consecrators

🌱Snow Drop Protection Spell🌱

inspired by neil gaiman’s stardust, a floral charm to protect you from magic meant to cause you harm of grief

“The Snowdrop, in purest white arraie,
First rears her hedde on Candlemas Daie.“

 — An Early Calendar of English Flowers

🌱 the Snowdrop, or milkflower, is a harbinger of spring, signifying renewal and life at its most new and vibrant. From this, its use in magic the snowdrop is considered sacred and is a symbol of purity. It can be used to negate baneful magic and ill intents.  

🌱 gather: a snowdrop flower and clear quartz. 

🌱  if no snowdrops are available, make one from craft supplies and consecrate it with dew, or melted snow.

🌱 in the book, the charm is made of glass. charge the snowdrop over a piece of glass or clear quartz.

🌱 chant:

"It is a frozen charm […] A thing of power. Something like this can perform wonders and miracles in the right hands. Watch.” (Stardust - 8.164)

🌱 seal it with a kiss before using it, as in the book it was bought for a kiss. 

🌱 attach it to an article of clothing when you wish it to protect you.

“In a larger sense, we can not dedicate - we can not consecrate - we can not hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” - Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address

On this 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor & our entry into Workd War II, whisper a prayer for the souls of the departed & of gratitude for their last full measure of devotion.

#pearlharbor75 #gratitude

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NOVENA AND CONSECRATION TO THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION- 8 December

DAY NINE
O Mother of the King of the Universe,
most perfect member of the human race,
“our tainted nature’s solitary boast,”
we turn to you as mother,
advocate, and mediatrix. O Holy Mary,
assist us in our present necessity.
By your Immaculate Conception,
O Mary conceived without sin,
we humbly beseech you from the bottom of our heart
to intercede for us with your Divine Son
and ask that we be granted the favour for which we now plead…

(State your intention here…)

O Mary of the Immaculate Conception,
Mother of Christ,
you had influence with your Divine Son while upon this earth;
you have the same influence now in heaven.
Pray for us
and obtain for us from Him
the granting of my petition if it be the Divine Will.Amen

Consecration to the Immaculate Conception
On The feast of the Immaculate Conception

In the presence of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit and with heaven and earth as our witness, we prostrate ourselves at your feet, O Mary, Our Lady.

We acknowledge you as our Mother, as the Immaculate Conception, living tabernacle of the Divinity, as Queen of angels and of men, as Mother of the Church and of the Catholic priesthood and as refuge of the afflicted. That is why, small and weak as we are, we wish to consecrate to you our families, our persons, our works, our future, all that pertains to us and is in us and which God, in His immeasurable goodness, has entrusted to us for our good use.

We also consecrate to you the value of our good actions, past, present and future, leaving to you the entire and full right of disposing of us and all that belongs to us. Mary, be our Mother; sanctify us, purify us, correct us, guide us, pray for us and protect us.

Help us to perfectly fulfill the duties of our state of life.
Extinguish in us all self-love, which prevents your Divine Son, King and Sovereign Priest, from reigning in and around us.

Cover abundantly with thy maternal protection all the parishes, chapels, schools, works and missions and may you forever impede the devil from reigning, in any manner in the Church which desires to be entirely yours for the greater glory of God, the protection of our Holy Father and the exaltation of our Mother, the Holy Catholic Church and for the conversion of sinners. Amen.

Image – Anton Raphael Mengs


(via Anastpaul – Breathing Catholic)

Book of Shadows

The Book of Shadows (BOS) is used to store information you’ll need in your magical tradition, whatever it may be. 

Many Pagans and Wiccans feel a BOS should be handwritten -this will not only transfer energy to the writer, but it also helps you to memorize the contents. (Make sure you write legibly enough that you’ll be able to read your notes during a ritual!) - but some use a computer to store information as well. 

Bear in mind that a BOS is considered a sacred tool, which means it is an item of power that should be consecrated with all of your other magical tools. 

To make your Book of Shadows, begin with a blank notebook. A popular method is to use a three-ring binder so items can be added and rearranged as needed. If you use this style of BOS, you can use sheet protectors as well, which is great for preventing candle wax and other ritual drippings from getting on the pages! 

Whatever you select, your title page should include your name. Make it fancy or simple, depending on your preference, but remember that the BOS is a magical object and should be treated accordingly. Many witches simply write, “The Book of Shadows of [your name]” on the front page.

What format should you use? Some witches are known to create elaborate Books of Shadows in secret, magical alphabets. Unless you’re fluent enough in one of these systems that you can read it without having to check notes or a chart, stick with your native language. While a spell looks beautiful written out in flowing Elvish script or Klingon lettering, the fact is that it’s just hard to read unless you’re an Elf or a Klingon.

When it comes to the contents of your personal BOS, there are a few sections that are nearly universally included.

  • Laws of your coven or tradition: Believe it or not, magic has rules. While they may vary from group to group, it’s a really good idea to keep them at the front of your BOS as a reminder of what constitutes acceptable behavior and what doesn’t. If you’re part of an eclectic tradition that doesn’t have written rules, or if you’re a solitary witch, this is a good place to write down what YOU think are acceptable rules of magic;
  • A dedication: If you’ve been initiated into a coven, you may want to include a copy of your initiation ceremony here. However, many Wiccans dedicate themselves to a God or Goddess long before they become part of a coven. This is a good place to write out who you are dedicating yourself to, and why;
  • Gods and Goddesses: Depending on what pantheon or tradition you follow, you may have a single God and Goddess, or a number of them. Your BOS is a good place to keep legends and myths and even artwork concerning your Deity. If your practice is an eclectic blend of different spiritual paths, it’s a good idea to include that here;
  • Correspondence tables: When it comes to spellcasting, correspondence tables are some of your most important tools. Phases of the moon, herbs, stones and crystals, colors – all have different meanings and purposes. Keeping a chart of some sort in your BOS guarantees that this information will be at the ready when you really need it;
  • Sabbat rituals: The Wheel of the Year includes eight holidays for most Wiccans and Pagans, although some traditions do not celebrate all of them. Your BOS can include rituals for each of the Sabbats. Click here for more information.
  • Other rituals: If you’ll be celebrating each full moon, you’ll want to include an Esbat rite in your BOS. You can use the same one each month, or create several different ones tailored to the time of year. You may also wish to include sections on how to cast a circle and Drawing Down the Moon, a rite that celebrates the invoking of the Goddess at the time of the full moon. If you’ll be doing any rites for healing, prosperity, protection, or other purposes, be sure to include them here;
  • Herbs/Crystals: Ask any experienced Pagan or Wiccan about a specific herb or crystal, and chances are good that they’ll expound on not only the magical uses of them but also the healing properties and history of use. Herbalism and crystology are often considered the core of spellcasting, because plants and crystals are ingredients that people have used for literally thousands of years. Put together a section in your BOS for herbs, crystals and their uses. Click here and here for more information;
  • Divination: If you’re learning about Tarot, scrying, astrology, or any other form of divination, keep information in here. When you experiment with new methods of divination, keep a record of what you do and results you see in your Book of Shadows.
  • Sacred texts: While it’s fun to have a bunch of new shiny books on Wicca and Paganism to read, sometimes it’s just as nice to have information that’s a little more established. If there is a certain text that appeals to you, such as The Charge of the Goddess, an old prayer in an archaic language, or a particular chant that moves you, include it in your Book of Shadows;
  • Magical recipes: There’s a lot to be said for “kitchen witchery,” because for many people, the kitchen is the center of hearth and home. As you collect recipes for oils, incense, or herb blends, keep them in your BOS. You may even want to include a section of food recipes for Sabbat celebrations. Click here for more information;
  • Spell workings: Some people prefer to keep their spells in a separate book called a grimoire, but you can also keep them in your Book of Shadows. It’s easier to keep spells organized if you divide them up by purpose: prosperity, protection, healing, etc …

The biggest dilemma with any Book of Shadows is how to keep it organized. You can use tabbed dividers, create an index at the back, or if you’re really super-organized, a table of contents in the front. As you study and learn more, you’ll have more information to include (this is why the three-ring binder is such a practical idea).

Keep in mind that as our technology is constantly changing, the way we use it does too - there are people who keep their BOS completely digitally on a flash drive, their laptop, or even stored virtually to be accessed by their favorite mobile device. A BOS pulled up on a smart phone is no less valid than one copied by by hand in ink onto parchment.

You may want to use one notebook for information copied from books or downloaded off the Internet, and another for original creations. Regardless, find the method that works best for you, and take good care of your Book of Shadows. After all, it’s a sacred object and should be treated accordingly!

Book of Shadows consecrating ritual

You can consecrate your new Book of Shadows and Pen(s) of Art with a simple ritual:

On the night of a New Moon, cast a Circle as you feel comfortable doing, and gather together your book and pen(s), along with a blessed bowl of water, inside the circle. By candlelight, consecrate your writing equipment by holding your hands out, palms down, over the equipment and saying words like these:

Book of Shadows, leaves of white
Pen of Art with point so fine
Soon be filled with Sabbat rite
Magick charm and chanted spell.
Day by day and night by night,
White pages pen of art will fill.

Then anoint each pen, book, etc. with a symbol of your choosing (Pentagram, Crescent Moon, etc.) saying something like:

From this night of the moon,
I dedicate this book and this pen (etc.)
To the Mysteries of the Ancient Ways.
As I will, so mote it be!

Now inscribe the first page of the book with its title, whatever you choose to call it, using your Pen of Art. Below the title write the date in Pagan terms like “The third night of the Wolf Moon, 1999,” - whatever the date is, along with whatever you feel should be there along with the title.

Mechanics of a Spell

What makes a spell a spell? What are the moving pieces and the working parts? We get this question a lot, and though there isn’t a super easy answer, this is what we’ve gathered through our practice. 

Intent: 

This is your thought, you desire and your purpose. This is why you perform your spell, this is what gives it meaning.

Examples of Intent: To enhance love, to increase luck, to bring bad luck

Action: 

This is your moving piece. This is what transforms a mere thought into something that is acted upon. This is the glue between your intent and your energy.

Examples of action: Combining ingredients, writing or saying things aloud, burning objects, drawing sigils

Energy: 

This is the driving force of your spell. This is what your intent hinges on, and what will push your intent out into the universe.

Examples of Energy: Energy from an organic or important object, crystals, herbs, materials, consecration and charging 

Using this basic formula, you can create your own spells for any use with any materials on hand! 

The Green Witch’s Herbal Listing by Purpose
  • Balance- basil, chamomile, comfrey, mullein, nettle, woodruff.
  • Blessings- chamomile, dianthus, elder flowers, fennel, mint, oats, rosemary, rue, vervain.
  • Cleansing/Purification- avens, Betony, benzoin, burdock, clove, hyssop, lavender, mullein, parsley, pine, rosemary, thyme, vervain, wormwood, yarrow.
  • Consecration- acacia, anise, basil, clover, dragon’s blood, hyssop, lavender, mistletoe, mugwort, rosemary, rue, sunflower, vervain.
  • Countering Negative Energies- agrimony, avens, fennel, holly, hyssop, motherwort, rowan, rue, vervain.
  • Courage- basil, borage, mullein, rosemary, thyme.
  • Creativity- anise seed, basil, catnip, hawthorn, lavender, St. Johnswort, vervain.
  • Divination- anise seed, basil, bay, cinquefoil, clover, damiana, dittany of Crete, eyebright, honeysuckle, hops, lavender, marigold, moonwort, mugwort, mullein, orange peel, rowan, thyme, vervain, woodruff, wormwood, yarrow.
  • Encourage Changes- dragon’s blood, linden, purple heather, woodruff.
  • Energy/Power/Strength- cinquefoil, dragon’s blood, elder flower, fennel, St. Johnswort, vervain, woodruff.
  • Forture/Justice- bay, bergamot, cinquefoil, lemon balm, orange peel, star anise, vervain, woodruff.
  • Happiness/Peace- fennel, lavender, loosestrifle, rosemary, vervain, yarrow.
  • Healing- cinquefoil, comfrey, coriander, hops, lavender, lemon balm, mullein, rosemary, rue, sage, St. Johnswort, tansy, thyme.
  • Love- apple, avens, basil, cardamon, catnip, dill flowers, elm, ginger, lavender, lemon balm, linden leaves, marigold, marjoram, moonwort, mustard seed, orange peel, red heather, rosemary, vetivert, willow, yarrow.
  • Meditation- acacia, benzoin, chamomile, frankincense, woodruff.
  • Money- basil, bergamot, chamomile, clove, dill seeds, mint, moonwort, nutmeg, oats, vetivert.
  • Protection/Defense- betony, burth, burdock, cumin, dianthus, dill leaves, fennel, fern, marjoram, mint, mugwort, mullein, mustard, parsley, rosemary, rue, sage, vervain, white heather, woodruff, wormwood, yarrow.
  • Psychic Awareness- bay, betony, burdock, cinnamon, elderflower, lavender, mace, marigold, star anise, woodruff.
  • Releasing Negativity- betony, clove, hyssop, mugwort, rosemary, St. Johnswort, thyme, vervain, vetivert, yarrow.
  • Sealing/Sending Positive Energy- angelica, wormwood.
  • Spirit Contact/Blessings- lilac, purple heather, mint, Solomon’s Seal.
  • Strength/Willpower- rosemary, St. Jpohnswort.
  • Wisdom- elder, sage, willow.

Source:
Grimoire for the Green Witch- A Complete Book of Shadows by Ann Moura

Wand

Clichéd as it may sound, the wand is one of the most popular magical tools in Wicca, as well as in some ceremonial magic traditions. 

It has a number of magical purposes:

  • A wand is used for the directing of energy during a ritual;
  • Because it’s a phallic symbol it is used to represent male energy, power, and virility;
  • Representative of the element of Air (although in a few traditions it symbolizes Fire), the wand can be used to consecrate a sacred space, or invoke deity.

Wands are traditionally made from willow, elder or oak, though almost any material can be used to create a wand. Sometimes crystals are added to the tips of wands, since crystals amplify the energy sent through the wand.

How to make your own wand

You’ll need:

  • Stick from a tree: this should be approx. 8"-12" long, or whatever feels most comfortable to you. (I get mine off of the ground, there isn’t any need to harm the tree);
  • Glue: Tacky, Super, or Epoxy (read bottle for best application);
  • Decorations: such as crystal points, stones, feathers, ribbon, paint to draw runes or symbols.

Wood you can choose from for your wand:

  • Balsa: Psychic awareness
  • Cedar: Healing, purification, protection
  • Cherry: Love
  • Ebony: Protection, magickal energy
  • Elder: Spirituality, protection
  • Eucalyptus: Healing
  • Maple: Love, money
  • Oak: Strength, health
  • Pine: Money, healing, exorcism
  • Walnut: Health
  • Willow: Psychic awareness, blessings of the Moon

Take a branch from a tree that is fairly straight and the right length for a wand. Preferably this should be one you find, but it can also be taken from a living tree if you psychically “ask the tree’s permission”. But if you get a strong feeling this is wrong and that you shouldn’t cut that tree, don’t do it.                                     Either way, leave an offering of thanks: if you are in Wicca/NeoPaganism traditions, a libation of apple juice is appropriate or some home-baked cakes (unfrosted plain cupcakes, corn muffins, oatmeals or cornmeal, cookies or cornbread, a loaf of all-natural whole where bread) but please no twinkles and junkfood.

Remember: this should be done on the Waxing Moon.

Now that you have cut the branch, you’ll need to smooth down the wand: make sure all the splintered areas are smoothed out nicely, even on each end, so not to poke you while you work with it or use it afterwards.

After that, you can begin decorating it if you wish. I like to use a woodburner and burn my magickal name into it, along with a pentagram, or pentacle, celtic cross, triquetra, whatever your heart desires. I’ve seen some that actually had some beautiful pictures on them.                                                                 Whatever you decide to do to it, just remember that you are putting your energy into it. Use your imagination, paint something onto it, or carve something into it, or add crystals or gemstones to it in some decorative way. And don’t say “I have no imagination,” because we all have an imagination

Now that you have it decorated to your liking, the next and final step is to seal it and make it weather resistant you might say. I prefer to use a polyurethane stain on mine, especially the lighter woods. I usually don’t use anything any darker than a pecan colored stain, but I have been known to use a cherry stain, which turned out real pretty. Of course you can also use a clear stain as well. But the whole point to this step is to seal the wood so that it will last longer. I usually put at least two coats of the polyurethane stain on mine. I will put more depending on how dry the wood is.

Now this is just one way of making the wand and staff. I know there are many other ways and methods of doing this out there, I just know that this is how I do it. It is not a difficult method to use and your wand and staff still serve for the same purpose. They are merely an extension of yourself, but when properly made and designed, they can not only be your extension but an amplification as well.

How to consecrate:

You’ll need:

  • a small bowl of salt —> north/earth;
  • incense —> east/air;
  • a white candle —> south/fire;
  • a cup of water —> west/water.

If your tradition requires you to cast a circle, do so now.

Light the candle and the incense. Take the wand in your hands, and face north. Pass it over the salt and say:

Powers of the North,
Guardians of the Earth,
I consecrate this wand of (name of the wood),
and charge it with your energies.
I purify it this night, and make this tool sacred.

Now, turn to the east and, holding the tool in the smoke of the incense, say:

Powers of the East,
Guardians of the Air,
I consecrate this wand of (name of the wood),
and charge it with your energies.
I purify it this night, and make this tool sacred.

Next, face the south and pass the tool over the flame of the candle and repeat the process, saying:

Powers of the South,
Guardians of Fire,
I consecrate this wand of (name of the wood),
and charge it with your energies.
I purify it this night, and make this tool sacred.

Finally, turn to the west, and pass your ritual tool over the cup of water. Say:

Powers of the West,
Guardians of Water,
I consecrate this wand of (name of the wood),
and charge it with your energies.
I purify it this night, and make this tool sacred.

Face your altar, hold the wand to the sky, and say:

I charge this wand in the name of Old Ones,
the Ancients, the Sun and the Moon and the Stars.
By the powers of the Earth, of Air, of Fire and of Water
I banish the energies of any previous owners,
and make it new and fresh.
I consecrate this wand,
and it is mine.

Now you’ve not only consecrated the tool, you’ve claimed ownership. In many Pagan traditions, including some forms of Wicca, it’s considered a good idea to put the item to use immediately to bind the consecration and strengthen the energy of the tool. If you’ve consecrated a wand you can use it in a ceremony to consecrate another tool.

Moon Spells

Each phase of the moon influences with a different type of energy. You can follow the phases of the moon, to converge the energy in favor of the things you wish to accoplish. 


WAXING MOON

To bless something you wanna start, to increase health, to increase success, to increase wealth


FULL MOON:

Related to health, success, charging/consecrating objects, rituals in general, wealth


WANING MOON: 

To get rid of a bad habit, diseases, obstacles, finish something, banish


NEW MOON

To reflect, to expand your consciousness, to learn about your shadow self, work with your subconscious, dream work, let go of fears, change something radically, renew

Book of Shadows

The Book of Shadows (BOS) is used to store information you’ll need in your magical tradition, whatever it may be. Many Pagans and Wiccans feel a BOS should be handwritten, but some use a computer to store information as well. Bear in mind that a BOS is considered a sacred tool, which means it is an item of power that should be consecrated with all of your other magical tools. In many traditions, it is believed you should copy spells and rituals into your BOS by hand – this will not only transfer energy to the writer, but it also helps you to memorize the contents.

Make sure you write legibly enough that you’ll be able to read your notes during a ritual!

To make your Book of Shadows, begin with a blank notebook. A popular method is to use a three-ring binder so items can be added and rearranged as needed. If you use this style of BOS, you can use sheet protectors as well, which is great for preventing candle wax and other ritual drippings from getting on the pages!

Whatever you select, your title page should include your name. Make it fancy or simple, depending on your preference, but remember that the BOS is a magical object and should be treated accordingly. Many witches simply write, “The Book of Shadows of [your name]” on the front page.

When it comes to the contents of your personal BOS, there are a few sections that are nearly universally included.

  • Laws of your coven or tradition: Believe it or not, magic has rules. While they may vary from group to group, it’s a really good idea to keep them at the front of your BOS as a reminder of what constitutes acceptable behavior and what doesn’t. If you’re part of an eclectic tradition that doesn’t have written rules, or if you’re a solitary witch, this is a good place to write down what YOU think are acceptable rules of magic. After all, if you don’t set yourself some guidelines, how will you know when you’ve crossed over them? This may include a variation on the Wiccan Rede, or some similar concept.
  • A dedication: If you’ve been initiated into a coven, you may want to include a copy of your initiation ceremony here. However, many Wiccans dedicate themselves to a God or Goddess long before they become part of a coven. This is a good place to write out who you are dedicating yourself to, and why. This can be a lengthy essay, or it can be as simple as saying, “I, Willow, dedicate myself to the Goddess today, June 21, 2007.”
  • Gods and Goddesses: Depending on what pantheon or tradition you follow, you may have a single God and Goddess, or a number of them. Your BOS is a good place to keep legends and myths and even artwork concerning your Deity. If your practice is an eclectic blend of different spiritual paths, it’s a good idea to include that here.
  • Correspondence tables: When it comes to spellcasting, correspondence tables are some of your most important tools. Phases of the moon, herbs, stones and crystals, colors – all have different meanings and purposes. Keeping a chart of some sort in your BOS guarantees that this information will be at the ready when you really need it. If you have access to a good almanac, it’s not a bad idea to record a years’ worth of moon phases by date in your BOS.
  • Sabbat rituals: The Wheel of the Year includes eight holidays for most Wiccans and Pagans, although some traditions do not celebrate all of them. Your BOS can include rituals for each of the Sabbats. For example, for Samhain you may wish to create a rite that honors your ancestors and celebrates the end of the harvest, while for Yule you may want to write down a celebration of the winter Solstice. A Sabbat celebration can be as simple or complex as you wish.
  • Other rituals: If you’ll be celebrating each full moon, you’ll want to include an Esbat ritein your BOS. You can use the same one each month, or create several different ones tailored to the time of year. You may also wish to include sections on how to cast a circle and Drawing Down the Moon, a rite that celebrates the invoking of the Goddess at the time of the full moon. If you’ll be doing any rites for healing, prosperity, protection, or other purposes, be sure to include them here.
  • Herbs: Ask any experienced Pagan or Wiccan about a specific herb, and chances are good that they’ll expound on not only the magical uses of the plant but also the healing properties and history of use. Herbalism is often considered the core of spell casting, because plants are an ingredient that people have used for literally thousands of years. Put together a section in your BOS for herbs and their uses. Remember, many herbs should not be ingested, so it’s important to research thoroughly before you take anything internally.
  • Divination: If you’re learning about Tarot, scrying, astrology, or any other form of divination, keep information in here. When you experiment with new methods of divination, keep a record of what you do and results you see in your Book of Shadows.
  • Sacred texts: While it’s fun to have a bunch of new shiny books on Wicca and Paganism read, sometimes it’s just as nice to have information that’s a little more established. If there is a certain text that appeals to you, such as The Charge of the Goddess, an old prayer in an archaic language, or a particular chant that moves you, include it in your Book of Shadows.
  • Magical recipes: There’s a lot to be said for “kitchen witchery,” because for many people, the kitchen is the center of hearth and home. As you collect recipes for oils,incense, or herb blends, keep them in your BOS. You may even want to include a section of food recipes for Sabbat celebrations.
  • Spell workings: Some people prefer to keep their spells in a separate book called a grimoire, but you can also keep them in your Book of Shadows. It’s easier to keep spells organized if you divide them up by purpose: prosperity, protection, healing, etc. With each spell you include make sure you also leave room to include information on when the working was performed and what the outcome was.
3

Protection Bottle Spell

Cast a circle. Burn some protection or sun incense, or a smudge stick. Take each ingredient and place it in the bottle, while verbalizing what each ingredient is meant to represent. (You could also replace any of these items with an ingredient that empowers your intent.) I’m not going to post the spell I wrote for myself because it is personal, but here is what each item generally means:

  • Moss slowly devours evergreens, taking out even the most resilient opponents. It represents the gradual, creeping karmic revenge and retribution that will consume anyone who wishes you harm.
  • Tar water is a powerful protection elixir that keeps every entity out of your home. You can make this with any pine sap. I used Pinyon sap because it’s my favorite evergreen here in California. 
  • The incense is sun incense I consecrated at high noon on Litha. It represents bright light and cleansing, as sunlight is the best disinfectant. 
  • Sage is a traditional herb used for smudging and cleansing an area.
  • Citrine replaces all ill intent with luck.
  • Thistle spines are meant to impale all negative energy/entities, or anything else you’d like to banish from your home.

Add a piece of your hair to mark the bottle as yours. Seal it with wax or glue. Place it near your front door where it won’t be disturbed, or bury it in a potted plant nearby. Smudge your house with the windows open afterwards to allow anything residual to escape.

requested by jayandkayy.