maybe not the most well-known department, but the DOI has the most beautiful photos of any official government blog on Tumblr. This will remain true unless Joe Biden releases a Tumblr full of selfies within the next three days.

There was also the US Fish and Wildlife Service-Pacific Region (@usfwspacific), the National Archives (@usnatarchives) , the IRS (@internalrevenueservice), the Peace Corps (@peacecorps), and so, so much more.


Top Posts from the Community

This scientific trinity received over half a million notes. Say hello to these buddies:

Originally posted by u-gotta-kik

And these uh, unverified photos of President Obama making the new $100 bill in MS Paint garnered over 650k likes, reblogs, and replies.

Originally posted by antiocial

You want to click through to see the rest. 

This one is particularly timely. With over 300,000 notes, user @cognitivedissonance thanked Obama for ACA. Without it, they would not have been able to receive treatment for bronchitis.

Originally posted by cognitivedissonance

Mic (@micdotcom) posted a GIF set of a girl who sort of represented all of our feelings about President Obama not being able to run for a third term. 

Originally posted by micdotcom

Neither are we, kiddo.

One more time, while we still can: Thanks, Obama.

10

Betsy DeVos has been confirmed by one vote as the Secretary of Education. Two Republican Senators voted against their party to protest DeVos

Today, the Senate narrowly confirmed Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education, with VP Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie. The Democrats fought hard against the wealthy GOP donor, staying up all night to read letters from constituents in an effort to eke out just one more vote, which was all that was needed from Republicans to block DeVos. And DeVos’s history of opposing LGBT equality for kids is just the tip of this disastrous iceberg.

Donald Trump is now president — here are 8 guides to help you resist his agenda

Indivisible

Written by a group of progressive former congressional staffers, this guide takes the majority of its wisdom from an unlikely source: the Tea Party. “We saw these activists take on a popular president with a mandate for change and a supermajority in Congress,” the former staffers wrote about the Tea Party’s challenge to President Obama starting in 2009, shortly after he took office. “Their ideas were wrong, cruel and tinged with racism — and they won.”

So, taking a page from the Tea Party’s playbook, Indivisible offers practical dos and don'ts for people who want to challenge their elected officials. It urges activists to start and focus their efforts locally, because constituents are the people to whom every elected official is responsible.

Resistance Manual

This is a guide that was put together by Stay Woke — a branch of We, the Protesters, a group led by popular online activists DeRay McKesson and Netta Elzie. It’s a working document that lays out essential readings, issue areas and resources.

“The manual will grow over time as more and more people contribute updates, facts and resources to it,” McKesson wrote in an email announcing the manual’s release. “As such, we encourage you to contribute important information for others to read.”

Know Your Rights: Demonstrations and Protests

The right to peaceful assembly is a universal promise, but certainly not a guarantee. It’s a safe bet to expect civil disobedience to increase during Trump’s presidency. Big and small protests have already been happening in cities across the country, and those demonstrations are likely to get bigger and louder as Trump’s agenda unfolds in earnest. But the specifics of those protests are often hard to gauge. This guide, provided by the American Civil Liberties Union, helps with the nuts and bolts, such as how to secure permits, what restrictions need to be followed on private property and whether protesters have the right to take photos or videos during demonstrations.

Know Your Rights: What to Do if You’re Stopped by Police

Trump has promised to bring back law and order to America’s cities. But for many marginalized communities, that type of speech is just code for allowing law enforcement to wantonly stop, search and possibly arrest black and brown people — concerns for which there’s been plenty of precedent.

This is another guide from the ACLU. This one spells out what you have the right to ask and show police. Note that it’s never a certainty that those rights will be respected by a law enforcement officer during a confrontation, but this guide outlines your rights so you can at least know which of those rights are being violated and what violations to report later on.

Know Your Rights: Transgender People at Work

Trump has repeatedly vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which could have dire consequences for millions of Americans. But transgender communities already felt the brunt of those consequences in December, when a federal judge in Texas halted protections for transgender Americans in Obamacare shortly before they were set to go into effect.

While that’s one tangible effect of a Trump presidency fundamentally altering what’s possible for transgender communities, another will be limiting — or even drawing back — federal protections in housing and employment. Sen. Jeff Sessions, Trump’s pick for attorney general, has a history of anti-LGBTQ sentiment, including his refusal to sign a voluntary nondiscrimination pledge. He also voted against the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would offer federal protection against gender identity discrimination in the workplace. This guide, again from the ACLU, offers general overviews of what employers can and can’t do as it relates to employees’ gender identity.

Digital Security Tips for Protesters

Smartphones have become an indispensable tool for protesters, whether it’s used to document police violence or simply challenge the mainstream media’s narrative of what’s happening on the ground. But technology also leaves protesters vulnerable to government surveillance. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a nonprofit that focuses on civil liberties and technology, and its guide on digital security for protesters is a must-read. From how to send secure messages to friends to instructions for backing up your data and installing apps with strong encryption software, this guide has what protesters will need to make their voices heard.

How to apply for deferred action in the Trump era

It’s unclear what, exactly, will become of the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the immigration program he enacted by executive order that helped hundreds of thousands of immigrant young people gain temporary relief from deportation.

Neither Sessions nor Trump’s nominee for secretary of Homeland Security, Gen. John Kelly, would say one way or another in their confirmation hearings that participants in the program would not be targeted by immigration officials. And Trump himself vowed to end the program while he was running for office. But, as of now, the program still exists, and is one of the only forms of protection for immigrant youths. The National Immigration Law Center updated their tips on how to apply shortly after Trump was elected.

“Over 700,000 people so far have opted to apply for and received DACA, and many of them have found better paying jobs, gotten driver’s licenses, and enjoyed other positive benefits,” the group says on its website. “Again, whether to apply for DACA is a personal choice, but here are some of NILC’s post-election recommendations.”

Tips for reporting incidents of Islamophobia

It’s no surprise, given the “build-the-wall-ban-the-Muslims” rhetoric that permeated Trump’s campaign, that hate crimes ticked upward after his election. The Council on American-Islamic Relations has a bunch of resources for people who want to report bias incidents, and also makes it easy to report those incidents so that CAIR can keep count of them.

read more | follow @the-movemnt

8

Republicans feel wrath of angry constituents at fiery town hall meetings

  • Republican congressmen in traditionally red pockets of the country were greeted by angry constituents at town hall events Thursday night,
  •  They faced tough questions on holding Trump accountable, as well as the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. 
  • The most raucous event Thursday was held by Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican and chair of the House Oversight Committee, which is tasked with investigating ethical breaches in government.
  • More than 1,000 people attended the town hall, with hundreds more unable to get into the auditorium, according to NPR. Large chunks of the crowd booed and jeered Chaffetz throughout the evening.
  • In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Rep. Diane Black, chair of the powerful House Budget Committee that will have a major role in the possible repeal of the Affordable Care Act, per CNN, was also met by a packed crowd of angry constituents. Read more (2/10/17 8:53 AM)

I want Donald Trump to always be reminded that he didn’t win the popular vote. That he won the states of Michigan and Wisconsin with fewer votes than George W. Bush received in 2004 (Bush lost both states.) I want Trump to be reminded that he is the leader of the minority and not the majority, and the majority WILL NOT be conned. I want Trump to know that I will oppose Trump’s Presidency just as he opposed President Obama’s. AND FINALLY, I want Trump to know how much respect the majority had for a man whom he belittled and taunted. 

You own a sound prism. Unlike a light prism, which breaks up white light into its color constituents. A sound prism breaks sound into single streams. So in a crowded subway you can listen to each individual conversation. You are a detective.

2

Trump is threatening them if they vote against the bill, if you’re their constituent (or know someone who lives in their states), call them and make sure these reps know they answer to the American people and not to Trump.

Vote will take place on Thursday, March 23 - tell them to vote no on AHCA aka Trumpcare.

21 things you can do now to organize in your own community, brought to you by some of our generation’s leading activists and organizers.

1. Get familiar with your elected officials. Take a couple of minutes to double check your elected officials, their voting records and public stances. Whether you agree with them politically or not, learning a bit more about elected officials can be an effective way to understand and humanize them. Find your elected representatives here. — Mallika Madhusudan

2. Call and meet with your representatives. Politics is local, so contact your elected representatives on issues that matter to you. Whether it’s a member of your local school board or your senator, here’s how to do that effectively. Document your meetings on social media, on a podcast, in video or in writing. What did you discuss? What did you learn? How did it change your opinion or make you see things in a new way? Elected officials regularly review phone calls from constituents to get a sense of how they should vote. So this absolutely matters. Make your voice heard. Literally. — Mark Kogan

3. Lead a protest at your representative’s local office. Hashtag protests might get us likes, but they rarely change policy. Remember, most elected officials are not savvy on social media. So if you really want to make your voice heard, gather a group of friends and lead a protest outside your elected official’s local office. Call your local television station before you do so and make sure they bring their cameras. Alert reporters at local media companies and make sure they write about it. Even a group as small as 20 people can make a big difference if they are vocal and get attention. This kind of pressure becomes impossible for elected officials to ignore. — Mark Kogan

4. Run for office. There are over a half million elected officials in our country, and elections happen every year! Check out the new site RunforOffice.org or RunforAmerica.us to get started. Maybe it’s for your school board, town council, neighborhood commission or something else. Running for office is the highest expression of citizenship and one of the most important contributions to our system of self-government. — Nick Troiano

5. Take action every day. Sign up at www.FightTrump.co to receive a single action you can take every day. For example, this week you can call members of Congress and read them excerpts from Breitbart stories to protest Trump’s appointment of Steve Bannon to the White House. #FightTrump will send you actions you can do every week, every month and after Jan. 20, when Trump actually takes power. Get involved. Act. — Mark Kogan

6. Understand your local and state voting processes. Registering to vote is not as easy as it sounds — particularly for certain demographics, those without access to driver’s licenses or those without easy access to online or mobile registration. Investigate how people different from you experience voting. Learn about the challenges they face, such as voter suppression and disenfranchising regulations. — Shreya Ganeshan

7. Construct local monuments. When the Berlin Wall fell and so many countries were freed from Soviet-style communism, some of the first actions they took were to bury the dead, lay flowers at important public spaces and consecrate the public spaces that were now sacred sites for new democracies. Communities in profound political transition need to mourn. What are the sacred spaces in our communities right now — those that remind us what democracy means and why we will fight to keep it alive? How do we consecrate them and make them into places where we can all continue to meet and remember why we care about this country so much? — Szelena Gray

8. Fight to reform our political system. The operating system of our democracy needs an upgrade. Many of the structural incentives work to push us apart rather than bring us together. Support groups that are working to reform our political process. For example, FairVote is working on redistricting reform, Electoral College reform and voting reform. Some of these reforms can start at a local level. — Nick Troiano

9. Meet your fellow Americans. Try to meet and hold discussions with people unlike you. Get to know your fellow Americans. Strike up pen-pal connections or organize Skype and FaceTime chats with folks in different communities from your own. Focus on discussing tough issues and getting to know what is important to one another. — Mark Kogan

10. Move your money. Donating to worthy causes is an important way to make change. But if you don’t have a bunch of money to spare, commit to changing the way you spend the money you do have. Support black-owned businesses. Or consider moving your bank account from a large bank to a community bank or credit union. I recommend Amalgamated Bank. — Joelle Gamble

11. Commit to national service. Serve your community and the country by participating in public service. Participate in projects that emphasize community building and recovery. You don’t have to join the military or AmeriCorps: Find a local community project or state effort, meet people and help improve the lives of the people around you. — Mark Kogan

12. Make a plan for civic purpose. Check out Pathways, a nonpartisan civic leadership program. It’s a unique approach that provides a space where people can identify, plan and make moves toward their civic purpose. The idea is that people have to identify and own their decisions themselves, not be persuaded what to do. It’s intentionally nonpartisan and uses methodologies from several fields to design a program structure that is as empowering as possible. — Alex Torpey, Pathways program director

13. Disrupt the two-party duopoly. Both parties are over 150 years old! They no longer represent most Americans. We’re the generation that has revolutionized virtually every other industry, and it’s time we did the same for politics. A majority of millennials are political independents who consider themselves “fiscally conservative and socially liberal.” The Centrist Project is organizing this movement. Get involved and help shape it. — Nick Troiano, Centrist Project executive director

14. Exit your bubble. Diversify your news sources. Use an aggregator like RealClearPolitics for daily opinion pieces across the political spectrum. If you’re conservative-leaning, get a subscription to the New York Times. If you’re progressive-leaning, get a subscription to the Wall Street Journal. Recognize that your social media feed is likely an echo chamber and proactively work to challenge your thinking. — Nick Troiano

15. Learn from work being done globally. There is incredible work being done overseas, which provides valuable insights that can be applied to doing better community empowerment in the United States. So much “development” at home and abroad ignores the agency of a particular community. Organizations like Spark MicroGrants do really amazing jobs at being authentically community driven. — Alex Torpey

16. “Bring us together.” Richard Nixon adopted this slogan during his campaign after his aides saw a teenager carrying a sign with those words during a rally in Ohio. This should be the message we bring to every elected official after 2016. Bring us together, please. Make this the next political sign on your lawn, the next branded message on your social media profile — just make it the next thing you ask your elected official to do. Because it is the single most important thing for any of our leaders to do now. — Szelena Gray

17. Rebuild the Democratic Party. Go join that Democratic town committee you once joked about being a retirement home, and get your friends to come. Find your state offices and ask them for a calendar of events. Recruit the bravest, smartest people you know to run for local office. Or maybe you should run. Challenge elected officials in both parties to do better. Swamp their offices, jam their phone lines, list your demands. — Frank Chi

18. Go home more often. This Thanksgiving, remember that even one’s own family members and friends might be outside your political-thinking bubble. Acceptance and change can be hard without any exposure but might be easier coming from a loved one. Are you a transplant to a city from a small town or rural area? Do you work on this every day but your family in the suburbs doesn’t think about it much? Visit your family, visit other people’s families, share what’s important to you and organize within them. We need to show our representatives that we value compromise and coming together. —  Adrienne Scott and Brenna Conway

19. Stay woke. Rhetoric can persuade and mislead. As a new administration takes hold, there will be a flood of talk about what will and will not come out of Washington. Our job is to pay attention now, not a few weeks before the next election. Politicians can make promises and change stances. But actions speak louder than words. Learn who is being put in charge of government, research their background and see if what actions they talk about actually align with the change you hope to see. Sign up for listservs and updates from organizations who care about government accountability. Follow organizations who have a mission of fighting for the communities you care about. — Joelle Gamble

20. Challenge others to keep caring. A lot of people are really upset right now — far beyond individuals who are generally politically engaged and even beyond those who generally vote. Keep bugging your friends, family and neighbors to stay engaged. When you do something political or issue-driven, bring someone along. — Dominic Russel

21. Activate your skill set and leverage your expertise. Are you a creative in advertising? Design the resistance. Are you a developer in tech? Create technology for organizers. Are you in entertainment and work with celebrities who are outraged? Make sure they amplify the voices of those on the front lines. We shouldn’t all be doing just one thing. We should all be doing what we are best at. Moments like this require us to ask what we are experts on and how we can maximize our skill sets and our networks to make the most impact. — Frank Chi

(full article)

2

Calling your senators helps — but there’s an even better way to make your voice heard

  • A new study published Monday found that phone calls are not necessarily the best way to influence lawmakers when they have already taken a firm position on an issue.
  • The most effective way to influence a member of Congress’ vote is with “in-person issue visits from constituents,” according to a Congressional Management Foundation study that surveyed more than 1,200 congressional staffers and activists over a 12-year time period.
  • The study found in-person visits were tied with “contact from constituents reps” as the best way to influence a vote. Read more (2/14/17 8:34 AM)
urgent

The Affordable Care Act saves tens of thousands of lives per year and provides millions of people with healthcare. The senate is going to vote on a budget resolution that is supposed to lead to it being repealed very soon. Please call your senators and tell them to vote against the budget resolution.

Sample script: 

“Hi, I’m (your name), I’m a constituent and I’m calling to urge (your senator’s name) to vote against the budget resolution. The Affordable Care Act provides life-saving medical care for millions of Americans and we cannot afford to repeal it.”

8

#WeFightBack protesters are storming the halls of Congress to send a message to the GOP

  • With Republicans expected to vote on the American Health Care Act on Thursday, protestors fighting against the legislation gathered in Washington to make their opposition known.
  • Social media posts showed that groups of protesters assembled for a rally in Washington’s Freedom Square, while others marched through the halls of Congress to deliver a message straight to Paul Ryan and other lawmakers behind the proposed health care overhaul.
  • One video shared on Twitter featured demonstrators outside Ryan’s office as one of his constituents, a demonstrator named Maureen, led a crowd in repeating after her: “Paul Ryan, we’re in crisis. We need our health care. We rely on the Affordable Care Act to save our lives.” Read more (3/23/17 2:24 PM)

I just called my senators & congressman & asked them to make public statements that they oppose Trump’s appointment of Steve Bannon as his Chief of Staff.

Here’s what I said:
“Is Senator _________ aware of Bannon’s ant-semitic comments, and that he is supported by white supremacist groups like the KKK?”
“Well, I know that Senator ___________ is as appalled by ant-semitism & white nationalism as I am. I encourage him to publicly state his disapproval of Bannon, making it clear that extremists like him have no place in public office. I look forward to hearing his statement.”

Then I ask if they need my zip so they know I am a constituent.

WHAT GOOD WILL THIS DO:

Conventional wisdom is that 1 phone call to a congressperson represents 50 unheard voters. We need to let our politicians know we are mobilized.

We need to make it clear to conservatives that siding with Trump is going to be a political risk for them. Many Trump voters don’t actually love Trump, and republicans know that. They are on shakey ground. We need to drive a wedge within their party.

If by some miracle we stop Bannon’s appointment it will make for a saner 4 years. It will also be a symbol of Trumps weakness. Trump followers hate weakness. It will make him lose face.

If you have a progressive congressperson: Let them know they have your support in speaking out, or your gratitude if they’ve already done so. You can email them or write if you don’t want to overwhelm their phone lines.

Be nice to the person you’re talking to. They are aides.

SAVE YOUR CONGRESSPEOPLE’S NUMBERS IN YOUR PHONE. YOU WILL BE CALLING THEM A LOT IN THE NEXT FOUR YEARS.

GEORGIA PEOPLE: These are our senators, and the rep for GA district 10:

Senator Isakson
Local office: 770-661-0999
DC office: 202-224-3643

Senator Perdue
Local Office: 404-865-0087
DC Office: 202-224-3521


Congressman Hice (GA district 10)

Local Office: 770-207-1776

DC Office: 202-225-4101


bzfd.it
Betsy DeVos Is Confirmed As Education Secretary, Thanks To An Unprecedented Tie-Breaking Vote
The Senate voted 50-50 on Trump's controversial pick to head the Department of Education, forcing Vice President Mike Pence to cast a historic vote to break the tie.
By Molly Hensley-Clancy

WASHINGTON — The Senate confirmed Betsy DeVos as education secretary by a razor-thin margin Tuesday, with Vice President Mike Pence casting an unprecedented vote to break a 50-50 tie on a cabinet nomination. It is also the first time in history that an education secretary has ever been confirmed without bipartisan support.

No Democrats voted for DeVos’s nomination, and two Republicans crossed party lines to oppose her, saying they believed she was too inexperienced and narrowly focused on school choice issues like charter schools and vouchers to adequately support public schools.

But a frantic effort by Democrats — including a deluge of phone calls from constituents and 24 straight hours of anti-DeVos speeches on the Senate floor — failed to convince a third Republican to jump ship and kill the nomination. That left Pence with the deciding vote, the first time in Congressional history that a vice president has broken a tie on a cabinet nominee.